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Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator

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Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator. / Schick, Robert Schilling; New, Leslie; Thomas, Len; Costa, Daniel; Hindell, Mark; McMahon, Clive; Robinson, Patrick; Simmons, Samantha; Thums, Michele; Harwood, John; Clark, James.

In: Journal of Animal Ecology, Vol. 82, No. 6, 2013, p. 1300-1315.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Schick, RS, New, L, Thomas, L, Costa, D, Hindell, M, McMahon, C, Robinson, P, Simmons, S, Thums, M, Harwood, J & Clark, J 2013, 'Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator' Journal of Animal Ecology, vol. 82, no. 6, pp. 1300-1315. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.12102

APA

Schick, R. S., New, L., Thomas, L., Costa, D., Hindell, M., McMahon, C., ... Clark, J. (2013). Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator. Journal of Animal Ecology, 82(6), 1300-1315. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.12102

Vancouver

Schick RS, New L, Thomas L, Costa D, Hindell M, McMahon C et al. Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator. Journal of Animal Ecology. 2013;82(6):1300-1315. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2656.12102

Author

Schick, Robert Schilling ; New, Leslie ; Thomas, Len ; Costa, Daniel ; Hindell, Mark ; McMahon, Clive ; Robinson, Patrick ; Simmons, Samantha ; Thums, Michele ; Harwood, John ; Clark, James. / Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator. In: Journal of Animal Ecology. 2013 ; Vol. 82, No. 6. pp. 1300-1315.

Bibtex - Download

@article{0679ef69a6824f2189d831faeb2df5f4,
title = "Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator",
abstract = "(1) Body condition plays a fundamental role in many ecological and evolutionary processes at a variety of scales and across a broad range of animal taxa. An understanding of how body condition changes at fine spatial and temporal scales as a result of interaction with the environment provides necessary information about how animals acquire resources. (2) However, comparatively little is known about intra- and interindividual variation of condition in marine systems. Where condition has been studied, changes typically are recorded at relatively coarse time-scales. By quantifying how fine-scale interaction with the environment influences condition, we can broaden our understanding of how animals acquire resources and allocate them to body stores. (3) Here we used a hierarchical Bayesian state-space model to estimate the body condition as measured by the size of an animal's lipid store in two closely related species of marine predator that occupy different hemispheres: northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) and southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina). The observation model linked drift dives to lipid stores. The process model quantified daily changes in lipid stores as a function of the physiological condition of the seal (lipid:lean tissue ratio, departure lipid and departure mass), its foraging location, two measures of behaviour and environmental covariates. (4) We found that physiological condition significantly impacted lipid gain at two time-scales – daily and at departure from the colony – that foraging location was significantly associated with lipid gain in both species of elephant seals and that long-term behavioural phase was associated with positive lipid gain in northern and southern elephant seals. In northern elephant seals, the occurrence of short-term behavioural states assumed to represent foraging were correlated with lipid gain. Lipid gain was a function of covariates in both species. Southern elephant seals performed fewer drift dives than northern elephant seals and gained lipids at a lower rate. (5) We have demonstrated a new way to obtain time series of body condition estimates for a marine predator at fine spatial and temporal scales. This modelling approach accounts for uncertainty at many levels and has the potential to integrate physiological and movement ecology of top predators. The observation model we used was specific to elephant seals, but the process model can readily be applied to other species, providing an opportunity to understand how animals respond to their environment at a fine spatial scale.",
keywords = "Resource acquisition, Bayesian, Elephant seals, Markov chain Monte Carlo, Satellite telemetry, State-space model, Body condition, A{\~n}o Nuevo, Macquarie Island",
author = "Schick, {Robert Schilling} and Leslie New and Len Thomas and Daniel Costa and Mark Hindell and Clive McMahon and Patrick Robinson and Samantha Simmons and Michele Thums and John Harwood and James Clark",
note = "This article was made open access through BIS OA funding.",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1111/1365-2656.12102",
language = "English",
volume = "82",
pages = "1300--1315",
journal = "Journal of Animal Ecology",
issn = "0021-8790",
publisher = "Blackwell Science Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Estimating resource acquisition and at-sea body condition of a marine predator

AU - Schick, Robert Schilling

AU - New, Leslie

AU - Thomas, Len

AU - Costa, Daniel

AU - Hindell, Mark

AU - McMahon, Clive

AU - Robinson, Patrick

AU - Simmons, Samantha

AU - Thums, Michele

AU - Harwood, John

AU - Clark, James

N1 - This article was made open access through BIS OA funding.

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - (1) Body condition plays a fundamental role in many ecological and evolutionary processes at a variety of scales and across a broad range of animal taxa. An understanding of how body condition changes at fine spatial and temporal scales as a result of interaction with the environment provides necessary information about how animals acquire resources. (2) However, comparatively little is known about intra- and interindividual variation of condition in marine systems. Where condition has been studied, changes typically are recorded at relatively coarse time-scales. By quantifying how fine-scale interaction with the environment influences condition, we can broaden our understanding of how animals acquire resources and allocate them to body stores. (3) Here we used a hierarchical Bayesian state-space model to estimate the body condition as measured by the size of an animal's lipid store in two closely related species of marine predator that occupy different hemispheres: northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) and southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina). The observation model linked drift dives to lipid stores. The process model quantified daily changes in lipid stores as a function of the physiological condition of the seal (lipid:lean tissue ratio, departure lipid and departure mass), its foraging location, two measures of behaviour and environmental covariates. (4) We found that physiological condition significantly impacted lipid gain at two time-scales – daily and at departure from the colony – that foraging location was significantly associated with lipid gain in both species of elephant seals and that long-term behavioural phase was associated with positive lipid gain in northern and southern elephant seals. In northern elephant seals, the occurrence of short-term behavioural states assumed to represent foraging were correlated with lipid gain. Lipid gain was a function of covariates in both species. Southern elephant seals performed fewer drift dives than northern elephant seals and gained lipids at a lower rate. (5) We have demonstrated a new way to obtain time series of body condition estimates for a marine predator at fine spatial and temporal scales. This modelling approach accounts for uncertainty at many levels and has the potential to integrate physiological and movement ecology of top predators. The observation model we used was specific to elephant seals, but the process model can readily be applied to other species, providing an opportunity to understand how animals respond to their environment at a fine spatial scale.

AB - (1) Body condition plays a fundamental role in many ecological and evolutionary processes at a variety of scales and across a broad range of animal taxa. An understanding of how body condition changes at fine spatial and temporal scales as a result of interaction with the environment provides necessary information about how animals acquire resources. (2) However, comparatively little is known about intra- and interindividual variation of condition in marine systems. Where condition has been studied, changes typically are recorded at relatively coarse time-scales. By quantifying how fine-scale interaction with the environment influences condition, we can broaden our understanding of how animals acquire resources and allocate them to body stores. (3) Here we used a hierarchical Bayesian state-space model to estimate the body condition as measured by the size of an animal's lipid store in two closely related species of marine predator that occupy different hemispheres: northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) and southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina). The observation model linked drift dives to lipid stores. The process model quantified daily changes in lipid stores as a function of the physiological condition of the seal (lipid:lean tissue ratio, departure lipid and departure mass), its foraging location, two measures of behaviour and environmental covariates. (4) We found that physiological condition significantly impacted lipid gain at two time-scales – daily and at departure from the colony – that foraging location was significantly associated with lipid gain in both species of elephant seals and that long-term behavioural phase was associated with positive lipid gain in northern and southern elephant seals. In northern elephant seals, the occurrence of short-term behavioural states assumed to represent foraging were correlated with lipid gain. Lipid gain was a function of covariates in both species. Southern elephant seals performed fewer drift dives than northern elephant seals and gained lipids at a lower rate. (5) We have demonstrated a new way to obtain time series of body condition estimates for a marine predator at fine spatial and temporal scales. This modelling approach accounts for uncertainty at many levels and has the potential to integrate physiological and movement ecology of top predators. The observation model we used was specific to elephant seals, but the process model can readily be applied to other species, providing an opportunity to understand how animals respond to their environment at a fine spatial scale.

KW - Resource acquisition

KW - Bayesian

KW - Elephant seals

KW - Markov chain Monte Carlo

KW - Satellite telemetry

KW - State-space model

KW - Body condition

KW - Año Nuevo

KW - Macquarie Island

U2 - 10.1111/1365-2656.12102

DO - 10.1111/1365-2656.12102

M3 - Article

VL - 82

SP - 1300

EP - 1315

JO - Journal of Animal Ecology

T2 - Journal of Animal Ecology

JF - Journal of Animal Ecology

SN - 0021-8790

IS - 6

ER -

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ID: 50927985