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Ethnographic plague: configuring disease on the Chinese-Russian frontier

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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Ethnographic plague : configuring disease on the Chinese-Russian frontier. / Lynteris, Christos.

London : Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 218 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Harvard

Lynteris, C 2016, Ethnographic plague: configuring disease on the Chinese-Russian frontier. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-59685-7

APA

Lynteris, C. (2016). Ethnographic plague: configuring disease on the Chinese-Russian frontier. Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-59685-7

Vancouver

Lynteris C. Ethnographic plague: configuring disease on the Chinese-Russian frontier. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 218 p. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-59685-7

Author

Lynteris, Christos. / Ethnographic plague : configuring disease on the Chinese-Russian frontier. London : Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 218 p.

Bibtex - Download

@book{3ba710a61eec4761ac7f29d681b6c047,
title = "Ethnographic plague: configuring disease on the Chinese-Russian frontier",
abstract = "Challenging the concept that since the discovery of the plague bacillus in 1894 the study of the disease was dominated by bacteriology, Ethnographic Plague argues for the role of ethnography as a vital contributor to the configuration of plague at the turn of the nineteenth century. With a focus on research on the Chinese-Russian frontier, where a series of pneumonic plague epidemics shook the Chinese, Russian and Japanese Empires, this book examines how native Mongols and Buryats came to be understood as holding a traditional knowledge of the disease. Exploring the forging and consequences of this alluring theory, this book seeks to understand medical fascination with culture, so as to underline the limitations of the employment of the latter as an explanatory category in the context of infectious disease epidemics, such as the recent SARS and Ebola outbreaks.",
keywords = "Russia, China, Ethnography, Plague, Epidemic",
author = "Christos Lynteris",
note = "Research leading to this book was funded by a European Research Council Starting Grant (under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme/ERC grant agreement no 336564)",
year = "2016",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1057/978-1-137-59685-7",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781137596840",
publisher = "Palgrave Macmillan",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - BOOK

T1 - Ethnographic plague

T2 - configuring disease on the Chinese-Russian frontier

AU - Lynteris, Christos

N1 - Research leading to this book was funded by a European Research Council Starting Grant (under the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme/ERC grant agreement no 336564)

PY - 2016/7

Y1 - 2016/7

N2 - Challenging the concept that since the discovery of the plague bacillus in 1894 the study of the disease was dominated by bacteriology, Ethnographic Plague argues for the role of ethnography as a vital contributor to the configuration of plague at the turn of the nineteenth century. With a focus on research on the Chinese-Russian frontier, where a series of pneumonic plague epidemics shook the Chinese, Russian and Japanese Empires, this book examines how native Mongols and Buryats came to be understood as holding a traditional knowledge of the disease. Exploring the forging and consequences of this alluring theory, this book seeks to understand medical fascination with culture, so as to underline the limitations of the employment of the latter as an explanatory category in the context of infectious disease epidemics, such as the recent SARS and Ebola outbreaks.

AB - Challenging the concept that since the discovery of the plague bacillus in 1894 the study of the disease was dominated by bacteriology, Ethnographic Plague argues for the role of ethnography as a vital contributor to the configuration of plague at the turn of the nineteenth century. With a focus on research on the Chinese-Russian frontier, where a series of pneumonic plague epidemics shook the Chinese, Russian and Japanese Empires, this book examines how native Mongols and Buryats came to be understood as holding a traditional knowledge of the disease. Exploring the forging and consequences of this alluring theory, this book seeks to understand medical fascination with culture, so as to underline the limitations of the employment of the latter as an explanatory category in the context of infectious disease epidemics, such as the recent SARS and Ebola outbreaks.

KW - Russia

KW - China

KW - Ethnography

KW - Plague

KW - Epidemic

UR - https://www.palgrave.com/gb/book/9781137596840

UR - https://discover.libraryhub.jisc.ac.uk/search?q=title:Ethnographic+plague+configuring+disease+on+the+Chinese-Russian

U2 - 10.1057/978-1-137-59685-7

DO - 10.1057/978-1-137-59685-7

M3 - Book

SN - 9781137596840

BT - Ethnographic plague

PB - Palgrave Macmillan

CY - London

ER -

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