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Examining the role of individual movement in promoting coexistence in a spatially explicit prisoner's dilemma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Examining the role of individual movement in promoting coexistence in a spatially explicit prisoner's dilemma. / Burgess, Andrew E. F.; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Schofield, Pietà G.; Hubbard, Stephen F.; Chaplain, Mark A. J.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 419, 21.04.2017, p. 323-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Burgess, AEF, Lorenzi, T, Schofield, PG, Hubbard, SF & Chaplain, MAJ 2017, 'Examining the role of individual movement in promoting coexistence in a spatially explicit prisoner's dilemma', Journal of Theoretical Biology, vol. 419, pp. 323-332. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2017.02.028

APA

Burgess, A. E. F., Lorenzi, T., Schofield, P. G., Hubbard, S. F., & Chaplain, M. A. J. (2017). Examining the role of individual movement in promoting coexistence in a spatially explicit prisoner's dilemma. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 419, 323-332. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2017.02.028

Vancouver

Burgess AEF, Lorenzi T, Schofield PG, Hubbard SF, Chaplain MAJ. Examining the role of individual movement in promoting coexistence in a spatially explicit prisoner's dilemma. Journal of Theoretical Biology. 2017 Apr 21;419:323-332. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2017.02.028

Author

Burgess, Andrew E. F. ; Lorenzi, Tommaso ; Schofield, Pietà G. ; Hubbard, Stephen F. ; Chaplain, Mark A. J. / Examining the role of individual movement in promoting coexistence in a spatially explicit prisoner's dilemma. In: Journal of Theoretical Biology. 2017 ; Vol. 419. pp. 323-332.

Bibtex - Download

@article{cd280183308d42aeb1d92dcceec41c65,
title = "Examining the role of individual movement in promoting coexistence in a spatially explicit prisoner's dilemma",
abstract = "The emergence of cooperation is a major conundrum of evolutionary biology. To unravel this evolutionary riddle, several models have been developed within the theoretical framework of spatial game theory, focussing on the interactions between two general classes of player, {"}cooperators{"} and {"}defectors{"}. Generally, explicit movement in the spatial domain is not considered in these models, with strategies moving via imitation or through colonisation of neighbouring sites. We present here a spatially explicit stochastic individual-based model in which pure cooperators and defectors undergo random motion via diffusion and also chemotaxis guided by the gradient of a semiochemical. Individual movement rules are derived from an underlying system of reaction-diffusion-taxis partial differential equations which describes the dynamics of the local number of individuals and the concentration of the semiochemical. Local interactions are governed by the payoff matrix of the classical prisoner's dilemma, and accumulated payoffs are translated into offspring. We investigate the cases of both synchronous and non-synchronous generations. Focussing on an ecological scenario where defectors are parasitic on cooperators, we find that random motion and semiochemical sensing bring about self-generated patterns in which resident cooperators and parasitic defectors can coexist in proportions that fluctuate about non-zero values. Remarkably, coexistence emerges as a genuine consequence of the natural tendency of cooperators to aggregate into clusters, without the need for them to find physical shelter or outrun the parasitic defectors. This provides further evidence that spatial clustering enhances the benefits of mutual cooperation and plays a crucial role in preserving cooperative behaviours. ",
keywords = "Spatial games, Random motion, Chemotaxis, Prisoner's dilemma, Spatial patterning",
author = "Burgess, {Andrew E. F.} and Tommaso Lorenzi and Schofield, {Piet{\`a} G.} and Hubbard, {Stephen F.} and Chaplain, {Mark A. J.}",
note = "AEFB gratefully acknowledges the support of an EPSRC CASE PhD studentship. ",
year = "2017",
month = apr,
day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/j.jtbi.2017.02.028",
language = "English",
volume = "419",
pages = "323--332",
journal = "Journal of Theoretical Biology",
issn = "0022-5193",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Examining the role of individual movement in promoting coexistence in a spatially explicit prisoner's dilemma

AU - Burgess, Andrew E. F.

AU - Lorenzi, Tommaso

AU - Schofield, Pietà G.

AU - Hubbard, Stephen F.

AU - Chaplain, Mark A. J.

N1 - AEFB gratefully acknowledges the support of an EPSRC CASE PhD studentship.

PY - 2017/4/21

Y1 - 2017/4/21

N2 - The emergence of cooperation is a major conundrum of evolutionary biology. To unravel this evolutionary riddle, several models have been developed within the theoretical framework of spatial game theory, focussing on the interactions between two general classes of player, "cooperators" and "defectors". Generally, explicit movement in the spatial domain is not considered in these models, with strategies moving via imitation or through colonisation of neighbouring sites. We present here a spatially explicit stochastic individual-based model in which pure cooperators and defectors undergo random motion via diffusion and also chemotaxis guided by the gradient of a semiochemical. Individual movement rules are derived from an underlying system of reaction-diffusion-taxis partial differential equations which describes the dynamics of the local number of individuals and the concentration of the semiochemical. Local interactions are governed by the payoff matrix of the classical prisoner's dilemma, and accumulated payoffs are translated into offspring. We investigate the cases of both synchronous and non-synchronous generations. Focussing on an ecological scenario where defectors are parasitic on cooperators, we find that random motion and semiochemical sensing bring about self-generated patterns in which resident cooperators and parasitic defectors can coexist in proportions that fluctuate about non-zero values. Remarkably, coexistence emerges as a genuine consequence of the natural tendency of cooperators to aggregate into clusters, without the need for them to find physical shelter or outrun the parasitic defectors. This provides further evidence that spatial clustering enhances the benefits of mutual cooperation and plays a crucial role in preserving cooperative behaviours.

AB - The emergence of cooperation is a major conundrum of evolutionary biology. To unravel this evolutionary riddle, several models have been developed within the theoretical framework of spatial game theory, focussing on the interactions between two general classes of player, "cooperators" and "defectors". Generally, explicit movement in the spatial domain is not considered in these models, with strategies moving via imitation or through colonisation of neighbouring sites. We present here a spatially explicit stochastic individual-based model in which pure cooperators and defectors undergo random motion via diffusion and also chemotaxis guided by the gradient of a semiochemical. Individual movement rules are derived from an underlying system of reaction-diffusion-taxis partial differential equations which describes the dynamics of the local number of individuals and the concentration of the semiochemical. Local interactions are governed by the payoff matrix of the classical prisoner's dilemma, and accumulated payoffs are translated into offspring. We investigate the cases of both synchronous and non-synchronous generations. Focussing on an ecological scenario where defectors are parasitic on cooperators, we find that random motion and semiochemical sensing bring about self-generated patterns in which resident cooperators and parasitic defectors can coexist in proportions that fluctuate about non-zero values. Remarkably, coexistence emerges as a genuine consequence of the natural tendency of cooperators to aggregate into clusters, without the need for them to find physical shelter or outrun the parasitic defectors. This provides further evidence that spatial clustering enhances the benefits of mutual cooperation and plays a crucial role in preserving cooperative behaviours.

KW - Spatial games

KW - Random motion

KW - Chemotaxis

KW - Prisoner's dilemma

KW - Spatial patterning

U2 - 10.1016/j.jtbi.2017.02.028

DO - 10.1016/j.jtbi.2017.02.028

M3 - Article

VL - 419

SP - 323

EP - 332

JO - Journal of Theoretical Biology

JF - Journal of Theoretical Biology

SN - 0022-5193

ER -

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