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Exposure to high solar radiation reduces self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors

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Exposure to high solar radiation reduces self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors. / Otani, Hidenori; Kaya, Mitsuharu; Tamaki, Akira; Goto, Heita; Maughan, Ronald J.

In: Physiology & Behavior, Vol. In press, 22.11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Otani, H, Kaya, M, Tamaki, A, Goto, H & Maughan, RJ 2018, 'Exposure to high solar radiation reduces self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors', Physiology & Behavior, vol. In press. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.11.029

APA

Otani, H., Kaya, M., Tamaki, A., Goto, H., & Maughan, R. J. (2018). Exposure to high solar radiation reduces self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors. Physiology & Behavior, In press. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.11.029

Vancouver

Otani H, Kaya M, Tamaki A, Goto H, Maughan RJ. Exposure to high solar radiation reduces self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors. Physiology & Behavior. 2018 Nov 22;In press. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.11.029

Author

Otani, Hidenori ; Kaya, Mitsuharu ; Tamaki, Akira ; Goto, Heita ; Maughan, Ronald J. / Exposure to high solar radiation reduces self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors. In: Physiology & Behavior. 2018 ; Vol. In press.

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@article{88e2f6f586e34af78347de0067817e82,
title = "Exposure to high solar radiation reduces self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors",
abstract = "High radiant heat load reduces endurance exercise performance in the heat indoors, but this remains unconfirmed in outdoor exercise. The current study investigated the effects of variations in solar radiation on self-regulated exercise intensity and thermoregulatory responses in the heat outdoors at a fixed rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Ten male participants completed 45-min cycling exercise in hot outdoor environments (about 31 °C) at a freely chosen resistance and cadence at an RPE of 13 (somewhat hard). Participants were blinded to resistance, pedal cadence, distance and elapsed time and exercised at three sunlight exposure conditions: clear sky (mean ± SD: 1072 ± 91 W·m−2; HIGH); thin cloud (592 ± 32 W·m−2; MID); and thick cloud (306 ± 52 W·m−2; LOW). Power output (HIGH 96 ± 22 W; MID 103 ± 20 W; LOW 108 ± 20 W) and resistance were lower in HIGH than MID and LOW (P < .001). Pedal cadence was lower, the core-to-skin temperature gradient was narrower, body heat gain from the sun (SHG) was greater and thermal sensation was higher with increasing solar radiation and all variables were different between trials (P < .01). Mean skin temperature was higher in HIGH than MID and LOW (P < .01), but core temperature was similar between trials (P = .485). We conclude that self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors at a fixed RPE of somewhat hard is reduced with increasing solar radiation because of greater thermoregulatory strain, perceived thermal stress and SHG. This suggests that reduced self-selected exercise intensity during high solar radiation exposure in the heat may prevent excessive core temperature rise.",
keywords = "Body temperature, Exercise performance, Heat stress, Thermal sensation, Sunlight",
author = "Hidenori Otani and Mitsuharu Kaya and Akira Tamaki and Heita Goto and Maughan, {Ronald J.}",
year = "2018",
month = nov,
day = "22",
doi = "10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.11.029",
language = "English",
volume = "In press",
journal = "Physiology & Behavior",
issn = "0031-9384",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exposure to high solar radiation reduces self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors

AU - Otani, Hidenori

AU - Kaya, Mitsuharu

AU - Tamaki, Akira

AU - Goto, Heita

AU - Maughan, Ronald J.

PY - 2018/11/22

Y1 - 2018/11/22

N2 - High radiant heat load reduces endurance exercise performance in the heat indoors, but this remains unconfirmed in outdoor exercise. The current study investigated the effects of variations in solar radiation on self-regulated exercise intensity and thermoregulatory responses in the heat outdoors at a fixed rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Ten male participants completed 45-min cycling exercise in hot outdoor environments (about 31 °C) at a freely chosen resistance and cadence at an RPE of 13 (somewhat hard). Participants were blinded to resistance, pedal cadence, distance and elapsed time and exercised at three sunlight exposure conditions: clear sky (mean ± SD: 1072 ± 91 W·m−2; HIGH); thin cloud (592 ± 32 W·m−2; MID); and thick cloud (306 ± 52 W·m−2; LOW). Power output (HIGH 96 ± 22 W; MID 103 ± 20 W; LOW 108 ± 20 W) and resistance were lower in HIGH than MID and LOW (P < .001). Pedal cadence was lower, the core-to-skin temperature gradient was narrower, body heat gain from the sun (SHG) was greater and thermal sensation was higher with increasing solar radiation and all variables were different between trials (P < .01). Mean skin temperature was higher in HIGH than MID and LOW (P < .01), but core temperature was similar between trials (P = .485). We conclude that self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors at a fixed RPE of somewhat hard is reduced with increasing solar radiation because of greater thermoregulatory strain, perceived thermal stress and SHG. This suggests that reduced self-selected exercise intensity during high solar radiation exposure in the heat may prevent excessive core temperature rise.

AB - High radiant heat load reduces endurance exercise performance in the heat indoors, but this remains unconfirmed in outdoor exercise. The current study investigated the effects of variations in solar radiation on self-regulated exercise intensity and thermoregulatory responses in the heat outdoors at a fixed rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Ten male participants completed 45-min cycling exercise in hot outdoor environments (about 31 °C) at a freely chosen resistance and cadence at an RPE of 13 (somewhat hard). Participants were blinded to resistance, pedal cadence, distance and elapsed time and exercised at three sunlight exposure conditions: clear sky (mean ± SD: 1072 ± 91 W·m−2; HIGH); thin cloud (592 ± 32 W·m−2; MID); and thick cloud (306 ± 52 W·m−2; LOW). Power output (HIGH 96 ± 22 W; MID 103 ± 20 W; LOW 108 ± 20 W) and resistance were lower in HIGH than MID and LOW (P < .001). Pedal cadence was lower, the core-to-skin temperature gradient was narrower, body heat gain from the sun (SHG) was greater and thermal sensation was higher with increasing solar radiation and all variables were different between trials (P < .01). Mean skin temperature was higher in HIGH than MID and LOW (P < .01), but core temperature was similar between trials (P = .485). We conclude that self-regulated exercise intensity in the heat outdoors at a fixed RPE of somewhat hard is reduced with increasing solar radiation because of greater thermoregulatory strain, perceived thermal stress and SHG. This suggests that reduced self-selected exercise intensity during high solar radiation exposure in the heat may prevent excessive core temperature rise.

KW - Body temperature

KW - Exercise performance

KW - Heat stress

KW - Thermal sensation

KW - Sunlight

U2 - 10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.11.029

DO - 10.1016/j.physbeh.2018.11.029

M3 - Article

VL - In press

JO - Physiology & Behavior

JF - Physiology & Behavior

SN - 0031-9384

ER -

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