Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Extreme exposure to filtered far-UVC: a case study

Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issuepeer-review

DOI

Open Access permissions

Open

Standard

Extreme exposure to filtered far-UVC : a case study. / Eadie, Ewan; Barnard, Isla M.R.; Ibbotson, Sally H.; Wood, Kenneth.

In: Photochemistry and Photobiology, Vol. Early view, 03.02.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issuepeer-review

Harvard

Eadie, E, Barnard, IMR, Ibbotson, SH & Wood, K 2021, 'Extreme exposure to filtered far-UVC: a case study', Photochemistry and Photobiology, vol. Early view. https://doi.org/10.1111/php.13385

APA

Eadie, E., Barnard, I. M. R., Ibbotson, S. H., & Wood, K. (2021). Extreme exposure to filtered far-UVC: a case study. Photochemistry and Photobiology, Early view. https://doi.org/10.1111/php.13385

Vancouver

Eadie E, Barnard IMR, Ibbotson SH, Wood K. Extreme exposure to filtered far-UVC: a case study. Photochemistry and Photobiology. 2021 Feb 3;Early view. https://doi.org/10.1111/php.13385

Author

Eadie, Ewan ; Barnard, Isla M.R. ; Ibbotson, Sally H. ; Wood, Kenneth. / Extreme exposure to filtered far-UVC : a case study. In: Photochemistry and Photobiology. 2021 ; Vol. Early view.

Bibtex - Download

@article{7691add7e031492097e5a8af5320bbfa,
title = "Extreme exposure to filtered far-UVC: a case study",
abstract = "Far-UVC devices are being commercially sold as {"}safe for humans{"} for the inactivation of SARS-CoV-2, without supporting human safety data. We felt there was a need for rapid proof-of-concept human self-exposure, to inform future controlled research and promote informed discussion. A Fitzpatrick Skin Type II individual exposed their inner forearms to large radiant exposures from a filtered Krypton-Chloride (KrCl) far-UVC system (SafeZoneUVC, Ushio Inc., Tokyo, Japan) with peak emission at 222 nm. No visible skin changes were observed at 1,500 mJcm-2, whereas skin yellowing that appeared immediately and resolved within 24 hours occurred with a 6,000 mJcm-2 exposure. No erythema was observed at any time point with exposures up to 18,000 mJcm-2. These results combined with Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer computer modelling suggest that filtering longer ultraviolet wavelengths is critical for the human skin safety of far-UVC devices. This work also contributes to growing arguments for the exploration of exposure limit expansion, which would subsequently enable faster inactivation of viruses.",
author = "Ewan Eadie and Barnard, {Isla M.R.} and Ibbotson, {Sally H.} and Kenneth Wood",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
day = "3",
doi = "10.1111/php.13385",
language = "English",
volume = "Early view",
journal = "Photochemistry and Photobiology",
issn = "0031-8655",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Extreme exposure to filtered far-UVC

T2 - a case study

AU - Eadie, Ewan

AU - Barnard, Isla M.R.

AU - Ibbotson, Sally H.

AU - Wood, Kenneth

PY - 2021/2/3

Y1 - 2021/2/3

N2 - Far-UVC devices are being commercially sold as "safe for humans" for the inactivation of SARS-CoV-2, without supporting human safety data. We felt there was a need for rapid proof-of-concept human self-exposure, to inform future controlled research and promote informed discussion. A Fitzpatrick Skin Type II individual exposed their inner forearms to large radiant exposures from a filtered Krypton-Chloride (KrCl) far-UVC system (SafeZoneUVC, Ushio Inc., Tokyo, Japan) with peak emission at 222 nm. No visible skin changes were observed at 1,500 mJcm-2, whereas skin yellowing that appeared immediately and resolved within 24 hours occurred with a 6,000 mJcm-2 exposure. No erythema was observed at any time point with exposures up to 18,000 mJcm-2. These results combined with Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer computer modelling suggest that filtering longer ultraviolet wavelengths is critical for the human skin safety of far-UVC devices. This work also contributes to growing arguments for the exploration of exposure limit expansion, which would subsequently enable faster inactivation of viruses.

AB - Far-UVC devices are being commercially sold as "safe for humans" for the inactivation of SARS-CoV-2, without supporting human safety data. We felt there was a need for rapid proof-of-concept human self-exposure, to inform future controlled research and promote informed discussion. A Fitzpatrick Skin Type II individual exposed their inner forearms to large radiant exposures from a filtered Krypton-Chloride (KrCl) far-UVC system (SafeZoneUVC, Ushio Inc., Tokyo, Japan) with peak emission at 222 nm. No visible skin changes were observed at 1,500 mJcm-2, whereas skin yellowing that appeared immediately and resolved within 24 hours occurred with a 6,000 mJcm-2 exposure. No erythema was observed at any time point with exposures up to 18,000 mJcm-2. These results combined with Monte Carlo Radiative Transfer computer modelling suggest that filtering longer ultraviolet wavelengths is critical for the human skin safety of far-UVC devices. This work also contributes to growing arguments for the exploration of exposure limit expansion, which would subsequently enable faster inactivation of viruses.

U2 - 10.1111/php.13385

DO - 10.1111/php.13385

M3 - Special issue

VL - Early view

JO - Photochemistry and Photobiology

JF - Photochemistry and Photobiology

SN - 0031-8655

ER -

Related by author

  1. Computer modeling indicates dramatically less DNA damage from far-UVC krypton chloride lamps (222 nm) than from sunlight exposure

    Eadie, E., O’Mahoney, P., Finlayson, L., Barnard, I. R. M., Ibbotson, S. H. & Wood, K., 5 Jul 2021, (E-pub ahead of print) In: Photochemistry and Photobiology. Early View, 5 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

  2. Development of a predictive Monte Carlo radiative transfer model for ablative fractional skin lasers

    McMillan, L., O'Mahoney, P., Feng, K., Zhou, K., Barnard, I. R. M., Li, C., Ibbotson, S., Eadie, E., Brown, C. T. A. & Wood, K., Jul 2021, In: Lasers in Surgery and Medicine. 53, 5, p. 731-740 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Air disinfection with germicidal ultraviolet: for this pandemic and the next

    Bergman, R., Brenner, D., Buonanno, M., Eadie, E., Forbes, P. D., Jensen, P., Nardell, E. A., Sliney, D., Vincent, R., Welch, D. & Wood, K., 18 May 2021, In: Photochemistry and Photobiology. 97, 3, p. 464-465

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

  4. Minimal, superficial DNA damage in human skin from filtered far-ultraviolet C

    Hickerson, R. P., Conneely, M. J., Hirata Tsutsumi, S. K., Wood, K., Jackson, D. N., Ibbotson, S. H. & Eadie, E., 1 Mar 2021, In: British Journal of Dermatology. Early View, 2 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

  5. Photoionization feedback in turbulent molecular clouds

    Sartorio, N. S., Vandenbroucke, B., Falceta-Goncalves, D. & Wood, K., Jan 2021, In: Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 500, 2, p. 1833-1843 11 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Computer modeling indicates dramatically less DNA damage from far-UVC krypton chloride lamps (222 nm) than from sunlight exposure

    Eadie, E., O’Mahoney, P., Finlayson, L., Barnard, I. R. M., Ibbotson, S. H. & Wood, K., 5 Jul 2021, (E-pub ahead of print) In: Photochemistry and Photobiology. Early View, 5 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

  2. Air disinfection with germicidal ultraviolet: for this pandemic and the next

    Bergman, R., Brenner, D., Buonanno, M., Eadie, E., Forbes, P. D., Jensen, P., Nardell, E. A., Sliney, D., Vincent, R., Welch, D. & Wood, K., 18 May 2021, In: Photochemistry and Photobiology. 97, 3, p. 464-465

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

  3. Quantifying direct DNA damage in the basal layer of skin exposed to UV radiation from sunbeds

    Barnard, I. R. M., Tierney, P., Campbell, C. L., McMillan, L., Moseley, H., Eadie, E., Brown, C. T. A. & Wood, K., Sep 2018, In: Photochemistry and Photobiology. 94, 5, p. 1017-1025 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. A Quantitative Comparison of 5-Aminolaevulinic Acid- and Methyl Aminolevulinate-Induced Fluorescence, Photobleaching and Pain During Photodynamic Therapy

    Valentine, R. M., Ibbotson, S. H., Brown, C. T. A., Moseley, H. & Wood, K., Jan 2011, In: Photochemistry and Photobiology. 87, 1, p. 242-249 8 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 272465816

Top