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Facial skin coloration affects perceived health of human faces

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Facial skin coloration affects perceived health of human faces. / Stephen, Ian David; Law Smith, Miriam Jane; Stirrat, Michael Robert; Perrett, David Ian.

In: International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 30, No. 6, 12.2009, p. 845-857.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Stephen, ID, Law Smith, MJ, Stirrat, MR & Perrett, DI 2009, 'Facial skin coloration affects perceived health of human faces' International Journal of Primatology, vol 30, no. 6, pp. 845-857. DOI: 10.1007/s10764-009-9380-z

APA

Stephen, I. D., Law Smith, M. J., Stirrat, M. R., & Perrett, D. I. (2009). Facial skin coloration affects perceived health of human faces. International Journal of Primatology, 30(6), 845-857. DOI: 10.1007/s10764-009-9380-z

Vancouver

Stephen ID, Law Smith MJ, Stirrat MR, Perrett DI. Facial skin coloration affects perceived health of human faces. International Journal of Primatology. 2009 Dec;30(6):845-857. Available from, DOI: 10.1007/s10764-009-9380-z

Author

Stephen, Ian David; Law Smith, Miriam Jane; Stirrat, Michael Robert; Perrett, David Ian / Facial skin coloration affects perceived health of human faces.

In: International Journal of Primatology, Vol. 30, No. 6, 12.2009, p. 845-857.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{5bba3aa86d0b4638b0e59102b8ab84a5,
title = "Facial skin coloration affects perceived health of human faces",
abstract = "Numerous researchers have examined the effects of skin condition, including texture and color, on the perception of health, age, and attractiveness in human faces. They have focused on facial color distribution, homogeneity of pigmentation, or skin quality. We here investigate the role of overall skin color in determining perceptions of health from faces by allowing participants to manipulate the skin portions of color-calibrated Caucasian face photographs along CIELab color axes. To enhance healthy appearance, participants increased skin redness (a*), providing additional support for previous findings that skin blood color enhances the healthy appearance of faces. Participants also increased skin yellowness (b*) and lightness (L*), suggesting a role for high carotenoid and low melanin coloration in the healthy appearance of faces. The color preferences described here resemble the red and yellow color cues to health displayed by many species of nonhuman animals.",
keywords = "Beauty, Diet, Flushing, Hemoglobin, UV protection",
author = "Stephen, {Ian David} and {Law Smith}, {Miriam Jane} and Stirrat, {Michael Robert} and Perrett, {David Ian}",
note = "I stephen was funded by a BBSRC Studentship. M Stirrat was funded by an EPSRC Studentship.",
year = "2009",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1007/s10764-009-9380-z",
volume = "30",
pages = "845--857",
journal = "International Journal of Primatology",
issn = "0164-0291",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Facial skin coloration affects perceived health of human faces

AU - Stephen,Ian David

AU - Law Smith,Miriam Jane

AU - Stirrat,Michael Robert

AU - Perrett,David Ian

N1 - I stephen was funded by a BBSRC Studentship. M Stirrat was funded by an EPSRC Studentship.

PY - 2009/12

Y1 - 2009/12

N2 - Numerous researchers have examined the effects of skin condition, including texture and color, on the perception of health, age, and attractiveness in human faces. They have focused on facial color distribution, homogeneity of pigmentation, or skin quality. We here investigate the role of overall skin color in determining perceptions of health from faces by allowing participants to manipulate the skin portions of color-calibrated Caucasian face photographs along CIELab color axes. To enhance healthy appearance, participants increased skin redness (a*), providing additional support for previous findings that skin blood color enhances the healthy appearance of faces. Participants also increased skin yellowness (b*) and lightness (L*), suggesting a role for high carotenoid and low melanin coloration in the healthy appearance of faces. The color preferences described here resemble the red and yellow color cues to health displayed by many species of nonhuman animals.

AB - Numerous researchers have examined the effects of skin condition, including texture and color, on the perception of health, age, and attractiveness in human faces. They have focused on facial color distribution, homogeneity of pigmentation, or skin quality. We here investigate the role of overall skin color in determining perceptions of health from faces by allowing participants to manipulate the skin portions of color-calibrated Caucasian face photographs along CIELab color axes. To enhance healthy appearance, participants increased skin redness (a*), providing additional support for previous findings that skin blood color enhances the healthy appearance of faces. Participants also increased skin yellowness (b*) and lightness (L*), suggesting a role for high carotenoid and low melanin coloration in the healthy appearance of faces. The color preferences described here resemble the red and yellow color cues to health displayed by many species of nonhuman animals.

KW - Beauty

KW - Diet

KW - Flushing

KW - Hemoglobin

KW - UV protection

U2 - 10.1007/s10764-009-9380-z

DO - 10.1007/s10764-009-9380-z

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 845

EP - 857

JO - International Journal of Primatology

T2 - International Journal of Primatology

JF - International Journal of Primatology

SN - 0164-0291

IS - 6

ER -

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