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Fan cells in layer 2 of lateral entorhinal cortex are critical for episodic-like memory

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Fan cells in layer 2 of lateral entorhinal cortex are critical for episodic-like memory. / Vandrey, Brianna Marie; Garden, Derek L.F.; Ambrozova, Veronika; McClure, Christina; Nolan, Matthew; Ainge, James Alexander.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 30, No. 1, e5, 06.01.2020, p. 169-175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Vandrey, BM, Garden, DLF, Ambrozova, V, McClure, C, Nolan, M & Ainge, JA 2020, 'Fan cells in layer 2 of lateral entorhinal cortex are critical for episodic-like memory', Current Biology, vol. 30, no. 1, e5, pp. 169-175. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2019.11.027

APA

Vandrey, B. M., Garden, D. L. F., Ambrozova, V., McClure, C., Nolan, M., & Ainge, J. A. (2020). Fan cells in layer 2 of lateral entorhinal cortex are critical for episodic-like memory. Current Biology, 30(1), 169-175. [e5]. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2019.11.027

Vancouver

Vandrey BM, Garden DLF, Ambrozova V, McClure C, Nolan M, Ainge JA. Fan cells in layer 2 of lateral entorhinal cortex are critical for episodic-like memory. Current Biology. 2020 Jan 6;30(1):169-175. e5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2019.11.027

Author

Vandrey, Brianna Marie ; Garden, Derek L.F. ; Ambrozova, Veronika ; McClure, Christina ; Nolan, Matthew ; Ainge, James Alexander. / Fan cells in layer 2 of lateral entorhinal cortex are critical for episodic-like memory. In: Current Biology. 2020 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 169-175.

Bibtex - Download

@article{bd15ef266dc44d2d8e0a3bb63885801a,
title = "Fan cells in layer 2 of lateral entorhinal cortex are critical for episodic-like memory",
abstract = "Episodic memory requires different types of information to be bound together to generate representations of experiences. The lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) and hippocampus are required for episodic-like memory in rodents [1, 2]. The LEC is critical for integrating spatial and contextual information about objects [2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. Further, LEC neurons encode objects in the environment and the locations where objects were previously experienced and generate representations of time during the encoding and retrieval of episodes [7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12]. However, it remains unclear how specific populations of cells within the LEC contribute to the integration of episodic memory components. Layer 2 (L2) of LEC manifests early pathology in Alzheimer{\textquoteright}s disease (AD) and related animal models [13, 14, 15, 16]. Projections to the hippocampus from L2 of LEC arise from fan cells in a superficial sub-layer (L2a) that are immunoreactive for reelin and project to the dentate gyrus [17, 18]. Here, we establish an approach for selectively targeting fan cells using Sim1:Cre mice. Whereas complete lesions of the LEC were previously found to abolish associative recognition memory [2, 3], we report that, after selective suppression of synaptic output from fan cells, mice can discriminate novel object-context configurations but are impaired in recognition of novel object-place-context associations. Our results suggest that memory functions are segregated between distinct LEC networks.",
keywords = "Recognition memory, Associative memory, Hippocampus, Alzheimer's, Medial entorhinal cortex, Object recognition, Fan cells, Lateral entorhinal cortex, Episodic memory",
author = "Vandrey, {Brianna Marie} and Garden, {Derek L.F.} and Veronika Ambrozova and Christina McClure and Matthew Nolan and Ainge, {James Alexander}",
note = "This work was supported by a Carnegie Trust Collaborative Research Grant to J.A. and M.F.N, a Henry Dryerre scholarship from the Royal Society of Edinburgh to B.V., and grants from Wellcome Trust (200855/Z/16/Z) to M.F.N, and BBSRC (BB/M025454/1) to M.F.N. ",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
day = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.cub.2019.11.027",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "169--175",
journal = "Current Biology",
issn = "0960-9822",
publisher = "Cell Press",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fan cells in layer 2 of lateral entorhinal cortex are critical for episodic-like memory

AU - Vandrey, Brianna Marie

AU - Garden, Derek L.F.

AU - Ambrozova, Veronika

AU - McClure, Christina

AU - Nolan, Matthew

AU - Ainge, James Alexander

N1 - This work was supported by a Carnegie Trust Collaborative Research Grant to J.A. and M.F.N, a Henry Dryerre scholarship from the Royal Society of Edinburgh to B.V., and grants from Wellcome Trust (200855/Z/16/Z) to M.F.N, and BBSRC (BB/M025454/1) to M.F.N.

PY - 2020/1/6

Y1 - 2020/1/6

N2 - Episodic memory requires different types of information to be bound together to generate representations of experiences. The lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) and hippocampus are required for episodic-like memory in rodents [1, 2]. The LEC is critical for integrating spatial and contextual information about objects [2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. Further, LEC neurons encode objects in the environment and the locations where objects were previously experienced and generate representations of time during the encoding and retrieval of episodes [7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12]. However, it remains unclear how specific populations of cells within the LEC contribute to the integration of episodic memory components. Layer 2 (L2) of LEC manifests early pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related animal models [13, 14, 15, 16]. Projections to the hippocampus from L2 of LEC arise from fan cells in a superficial sub-layer (L2a) that are immunoreactive for reelin and project to the dentate gyrus [17, 18]. Here, we establish an approach for selectively targeting fan cells using Sim1:Cre mice. Whereas complete lesions of the LEC were previously found to abolish associative recognition memory [2, 3], we report that, after selective suppression of synaptic output from fan cells, mice can discriminate novel object-context configurations but are impaired in recognition of novel object-place-context associations. Our results suggest that memory functions are segregated between distinct LEC networks.

AB - Episodic memory requires different types of information to be bound together to generate representations of experiences. The lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) and hippocampus are required for episodic-like memory in rodents [1, 2]. The LEC is critical for integrating spatial and contextual information about objects [2, 3, 4, 5, 6]. Further, LEC neurons encode objects in the environment and the locations where objects were previously experienced and generate representations of time during the encoding and retrieval of episodes [7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12]. However, it remains unclear how specific populations of cells within the LEC contribute to the integration of episodic memory components. Layer 2 (L2) of LEC manifests early pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related animal models [13, 14, 15, 16]. Projections to the hippocampus from L2 of LEC arise from fan cells in a superficial sub-layer (L2a) that are immunoreactive for reelin and project to the dentate gyrus [17, 18]. Here, we establish an approach for selectively targeting fan cells using Sim1:Cre mice. Whereas complete lesions of the LEC were previously found to abolish associative recognition memory [2, 3], we report that, after selective suppression of synaptic output from fan cells, mice can discriminate novel object-context configurations but are impaired in recognition of novel object-place-context associations. Our results suggest that memory functions are segregated between distinct LEC networks.

KW - Recognition memory

KW - Associative memory

KW - Hippocampus

KW - Alzheimer's

KW - Medial entorhinal cortex

KW - Object recognition

KW - Fan cells

KW - Lateral entorhinal cortex

KW - Episodic memory

U2 - 10.1016/j.cub.2019.11.027

DO - 10.1016/j.cub.2019.11.027

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 169

EP - 175

JO - Current Biology

JF - Current Biology

SN - 0960-9822

IS - 1

M1 - e5

ER -

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