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FatFonts: Combining the symbolic and visual aspects of numbers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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FatFonts : Combining the symbolic and visual aspects of numbers. / Nacenta, Miguel; Hinrichs, Uta; Carpendale, Sheelagh.

Proceedings of the International Working Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces. New York : ACM, 2012. p. 407-414.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Harvard

Nacenta, M, Hinrichs, U & Carpendale, S 2012, FatFonts: Combining the symbolic and visual aspects of numbers. in Proceedings of the International Working Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces. ACM, New York, pp. 407-414. https://doi.org/10.1145/2254556.2254636

APA

Nacenta, M., Hinrichs, U., & Carpendale, S. (2012). FatFonts: Combining the symbolic and visual aspects of numbers. In Proceedings of the International Working Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces (pp. 407-414). ACM. https://doi.org/10.1145/2254556.2254636

Vancouver

Nacenta M, Hinrichs U, Carpendale S. FatFonts: Combining the symbolic and visual aspects of numbers. In Proceedings of the International Working Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces. New York: ACM. 2012. p. 407-414 https://doi.org/10.1145/2254556.2254636

Author

Nacenta, Miguel ; Hinrichs, Uta ; Carpendale, Sheelagh. / FatFonts : Combining the symbolic and visual aspects of numbers. Proceedings of the International Working Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces. New York : ACM, 2012. pp. 407-414

Bibtex - Download

@inproceedings{7beb2165bb2b4797bfcbc3f45e54b49e,
title = "FatFonts: Combining the symbolic and visual aspects of numbers",
abstract = "In this paper we explore numeric typeface design for visualization purposes. We introduce FatFonts, a technique for visualizing quantitative data that bridges the gap between numeric and visual representations. FatFonts are based onArabic numerals but, unlike regular numeric typefaces, the amount of ink (dark pixels) used for each digit is proportional to its quantitative value. This enables accurate reading of the numerical data while preserving an overall visualcontext. We discuss the challenges of this approach that we identified through our design process and propose a set of design goals that include legibility, familiarity, readability, spatial precision, dynamic range, and resolution. Wecontribute four FatFont typefaces that are derived from our exploration of the design space that these goals introduce.Finally, we discuss three example scenarios that show how FatFonts can be used for visualization purposes as valuable representation alternatives.",
keywords = "Typography, Information Visualization, Number Systems, Redundant Encoding, Scalar Fields, Visual Data Encoding, Scientific Visualization",
author = "Miguel Nacenta and Uta Hinrichs and Sheelagh Carpendale",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1145/2254556.2254636",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781450312875",
pages = "407--414",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the International Working Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces",
publisher = "ACM",
address = "United States",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - GEN

T1 - FatFonts

T2 - Combining the symbolic and visual aspects of numbers

AU - Nacenta, Miguel

AU - Hinrichs, Uta

AU - Carpendale, Sheelagh

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - In this paper we explore numeric typeface design for visualization purposes. We introduce FatFonts, a technique for visualizing quantitative data that bridges the gap between numeric and visual representations. FatFonts are based onArabic numerals but, unlike regular numeric typefaces, the amount of ink (dark pixels) used for each digit is proportional to its quantitative value. This enables accurate reading of the numerical data while preserving an overall visualcontext. We discuss the challenges of this approach that we identified through our design process and propose a set of design goals that include legibility, familiarity, readability, spatial precision, dynamic range, and resolution. Wecontribute four FatFont typefaces that are derived from our exploration of the design space that these goals introduce.Finally, we discuss three example scenarios that show how FatFonts can be used for visualization purposes as valuable representation alternatives.

AB - In this paper we explore numeric typeface design for visualization purposes. We introduce FatFonts, a technique for visualizing quantitative data that bridges the gap between numeric and visual representations. FatFonts are based onArabic numerals but, unlike regular numeric typefaces, the amount of ink (dark pixels) used for each digit is proportional to its quantitative value. This enables accurate reading of the numerical data while preserving an overall visualcontext. We discuss the challenges of this approach that we identified through our design process and propose a set of design goals that include legibility, familiarity, readability, spatial precision, dynamic range, and resolution. Wecontribute four FatFont typefaces that are derived from our exploration of the design space that these goals introduce.Finally, we discuss three example scenarios that show how FatFonts can be used for visualization purposes as valuable representation alternatives.

KW - Typography

KW - Information Visualization

KW - Number Systems

KW - Redundant Encoding

KW - Scalar Fields

KW - Visual Data Encoding

KW - Scientific Visualization

UR - http://fatfonts.org

U2 - 10.1145/2254556.2254636

DO - 10.1145/2254556.2254636

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9781450312875

SP - 407

EP - 414

BT - Proceedings of the International Working Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces

PB - ACM

CY - New York

ER -

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ID: 38671270

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