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Field experiments with wild primates reveal no consistent dominance-based bias in social learning

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Field experiments with wild primates reveal no consistent dominance-based bias in social learning. / Botting, Jennifer; Whiten, Andrew; Grampp, Mathilde; van de Waal, Erica.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 136, 02.2018, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Botting, J, Whiten, A, Grampp, M & van de Waal, E 2018, 'Field experiments with wild primates reveal no consistent dominance-based bias in social learning', Animal Behaviour, vol. 136, pp. 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.11.025

APA

Botting, J., Whiten, A., Grampp, M., & van de Waal, E. (2018). Field experiments with wild primates reveal no consistent dominance-based bias in social learning. Animal Behaviour, 136, 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.11.025

Vancouver

Botting J, Whiten A, Grampp M, van de Waal E. Field experiments with wild primates reveal no consistent dominance-based bias in social learning. Animal Behaviour. 2018 Feb;136:1-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.11.025

Author

Botting, Jennifer ; Whiten, Andrew ; Grampp, Mathilde ; van de Waal, Erica. / Field experiments with wild primates reveal no consistent dominance-based bias in social learning. In: Animal Behaviour. 2018 ; Vol. 136. pp. 1-12.

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@article{7128ad534d644c8caa1bd484bfdca7bc,
title = "Field experiments with wild primates reveal no consistent dominance-based bias in social learning",
abstract = "Directed social learning suggests that information flows through social groups in a nonrandom way, with individuals biased to obtain information from certain conspecifics. A bias to copy the behaviour of more dominant individuals has been demonstrated in captive chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, but has yet to be studied in any wild animal population. To test for this bias using a field experiment, one dominant and one low-ranking female in each of three groups of wild vervet monkeys, Chlorocebus aethiops pygerythrus, was trained on alternative methods of opening an ‘artificial fruit’. Following 100 demonstrations from each model, fruits that could be opened either way were presented to each group and all openings were recorded. Overall, the dominant females were not attended to more than low-ranking females during the demonstrations, nor were their methods preferentially used in the test phase. We conclude that these monkeys show no overall bias to copy high-ranking models that would lead to a high-ranking model's behaviour becoming more prevalent in the group than a behaviour demonstrated by a low-ranking model. However, by contrast, there were significant effects of observer monkeys' rank and sex upon the likelihood they would match the dominant model. Additionally we found that the dominant models were more likely to stick to their initially learned method than were low-ranking models.",
keywords = "Dominance-based bias, Field experiment, Social attention, Social learning biases, Vervet monkey",
author = "Jennifer Botting and Andrew Whiten and Mathilde Grampp and {van de Waal}, Erica",
note = "This project was funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (grant number 31003A_159587) and Society in Science–Branco Weiss Fellowship to E.v.d.W and a John Templeton Foundation grant to A.W. and Kevin Laland (grant number ID40128).",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.11.025",
language = "English",
volume = "136",
pages = "1--12",
journal = "Animal Behaviour",
issn = "0003-3472",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Field experiments with wild primates reveal no consistent dominance-based bias in social learning

AU - Botting, Jennifer

AU - Whiten, Andrew

AU - Grampp, Mathilde

AU - van de Waal, Erica

N1 - This project was funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation (grant number 31003A_159587) and Society in Science–Branco Weiss Fellowship to E.v.d.W and a John Templeton Foundation grant to A.W. and Kevin Laland (grant number ID40128).

PY - 2018/2

Y1 - 2018/2

N2 - Directed social learning suggests that information flows through social groups in a nonrandom way, with individuals biased to obtain information from certain conspecifics. A bias to copy the behaviour of more dominant individuals has been demonstrated in captive chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, but has yet to be studied in any wild animal population. To test for this bias using a field experiment, one dominant and one low-ranking female in each of three groups of wild vervet monkeys, Chlorocebus aethiops pygerythrus, was trained on alternative methods of opening an ‘artificial fruit’. Following 100 demonstrations from each model, fruits that could be opened either way were presented to each group and all openings were recorded. Overall, the dominant females were not attended to more than low-ranking females during the demonstrations, nor were their methods preferentially used in the test phase. We conclude that these monkeys show no overall bias to copy high-ranking models that would lead to a high-ranking model's behaviour becoming more prevalent in the group than a behaviour demonstrated by a low-ranking model. However, by contrast, there were significant effects of observer monkeys' rank and sex upon the likelihood they would match the dominant model. Additionally we found that the dominant models were more likely to stick to their initially learned method than were low-ranking models.

AB - Directed social learning suggests that information flows through social groups in a nonrandom way, with individuals biased to obtain information from certain conspecifics. A bias to copy the behaviour of more dominant individuals has been demonstrated in captive chimpanzees, Pan troglodytes, but has yet to be studied in any wild animal population. To test for this bias using a field experiment, one dominant and one low-ranking female in each of three groups of wild vervet monkeys, Chlorocebus aethiops pygerythrus, was trained on alternative methods of opening an ‘artificial fruit’. Following 100 demonstrations from each model, fruits that could be opened either way were presented to each group and all openings were recorded. Overall, the dominant females were not attended to more than low-ranking females during the demonstrations, nor were their methods preferentially used in the test phase. We conclude that these monkeys show no overall bias to copy high-ranking models that would lead to a high-ranking model's behaviour becoming more prevalent in the group than a behaviour demonstrated by a low-ranking model. However, by contrast, there were significant effects of observer monkeys' rank and sex upon the likelihood they would match the dominant model. Additionally we found that the dominant models were more likely to stick to their initially learned method than were low-ranking models.

KW - Dominance-based bias

KW - Field experiment

KW - Social attention

KW - Social learning biases

KW - Vervet monkey

U2 - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.11.025

DO - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2017.11.025

M3 - Article

VL - 136

SP - 1

EP - 12

JO - Animal Behaviour

JF - Animal Behaviour

SN - 0003-3472

ER -

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