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Fitness consequences of female multiple mating: A direct test of indirect benefits

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Fitness consequences of female multiple mating : A direct test of indirect benefits. / Barbosa, Miguel; Connolly, Sean R; Hisano, Mizue; Dornelas, Maria; Magurran, Anne.

In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, Vol. 12, 185, 15.09.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Barbosa, M, Connolly, SR, Hisano, M, Dornelas, M & Magurran, A 2012, 'Fitness consequences of female multiple mating: A direct test of indirect benefits', BMC Evolutionary Biology, vol. 12, 185. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-12-185

APA

Barbosa, M., Connolly, S. R., Hisano, M., Dornelas, M., & Magurran, A. (2012). Fitness consequences of female multiple mating: A direct test of indirect benefits. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 12, [185]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-12-185

Vancouver

Barbosa M, Connolly SR, Hisano M, Dornelas M, Magurran A. Fitness consequences of female multiple mating: A direct test of indirect benefits. BMC Evolutionary Biology. 2012 Sep 15;12. 185. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2148-12-185

Author

Barbosa, Miguel ; Connolly, Sean R ; Hisano, Mizue ; Dornelas, Maria ; Magurran, Anne. / Fitness consequences of female multiple mating : A direct test of indirect benefits. In: BMC Evolutionary Biology. 2012 ; Vol. 12.

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@article{a87c8e83c0a84e17a63199e40d57bf0c,
title = "Fitness consequences of female multiple mating: A direct test of indirect benefits",
abstract = "BackgroundThe observation that females mate multiply when males provide nothing but sperm - which sexual selection theory suggests is unlikely to be limiting - continues to puzzle evolutionary biologists. Here we test the hypothesis that multiple mating is prevalent under such circumstances because it enhances female fitness. We do this by allowing female Trinidadian guppies to mate with either a single male or with multiple males, and then tracking the consequences of these matings across two generations.ResultsOverall, multiply mated females produced 67{\%} more F2 grand-offspring than singly mated females. These offspring, however, did not grow or mature faster, nor were they larger at birth, than F2 grand-offspring of singly mated females. Our results, however, show that multiple mating yields benefits to females in the form of an increase in the production of F1. The higher fecundity among multiply mated mothers was driven by greater production of sons but not daughters. However, contrary to expectation, individually, the offspring of multiply mated females do not grow at different rates than offspring of singly mated females, nor do any indirect fitness benefits or costs accrue to second-generation offspring.ConclusionsThe study provides strong evidence that multiple mating is advantageous to females, even when males contribute only sperm. This benefit is achieved through an increase in fecundity in the first generation, rather than through other fitness correlates such as size at birth, growth rate, time to sexual maturation and survival. Considered alongside previous work that female guppies can choose to mate with multiple partners, our results provide compelling evidence that direct fitness benefits underpin these mating decisions.",
keywords = "Selection, Fitness, Benefits, Sex ratio, Growth rate, Size at birth, Mate choice, Multiple mating",
author = "Miguel Barbosa and Connolly, {Sean R} and Mizue Hisano and Maria Dornelas and Anne Magurran",
year = "2012",
month = "9",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1186/1471-2148-12-185",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "BMC Evolutionary Biology",
issn = "1471-2148",
publisher = "BioMed Central",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fitness consequences of female multiple mating

T2 - A direct test of indirect benefits

AU - Barbosa, Miguel

AU - Connolly, Sean R

AU - Hisano, Mizue

AU - Dornelas, Maria

AU - Magurran, Anne

PY - 2012/9/15

Y1 - 2012/9/15

N2 - BackgroundThe observation that females mate multiply when males provide nothing but sperm - which sexual selection theory suggests is unlikely to be limiting - continues to puzzle evolutionary biologists. Here we test the hypothesis that multiple mating is prevalent under such circumstances because it enhances female fitness. We do this by allowing female Trinidadian guppies to mate with either a single male or with multiple males, and then tracking the consequences of these matings across two generations.ResultsOverall, multiply mated females produced 67% more F2 grand-offspring than singly mated females. These offspring, however, did not grow or mature faster, nor were they larger at birth, than F2 grand-offspring of singly mated females. Our results, however, show that multiple mating yields benefits to females in the form of an increase in the production of F1. The higher fecundity among multiply mated mothers was driven by greater production of sons but not daughters. However, contrary to expectation, individually, the offspring of multiply mated females do not grow at different rates than offspring of singly mated females, nor do any indirect fitness benefits or costs accrue to second-generation offspring.ConclusionsThe study provides strong evidence that multiple mating is advantageous to females, even when males contribute only sperm. This benefit is achieved through an increase in fecundity in the first generation, rather than through other fitness correlates such as size at birth, growth rate, time to sexual maturation and survival. Considered alongside previous work that female guppies can choose to mate with multiple partners, our results provide compelling evidence that direct fitness benefits underpin these mating decisions.

AB - BackgroundThe observation that females mate multiply when males provide nothing but sperm - which sexual selection theory suggests is unlikely to be limiting - continues to puzzle evolutionary biologists. Here we test the hypothesis that multiple mating is prevalent under such circumstances because it enhances female fitness. We do this by allowing female Trinidadian guppies to mate with either a single male or with multiple males, and then tracking the consequences of these matings across two generations.ResultsOverall, multiply mated females produced 67% more F2 grand-offspring than singly mated females. These offspring, however, did not grow or mature faster, nor were they larger at birth, than F2 grand-offspring of singly mated females. Our results, however, show that multiple mating yields benefits to females in the form of an increase in the production of F1. The higher fecundity among multiply mated mothers was driven by greater production of sons but not daughters. However, contrary to expectation, individually, the offspring of multiply mated females do not grow at different rates than offspring of singly mated females, nor do any indirect fitness benefits or costs accrue to second-generation offspring.ConclusionsThe study provides strong evidence that multiple mating is advantageous to females, even when males contribute only sperm. This benefit is achieved through an increase in fecundity in the first generation, rather than through other fitness correlates such as size at birth, growth rate, time to sexual maturation and survival. Considered alongside previous work that female guppies can choose to mate with multiple partners, our results provide compelling evidence that direct fitness benefits underpin these mating decisions.

KW - Selection

KW - Fitness

KW - Benefits

KW - Sex ratio

KW - Growth rate

KW - Size at birth

KW - Mate choice

KW - Multiple mating

U2 - 10.1186/1471-2148-12-185

DO - 10.1186/1471-2148-12-185

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - BMC Evolutionary Biology

JF - BMC Evolutionary Biology

SN - 1471-2148

M1 - 185

ER -

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