Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Fluvio-deltaic avulsions during relative sea-level fall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

DOI

Standard

Fluvio-deltaic avulsions during relative sea-level fall. / Nijhuis, A.G.; Edmonds, D.A.; Caldwell, R.L.; Cederberg, J.A.; Slingerland, R.L.; Best, J.L.; Parsons, D.R.; Robinson, Ruth Alison Joyce.

In: Geology, Vol. 43, No. 8, 08.2015, p. 719-722.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Nijhuis, AG, Edmonds, DA, Caldwell, RL, Cederberg, JA, Slingerland, RL, Best, JL, Parsons, DR & Robinson, RAJ 2015, 'Fluvio-deltaic avulsions during relative sea-level fall', Geology, vol. 43, no. 8, pp. 719-722. https://doi.org/10.1130/G36788.1

APA

Nijhuis, A. G., Edmonds, D. A., Caldwell, R. L., Cederberg, J. A., Slingerland, R. L., Best, J. L., Parsons, D. R., & Robinson, R. A. J. (2015). Fluvio-deltaic avulsions during relative sea-level fall. Geology, 43(8), 719-722. https://doi.org/10.1130/G36788.1

Vancouver

Nijhuis AG, Edmonds DA, Caldwell RL, Cederberg JA, Slingerland RL, Best JL et al. Fluvio-deltaic avulsions during relative sea-level fall. Geology. 2015 Aug;43(8):719-722. https://doi.org/10.1130/G36788.1

Author

Nijhuis, A.G. ; Edmonds, D.A. ; Caldwell, R.L. ; Cederberg, J.A. ; Slingerland, R.L. ; Best, J.L. ; Parsons, D.R. ; Robinson, Ruth Alison Joyce. / Fluvio-deltaic avulsions during relative sea-level fall. In: Geology. 2015 ; Vol. 43, No. 8. pp. 719-722.

Bibtex - Download

@article{3d096fdfcb4f4068815c38deb6c93f85,
title = "Fluvio-deltaic avulsions during relative sea-level fall",
abstract = "Understanding river response to changes in relative sea level (RSL) is essential for predicting fluvial stratigraphy and source-to-sink dynamics. Recent theoretical work has suggested that rivers can remain aggradational during RSL fall, but field data are needed to verify this response and investigate sediment deposition processes. We show with field work and modeling that fluvio-deltaic systems can remain aggradational or at grade during RSL fall, leading to superelevation and continuation of delta lobe avulsions. The field site is the Goose River, Newfoundland-Labrador, Canada, which has experienced steady RSL fall of around 3-4 mm yr-1 in the past 5 k.y. from post-glacial isostatic rebound. Elevation analysis and optically stimulated luminescence dating suggest that the Goose River avulsed and deposited three delta lobes during RSL fall. Simulation results from Delft3D software show that if the characteristic fluvial response time is longer than the duration of RSL fall, then fluvial systems remain aggradational or at grade, and continue to avulse during RSL fall due to superelevation. Intriguingly, we find that avulsions become more frequent at faster rates of RSL fall, provided the system response time remains longer than the duration of RSL fall. This work suggests that RSL fall rate may influence the architecture of falling-stage or forced regression deposits by controlling the number of deposited delta lobes.",
author = "A.G. Nijhuis and D.A. Edmonds and R.L. Caldwell and J.A. Cederberg and R.L. Slingerland and J.L. Best and D.R. Parsons and Robinson, {Ruth Alison Joyce}",
note = "This research was funded by National Science Foundation grants OCE-1061380 and EAR-1249330 awarded to Edmonds and grant OCE-1061495 awarded to Slingerland, the Jack and Richard Threet chair funds to Best, and a Geological Society of America student research grant to Nijhuis. ",
year = "2015",
month = aug,
doi = "10.1130/G36788.1",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "719--722",
journal = "Geology",
issn = "0091-7613",
publisher = "GEOLOGICAL SOC AMER, INC",
number = "8",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fluvio-deltaic avulsions during relative sea-level fall

AU - Nijhuis, A.G.

AU - Edmonds, D.A.

AU - Caldwell, R.L.

AU - Cederberg, J.A.

AU - Slingerland, R.L.

AU - Best, J.L.

AU - Parsons, D.R.

AU - Robinson, Ruth Alison Joyce

N1 - This research was funded by National Science Foundation grants OCE-1061380 and EAR-1249330 awarded to Edmonds and grant OCE-1061495 awarded to Slingerland, the Jack and Richard Threet chair funds to Best, and a Geological Society of America student research grant to Nijhuis.

PY - 2015/8

Y1 - 2015/8

N2 - Understanding river response to changes in relative sea level (RSL) is essential for predicting fluvial stratigraphy and source-to-sink dynamics. Recent theoretical work has suggested that rivers can remain aggradational during RSL fall, but field data are needed to verify this response and investigate sediment deposition processes. We show with field work and modeling that fluvio-deltaic systems can remain aggradational or at grade during RSL fall, leading to superelevation and continuation of delta lobe avulsions. The field site is the Goose River, Newfoundland-Labrador, Canada, which has experienced steady RSL fall of around 3-4 mm yr-1 in the past 5 k.y. from post-glacial isostatic rebound. Elevation analysis and optically stimulated luminescence dating suggest that the Goose River avulsed and deposited three delta lobes during RSL fall. Simulation results from Delft3D software show that if the characteristic fluvial response time is longer than the duration of RSL fall, then fluvial systems remain aggradational or at grade, and continue to avulse during RSL fall due to superelevation. Intriguingly, we find that avulsions become more frequent at faster rates of RSL fall, provided the system response time remains longer than the duration of RSL fall. This work suggests that RSL fall rate may influence the architecture of falling-stage or forced regression deposits by controlling the number of deposited delta lobes.

AB - Understanding river response to changes in relative sea level (RSL) is essential for predicting fluvial stratigraphy and source-to-sink dynamics. Recent theoretical work has suggested that rivers can remain aggradational during RSL fall, but field data are needed to verify this response and investigate sediment deposition processes. We show with field work and modeling that fluvio-deltaic systems can remain aggradational or at grade during RSL fall, leading to superelevation and continuation of delta lobe avulsions. The field site is the Goose River, Newfoundland-Labrador, Canada, which has experienced steady RSL fall of around 3-4 mm yr-1 in the past 5 k.y. from post-glacial isostatic rebound. Elevation analysis and optically stimulated luminescence dating suggest that the Goose River avulsed and deposited three delta lobes during RSL fall. Simulation results from Delft3D software show that if the characteristic fluvial response time is longer than the duration of RSL fall, then fluvial systems remain aggradational or at grade, and continue to avulse during RSL fall due to superelevation. Intriguingly, we find that avulsions become more frequent at faster rates of RSL fall, provided the system response time remains longer than the duration of RSL fall. This work suggests that RSL fall rate may influence the architecture of falling-stage or forced regression deposits by controlling the number of deposited delta lobes.

U2 - 10.1130/G36788.1

DO - 10.1130/G36788.1

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84942251452

VL - 43

SP - 719

EP - 722

JO - Geology

JF - Geology

SN - 0091-7613

IS - 8

ER -

Related by journal

  1. Geology (Journal)

    Chris Hawkesworth (Member of editorial board)

    20042008

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Geology (Journal)

    Michael Ian Bird (Member of editorial board)

    2000 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Hydrothermal recycling of sedimentary ammonium into oceanic crust and the Archean ocean at 3.24 Ga

    Stueeken, E. E., Boocock, T. J., Robinson, A., Mikhail, S. & Johnson, B., 8 Apr 2021, In: Geology. First Online, 5 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Biomediation of submarine sediment gravity flow dynamics

    Craig, M. J., Baas, J. H., Amos, K. J., Strachan, L. J., Manning, A. J., Paterson, D. M., Hope, J. A., Nodder, S. D. & Baker, M. L., Jan 2020, In: Geology. 48, 1, p. 72-76

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Ocean acidification during the early Toarcian extinction event: evidence from boron isotopes in brachiopods

    Müller, T., Jurikova, H., Gutjahr, M., Tomašových, A., Schlögl, J., Liebetrau, V., Duarte, L., Milovský, R., Suan, G., Mattioli, E., Pittet, B. & Eisenhauer, A., 13 Aug 2020, In: Geology. Early View, 5 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Sediment dynamics across gravel-sand transitions: implications for river stability and floodplain recycling

    Dingle, E., Sinclair, H., Venditti, J., Attal, M., Kinnaird, T. C., Creed, M., Quick, L., Nittrouer, J. & Gautam, D., 1 May 2020, In: Geology. 48, 5, p. 468-472

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. The Palaeoproterozoic Francevillian succession of Gabon and the Lomagundi-Jatuli event

    Bakakas, K., Moussavou, M., Prave, A. R., Lepland, A., Mbina, M. & Kirsimäe, K., 21 Jul 2020, In: Geology. Early View, 6 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 228659921

Top