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For better or for worse mental health? The role of family networks in exogamous unions

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For better or for worse mental health? The role of family networks in exogamous unions. / Eibich, Peter; Liu, Chia.

In: Population, Space and Place, Vol. Early View, e2437, 02.02.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Eibich, P & Liu, C 2021, 'For better or for worse mental health? The role of family networks in exogamous unions', Population, Space and Place, vol. Early View, e2437. https://doi.org/10.1002/psp.2437

APA

Eibich, P., & Liu, C. (2021). For better or for worse mental health? The role of family networks in exogamous unions. Population, Space and Place, Early View, [e2437]. https://doi.org/10.1002/psp.2437

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Eibich P, Liu C. For better or for worse mental health? The role of family networks in exogamous unions. Population, Space and Place. 2021 Feb 2;Early View. e2437. https://doi.org/10.1002/psp.2437

Author

Eibich, Peter ; Liu, Chia. / For better or for worse mental health? The role of family networks in exogamous unions. In: Population, Space and Place. 2021 ; Vol. Early View.

Bibtex - Download

@article{77b83d32c4bc44b1a23d16e4dfc35e4b,
title = "For better or for worse mental health?: The role of family networks in exogamous unions",
abstract = "This study tests whether being in an exogamous union affects older individual's family networks, and whether associations between exogamy and mental health reported in previous studies operate through changes in family ties and differ by gender. We focus on individuals aged 60 or above in the German Socio‐Economic Panel Study between 2002 and 2016. We describe demographic and family characteristics of individuals in different types of union and estimate correlated random effects models on the changes of mental health. Exogamous immigrants have larger family networks than endogamous immigrants due to a higher chance of having in‐laws nearby, while exogamous natives have smaller family networks than their endogamous counterparts. Native women in a union with immigrants exhibit worse mental health than endogamous native women, and the same disadvantage is held by immigrant men partnered with native women. Family networks influence mental health but contribute little to observed differences.",
keywords = "Aging, Exogamy, Germany, Mental Health, Migration",
author = "Peter Eibich and Chia Liu",
note = "Funder: H2020 European Research Council (Grant Number(s): 834103).",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1002/psp.2437",
language = "English",
volume = "Early View",
journal = "Population, Space and Place",
issn = "1544-8444",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - For better or for worse mental health?

T2 - The role of family networks in exogamous unions

AU - Eibich, Peter

AU - Liu, Chia

N1 - Funder: H2020 European Research Council (Grant Number(s): 834103).

PY - 2021/2/2

Y1 - 2021/2/2

N2 - This study tests whether being in an exogamous union affects older individual's family networks, and whether associations between exogamy and mental health reported in previous studies operate through changes in family ties and differ by gender. We focus on individuals aged 60 or above in the German Socio‐Economic Panel Study between 2002 and 2016. We describe demographic and family characteristics of individuals in different types of union and estimate correlated random effects models on the changes of mental health. Exogamous immigrants have larger family networks than endogamous immigrants due to a higher chance of having in‐laws nearby, while exogamous natives have smaller family networks than their endogamous counterparts. Native women in a union with immigrants exhibit worse mental health than endogamous native women, and the same disadvantage is held by immigrant men partnered with native women. Family networks influence mental health but contribute little to observed differences.

AB - This study tests whether being in an exogamous union affects older individual's family networks, and whether associations between exogamy and mental health reported in previous studies operate through changes in family ties and differ by gender. We focus on individuals aged 60 or above in the German Socio‐Economic Panel Study between 2002 and 2016. We describe demographic and family characteristics of individuals in different types of union and estimate correlated random effects models on the changes of mental health. Exogamous immigrants have larger family networks than endogamous immigrants due to a higher chance of having in‐laws nearby, while exogamous natives have smaller family networks than their endogamous counterparts. Native women in a union with immigrants exhibit worse mental health than endogamous native women, and the same disadvantage is held by immigrant men partnered with native women. Family networks influence mental health but contribute little to observed differences.

KW - Aging

KW - Exogamy

KW - Germany

KW - Mental Health

KW - Migration

U2 - 10.1002/psp.2437

DO - 10.1002/psp.2437

M3 - Article

VL - Early View

JO - Population, Space and Place

JF - Population, Space and Place

SN - 1544-8444

M1 - e2437

ER -

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