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Forgiveness and Christian character: reconciliation, exemplarism and the shape of moral theology

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Forgiveness and Christian character : reconciliation, exemplarism and the shape of moral theology. / Torrance, Alan J.

In: Studies in Christian Ethics, Vol. 30, No. 3, 08.2017, p. 293-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Torrance, AJ 2017, 'Forgiveness and Christian character: reconciliation, exemplarism and the shape of moral theology' Studies in Christian Ethics, vol. 30, no. 3, pp. 293-313. DOI: 10.1177/0953946817701046

APA

Torrance, A. J. (2017). Forgiveness and Christian character: reconciliation, exemplarism and the shape of moral theology. DOI: 10.1177/0953946817701046

Vancouver

Torrance AJ. Forgiveness and Christian character: reconciliation, exemplarism and the shape of moral theology. Studies in Christian Ethics. 2017 Aug;30(3):293-313. Available from, DOI: 10.1177/0953946817701046

Author

Torrance, Alan J./ Forgiveness and Christian character : reconciliation, exemplarism and the shape of moral theology. In: Studies in Christian Ethics. 2017 ; Vol. 30, No. 3. pp. 293-313

Bibtex - Download

@article{48a52082585e45e1aaa680a8a1a10f2b,
title = "Forgiveness and Christian character: reconciliation, exemplarism and the shape of moral theology",
abstract = "Acts of Christian forgiveness that run counter to natural inclinations and ethical intuitions raise questions about the nature of human identity and the basis of moral theology. An assessment of the biblical and theological warrant for Christian forgiveness challenges the ethical misappropriation of the language of covenant, torah and righteousness to that of contract, law and justice. The argument is made that forgiveness should be seen as normative - indeed, obligatory rather than supererogatory. A theological account is then provided of the conditions under which our natural inclinations are transformed so as to facilitate an orientation of forgiveness. It is argued that the doctrines of the incarnation and human participation in the mind of Christ (where transformation is conceived as both 'evangelical' and 'ecclesial') are axiomatic for interpreting the Christian life and thus moral theology. This leads to the conclusion that a combination of 'reconciled exemplarism' and 'semantic externalism' is key to the exposition of Christian ethics - the language of which tracks God's historical engagement with humanity rather than denoting immanent, ethical categories.",
keywords = "Forgiveness, Transformation, Covenant , Law, Reconciliation, Exemplarism, Semantic externalism",
author = "Torrance, {Alan J.}",
note = "This work was funded through the Character Project and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, on the one hand, and the Logos Institute and the Templeton Religion Trust, on the other.",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1177/0953946817701046",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "293--313",
journal = "Studies in Christian Ethics",
issn = "0953-9468",
publisher = "Sage",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Forgiveness and Christian character

T2 - Studies in Christian Ethics

AU - Torrance,Alan J.

N1 - This work was funded through the Character Project and the Templeton World Charity Foundation, on the one hand, and the Logos Institute and the Templeton Religion Trust, on the other.

PY - 2017/8

Y1 - 2017/8

N2 - Acts of Christian forgiveness that run counter to natural inclinations and ethical intuitions raise questions about the nature of human identity and the basis of moral theology. An assessment of the biblical and theological warrant for Christian forgiveness challenges the ethical misappropriation of the language of covenant, torah and righteousness to that of contract, law and justice. The argument is made that forgiveness should be seen as normative - indeed, obligatory rather than supererogatory. A theological account is then provided of the conditions under which our natural inclinations are transformed so as to facilitate an orientation of forgiveness. It is argued that the doctrines of the incarnation and human participation in the mind of Christ (where transformation is conceived as both 'evangelical' and 'ecclesial') are axiomatic for interpreting the Christian life and thus moral theology. This leads to the conclusion that a combination of 'reconciled exemplarism' and 'semantic externalism' is key to the exposition of Christian ethics - the language of which tracks God's historical engagement with humanity rather than denoting immanent, ethical categories.

AB - Acts of Christian forgiveness that run counter to natural inclinations and ethical intuitions raise questions about the nature of human identity and the basis of moral theology. An assessment of the biblical and theological warrant for Christian forgiveness challenges the ethical misappropriation of the language of covenant, torah and righteousness to that of contract, law and justice. The argument is made that forgiveness should be seen as normative - indeed, obligatory rather than supererogatory. A theological account is then provided of the conditions under which our natural inclinations are transformed so as to facilitate an orientation of forgiveness. It is argued that the doctrines of the incarnation and human participation in the mind of Christ (where transformation is conceived as both 'evangelical' and 'ecclesial') are axiomatic for interpreting the Christian life and thus moral theology. This leads to the conclusion that a combination of 'reconciled exemplarism' and 'semantic externalism' is key to the exposition of Christian ethics - the language of which tracks God's historical engagement with humanity rather than denoting immanent, ethical categories.

KW - Forgiveness

KW - Transformation

KW - Covenant

KW - Law

KW - Reconciliation

KW - Exemplarism

KW - Semantic externalism

U2 - 10.1177/0953946817701046

DO - 10.1177/0953946817701046

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 293

EP - 313

JO - Studies in Christian Ethics

JF - Studies in Christian Ethics

SN - 0953-9468

IS - 3

ER -

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ID: 249811529