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Fourteen-month-olds know what "We" have shared in a special way

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Fourteen-month-olds know what "We" have shared in a special way. / Moll, Henrike; Richter, Nadja; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael.

In: Infancy, Vol. 13, No. 1, 2008, p. 90-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Moll, H, Richter, N, Carpenter, M & Tomasello, M 2008, 'Fourteen-month-olds know what "We" have shared in a special way', Infancy, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 90-101. https://doi.org/10.1080/15250000701779402

APA

Moll, H., Richter, N., Carpenter, M., & Tomasello, M. (2008). Fourteen-month-olds know what "We" have shared in a special way. Infancy, 13(1), 90-101. https://doi.org/10.1080/15250000701779402

Vancouver

Moll H, Richter N, Carpenter M, Tomasello M. Fourteen-month-olds know what "We" have shared in a special way. Infancy. 2008;13(1):90-101. https://doi.org/10.1080/15250000701779402

Author

Moll, Henrike ; Richter, Nadja ; Carpenter, Malinda ; Tomasello, Michael. / Fourteen-month-olds know what "We" have shared in a special way. In: Infancy. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 90-101.

Bibtex - Download

@article{5ec4d9cb397948428eb1f78c12f54eb0,
title = "Fourteen-month-olds know what {"}We{"} have shared in a special way",
abstract = "People often express excitement to each other when encountering an object that they have shared together previously in some special way. This study investigated whether 14-month-old infants know precisely what they have and have not shared in a special way (and with whom). In the experimental condition an adult and infant shared an object (the target) excitedly because it unexpectedly reappeared in several places. They then shared 2 other objects (the distractors) in a more normal fashion. Later, the adult reacted excitedly to a tray containing all 3 objects and then made an ambiguous request for the infant to hand {"}it{"} to her. There were 2 control conditions. In I of them, a different adult, who knew none of the 3 objects, made the ambiguous request. In the other control condition, the adult who made the request had previously experienced the objects only alone, while the infant looked on unengaged. Infants in the experimental condition chose the target object more often than the distractors and more often than they chose it in either control condition. These results demonstrate that 14-month-old infants can identify which one of a set of objects {"}we{"}-and not just I or you alone-have had a special experience with in the past.",
keywords = "18-MONTH-OLDS KNOW, OTHERS, ATTENTION, INFANT",
author = "Henrike Moll and Nadja Richter and Malinda Carpenter and Michael Tomasello",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1080/15250000701779402",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "90--101",
journal = "Infancy",
issn = "1525-0008",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fourteen-month-olds know what "We" have shared in a special way

AU - Moll, Henrike

AU - Richter, Nadja

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

AU - Tomasello, Michael

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - People often express excitement to each other when encountering an object that they have shared together previously in some special way. This study investigated whether 14-month-old infants know precisely what they have and have not shared in a special way (and with whom). In the experimental condition an adult and infant shared an object (the target) excitedly because it unexpectedly reappeared in several places. They then shared 2 other objects (the distractors) in a more normal fashion. Later, the adult reacted excitedly to a tray containing all 3 objects and then made an ambiguous request for the infant to hand "it" to her. There were 2 control conditions. In I of them, a different adult, who knew none of the 3 objects, made the ambiguous request. In the other control condition, the adult who made the request had previously experienced the objects only alone, while the infant looked on unengaged. Infants in the experimental condition chose the target object more often than the distractors and more often than they chose it in either control condition. These results demonstrate that 14-month-old infants can identify which one of a set of objects "we"-and not just I or you alone-have had a special experience with in the past.

AB - People often express excitement to each other when encountering an object that they have shared together previously in some special way. This study investigated whether 14-month-old infants know precisely what they have and have not shared in a special way (and with whom). In the experimental condition an adult and infant shared an object (the target) excitedly because it unexpectedly reappeared in several places. They then shared 2 other objects (the distractors) in a more normal fashion. Later, the adult reacted excitedly to a tray containing all 3 objects and then made an ambiguous request for the infant to hand "it" to her. There were 2 control conditions. In I of them, a different adult, who knew none of the 3 objects, made the ambiguous request. In the other control condition, the adult who made the request had previously experienced the objects only alone, while the infant looked on unengaged. Infants in the experimental condition chose the target object more often than the distractors and more often than they chose it in either control condition. These results demonstrate that 14-month-old infants can identify which one of a set of objects "we"-and not just I or you alone-have had a special experience with in the past.

KW - 18-MONTH-OLDS KNOW

KW - OTHERS

KW - ATTENTION

KW - INFANT

U2 - 10.1080/15250000701779402

DO - 10.1080/15250000701779402

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 90

EP - 101

JO - Infancy

JF - Infancy

SN - 1525-0008

IS - 1

ER -

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