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Fraping, social norms and online representations of self

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

Wendy Moncur, Kathryn M. Orzech, Fergus Gilmour Neville

School/Research organisations

Abstract

This paper reports on qualitative insights generated from 46 semi-structured interviews with adults ranging in age from 18 to 70. It focuses on an online social behaviour, ‘fraping’, which involves the unauthorised alteration of content on a person's social networking site (SNS) profile by a third party. Our exploratory research elucidates what constitutes a frape, who is involved in it, and what the social norms surrounding the activity are. We provide insights into how frape contributes to online sociality and the co-construction of online identity, and identify opportunities for further work in understanding the interplay between online social identities, social groups and social norms.
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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-131
Number of pages7
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume63
Early online date20 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016

    Research areas

  • Fraping, Social media, Social norms, Social identity, Teenagers, Young adults

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