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Growth in body size of the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus)

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Growth in body size of the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus). / Winship, Arliss; Trites, A W; Calkins, D G.

In: Journal of Mammalogy, Vol. 82, 05.2001, p. 500-519.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Winship, A, Trites, AW & Calkins, DG 2001, 'Growth in body size of the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus)' Journal of Mammalogy, vol. 82, pp. 500-519. https://doi.org/10.1644/1545-1542(2001)082<0500:GIBSOT>2.0.CO;2

APA

Winship, A., Trites, A. W., & Calkins, D. G. (2001). Growth in body size of the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus). Journal of Mammalogy, 82, 500-519. https://doi.org/10.1644/1545-1542(2001)082<0500:GIBSOT>2.0.CO;2

Vancouver

Winship A, Trites AW, Calkins DG. Growth in body size of the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus). Journal of Mammalogy. 2001 May;82:500-519. https://doi.org/10.1644/1545-1542(2001)082<0500:GIBSOT>2.0.CO;2

Author

Winship, Arliss ; Trites, A W ; Calkins, D G. / Growth in body size of the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus). In: Journal of Mammalogy. 2001 ; Vol. 82. pp. 500-519.

Bibtex - Download

@article{8583f5667cbb457fa3730351dc711453,
title = "Growth in body size of the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus)",
abstract = "Growth models (mass and length) were constructed for male (greater than or equal to1 year old), female (greater than or equal to1 year old), and pregnant female Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) shot on rookeries or haulouts, or in coastal waters of southeastern Alaska, the Gulf of Alaska, or the Bering Sea ice edge between 1976 and 1989. The Richards model best described growth in body length and mass. Females with fetuses were 3 cm longer and 28 kg heavier on average than females of the same age without fetuses. Males grew in length over a longer period than did females and exhibited a growth spurt in mass that coincided with sexual maturity between 5 and 7 years of age. Average predicted standard lengths of males and females greater than or equal to 12 years of age were 3.04 and 2.32 m, respectively, and average predicted masses were 681 and 273 kg, respectively. Maximum recorded mass was 910 kg for an adult male. Males achieved 90{\%} of their asymptotic length and mass by 8 and 9 years of age, respectively, compared with 4 and 13 years, respectively, for females. Residuals of the size-at-age models indicated seasonal changes in growth rates. Young animals (<6, years old) and adult males grew little during the breeding season (May-July), and adult males did not resume growth until sometime after November.",
keywords = "Eumetopias jubatus, length, mass, seasonality, sexual size difference, Steller sea lion, NORTHERN FUR SEALS, HARP SEAL, PAGOPHILUS-GROENLANDICUS, ARCTOCEPHALUS-GAZELLA, TESTICULAR GROWTH, MASS, POPULATION, ALLOMETRY, ALASKA, GULF",
author = "Arliss Winship and Trites, {A W} and Calkins, {D G}",
year = "2001",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1644/1545-1542(2001)082&lt;0500:GIBSOT&gt;2.0.CO;2",
language = "English",
volume = "82",
pages = "500--519",
journal = "Journal of Mammalogy",
issn = "0022-2372",
publisher = "ALLIANCE COMMUNICATIONS GROUP DIVISION ALLEN PRESS",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Growth in body size of the Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus)

AU - Winship, Arliss

AU - Trites, A W

AU - Calkins, D G

PY - 2001/5

Y1 - 2001/5

N2 - Growth models (mass and length) were constructed for male (greater than or equal to1 year old), female (greater than or equal to1 year old), and pregnant female Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) shot on rookeries or haulouts, or in coastal waters of southeastern Alaska, the Gulf of Alaska, or the Bering Sea ice edge between 1976 and 1989. The Richards model best described growth in body length and mass. Females with fetuses were 3 cm longer and 28 kg heavier on average than females of the same age without fetuses. Males grew in length over a longer period than did females and exhibited a growth spurt in mass that coincided with sexual maturity between 5 and 7 years of age. Average predicted standard lengths of males and females greater than or equal to 12 years of age were 3.04 and 2.32 m, respectively, and average predicted masses were 681 and 273 kg, respectively. Maximum recorded mass was 910 kg for an adult male. Males achieved 90% of their asymptotic length and mass by 8 and 9 years of age, respectively, compared with 4 and 13 years, respectively, for females. Residuals of the size-at-age models indicated seasonal changes in growth rates. Young animals (<6, years old) and adult males grew little during the breeding season (May-July), and adult males did not resume growth until sometime after November.

AB - Growth models (mass and length) were constructed for male (greater than or equal to1 year old), female (greater than or equal to1 year old), and pregnant female Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) shot on rookeries or haulouts, or in coastal waters of southeastern Alaska, the Gulf of Alaska, or the Bering Sea ice edge between 1976 and 1989. The Richards model best described growth in body length and mass. Females with fetuses were 3 cm longer and 28 kg heavier on average than females of the same age without fetuses. Males grew in length over a longer period than did females and exhibited a growth spurt in mass that coincided with sexual maturity between 5 and 7 years of age. Average predicted standard lengths of males and females greater than or equal to 12 years of age were 3.04 and 2.32 m, respectively, and average predicted masses were 681 and 273 kg, respectively. Maximum recorded mass was 910 kg for an adult male. Males achieved 90% of their asymptotic length and mass by 8 and 9 years of age, respectively, compared with 4 and 13 years, respectively, for females. Residuals of the size-at-age models indicated seasonal changes in growth rates. Young animals (<6, years old) and adult males grew little during the breeding season (May-July), and adult males did not resume growth until sometime after November.

KW - Eumetopias jubatus

KW - length

KW - mass

KW - seasonality

KW - sexual size difference

KW - Steller sea lion

KW - NORTHERN FUR SEALS

KW - HARP SEAL

KW - PAGOPHILUS-GROENLANDICUS

KW - ARCTOCEPHALUS-GAZELLA

KW - TESTICULAR GROWTH

KW - MASS

KW - POPULATION

KW - ALLOMETRY

KW - ALASKA

KW - GULF

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034985562&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1644/1545-1542(2001)082&lt;0500:GIBSOT&gt;2.0.CO;2

DO - 10.1644/1545-1542(2001)082&lt;0500:GIBSOT&gt;2.0.CO;2

M3 - Article

VL - 82

SP - 500

EP - 519

JO - Journal of Mammalogy

T2 - Journal of Mammalogy

JF - Journal of Mammalogy

SN - 0022-2372

ER -

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ID: 373964