Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Herbivore-mediated negative frequency-dependent selection underlies a trichome dimorphism in nature

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

DOI

Open Access permissions

Open

Author(s)

Jay K. Goldberg, Curtis M. Lively, Sonya R. Sternlieb, Genevieve Pintel, J. Daniel Hare, Michael B. Morrissey, Lynda F. Delph

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Negative frequency‐dependent selection (NFDS) has been shown to maintain polymorphism in a diverse array of traits. The action of NFDS has been confirmed through modeling, experimental approaches, and genetic analyses. In this study, we investigated NFDS in the wild using morph‐frequency changes spanning a 20‐year period from over 30 dimorphic populations of Datura wrightii. In these populations, plants either possess glandular (sticky) or non‐glandular (velvety) trichomes, and the ratio of these morphs varies substantially among populations. Our method provided evidence that NFDS, rather than drift or migration, is the primary force maintaining this dimorphism. Most populations that were initially dimorphic remained dimorphic, and the overall mean and variance in morph frequency did not change over time. Furthermore, morph‐frequency differences were not related to geographic distances. Together, these results indicate that neither directional selection, drift, or migration played a substantial role in determining morph frequencies. However, as predicted by negative frequency‐dependent selection, we found that the rare morph tended to increase in frequency, leading to a negative relationship between the change in the frequency of the sticky morph and its initial frequency. In addition, we found that morph‐frequency change over time was significantly correlated with the damage inflicted by two herbivores: Lema daturaphila and Tupiochoris notatus. The latter is a specialist on the sticky morph and damage by this herbivore was greatest when the sticky morph was common. The reverse was true for L. daturaphila, such that damage increased with the frequency of the velvety morph. These findings suggest that these herbivores contribute to balancing selection on the observed trichome dimorphism.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages8
JournalEvolution Letters
VolumeEarly View
Early online date9 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 9 Jan 2020

    Research areas

  • Balanced polymorphism, Datura wrightii, Glandular trichomes, Plant–herbivore interactions

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Quantifying the causal pathways contributing to natural selection

    Henshaw, J. M., Morrissey, M. B. & Jones, A. G., 12 Oct 2020, In: Evolution. Early View, 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Revisiting advice on the analysis of count data

    Morrissey, M. B. & Ruxton, G. D., 26 Jul 2020, In: Methods in Ecology and Evolution. Early View, 8 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. The role of selection and evolution in changing parturition date in a red deer population

    Bonnet, T., Morrissey, M. B., Morris, A., Morris, S., Clutton-Brock, T. H., Pemberton, J. M. & Kruuk, L. E. B., 5 Nov 2019, In: PLoS Biology. 17, 11, 23 p., e3000493.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. A note on simulating null distributions for G matrix comparisons

    Morrissey, M. B., Hangartner, S. & Monro, K., 22 Oct 2019, In: Evolution. Early View

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. No evidence that warmer temperatures are associated with selection for smaller body sizes

    Siepielski, A. M., Morrissey, M. B., Carlson, S. M., Francis, C. D., Kingsolver, J. G., Whitney, K. D. & Kruuk, L. E. B., 24 Jul 2019, In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1907, 10 p., 20191332.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Evolution Letters (Journal)

    Andy Gardner (Member of editorial board)

    2020

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  2. Evolution Letters (Journal)

    Andy Gardner (Member of editorial board)

    2019

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  3. Evolution Letters (Journal)

    Andy Gardner (Member of editorial board)

    2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  4. Evolution Letters (Journal)

    Andy Gardner (Member of editorial board)

    2017 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

  5. Evolution Letters (Journal)

    Andy Gardner (Member of editorial board)

    2016 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

Related by journal

  1. Field cricket genome reveals the footprint of recent, abrupt adaptation in the wild

    Pascoal, S., Risse, J. E., Zhang, X., Blaxter, M., Cezard, T., Challis, R. J., Gharbi, K., Hunt, J., Kumar, S., Langan, E., Liu, X., Rayner, J. G., Ritchie, M. G., Snoek, B. L., Trivedi, U. & Bailey, N. W., 7 Feb 2020, In: Evolution Letters. 4, 1, p. 19-33 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Resource heterogeneity and the evolution of public-goods cooperation

    Stilwell, P., O'Brien, S., Hesse, E., Lowe, C., Gardner, A. & Buckling, A., 4 Feb 2020, In: Evolution Letters. Early View

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Extended haplodiploidy hypothesis

    Rautiala, P. T., Helanterä, H. & Puurtinen, M., Jun 2019, In: Evolution Letters. 3, 3, p. 263-270 8 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. How to make a haploid male

    Ross, L., Davies, N. & Gardner, A., 7 Mar 2019, In: Evolution Letters. Early View, 12 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 265731134

Top