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How fast is a snail’s pace? The influences of size and substrate on gastropod speed of locomotion

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

DOI

Standard

How fast is a snail’s pace? The influences of size and substrate on gastropod speed of locomotion. / Pembury Smith, M. Q. R.; Ruxton, G. D.

In: Journal of Zoology, Vol. Early View, 02.02.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Pembury Smith, MQR & Ruxton, GD 2021, 'How fast is a snail’s pace? The influences of size and substrate on gastropod speed of locomotion', Journal of Zoology, vol. Early View. https://doi.org/10.1111/jzo.12865

APA

Pembury Smith, M. Q. R., & Ruxton, G. D. (2021). How fast is a snail’s pace? The influences of size and substrate on gastropod speed of locomotion. Journal of Zoology, Early View. https://doi.org/10.1111/jzo.12865

Vancouver

Pembury Smith MQR, Ruxton GD. How fast is a snail’s pace? The influences of size and substrate on gastropod speed of locomotion. Journal of Zoology. 2021 Feb 2;Early View. https://doi.org/10.1111/jzo.12865

Author

Pembury Smith, M. Q. R. ; Ruxton, G. D. / How fast is a snail’s pace? The influences of size and substrate on gastropod speed of locomotion. In: Journal of Zoology. 2021 ; Vol. Early View.

Bibtex - Download

@article{f33dcf430c864590828ca114ed05de67,
title = "How fast is a snail{\textquoteright}s pace? The influences of size and substrate on gastropod speed of locomotion",
abstract = "Terrestrial gastropods display monotaxic direct crawling. During locomotion, smooth muscle contraction stimulates a series of pedal waves that move along the ventral surface of the foot. These waves interact with a thin layer of mucus produced by the foot, propelling the animal forward. Although the mechanism by which this process occurs has been well studied, less is known about how morphological or environmental factors affect this process, and ultimately how they may alter the speed of propulsion. In this study, we tested the influences of body size, substrate type, and substrate orientation on crawling speed in the terrestrial snail Cornu aspersum. We found that substrate texture and orientation had a strong effect on speed, whereas snail body size and the presence of a conspecific trail did not. Crawling speed across rough sandpaper was the most striking, showing a clear inversely proportional relationship between the size of abrasive particle and speed. We suggest that this may be the result of substrate attributes interfering with mucus adhesion or mucus production, subsequently affecting locomotion, although gait choice or the frequency and length of each pedal wave may also play a role.",
keywords = "Gastropod, Propulsion, Adhesive locomotion, Substrate, Size",
author = "{Pembury Smith}, {M. Q. R.} and Ruxton, {G. D.}",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
day = "2",
doi = "10.1111/jzo.12865",
language = "English",
volume = "Early View",
journal = "Journal of Zoology",
issn = "0952-8369",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - How fast is a snail’s pace? The influences of size and substrate on gastropod speed of locomotion

AU - Pembury Smith, M. Q. R.

AU - Ruxton, G. D.

PY - 2021/2/2

Y1 - 2021/2/2

N2 - Terrestrial gastropods display monotaxic direct crawling. During locomotion, smooth muscle contraction stimulates a series of pedal waves that move along the ventral surface of the foot. These waves interact with a thin layer of mucus produced by the foot, propelling the animal forward. Although the mechanism by which this process occurs has been well studied, less is known about how morphological or environmental factors affect this process, and ultimately how they may alter the speed of propulsion. In this study, we tested the influences of body size, substrate type, and substrate orientation on crawling speed in the terrestrial snail Cornu aspersum. We found that substrate texture and orientation had a strong effect on speed, whereas snail body size and the presence of a conspecific trail did not. Crawling speed across rough sandpaper was the most striking, showing a clear inversely proportional relationship between the size of abrasive particle and speed. We suggest that this may be the result of substrate attributes interfering with mucus adhesion or mucus production, subsequently affecting locomotion, although gait choice or the frequency and length of each pedal wave may also play a role.

AB - Terrestrial gastropods display monotaxic direct crawling. During locomotion, smooth muscle contraction stimulates a series of pedal waves that move along the ventral surface of the foot. These waves interact with a thin layer of mucus produced by the foot, propelling the animal forward. Although the mechanism by which this process occurs has been well studied, less is known about how morphological or environmental factors affect this process, and ultimately how they may alter the speed of propulsion. In this study, we tested the influences of body size, substrate type, and substrate orientation on crawling speed in the terrestrial snail Cornu aspersum. We found that substrate texture and orientation had a strong effect on speed, whereas snail body size and the presence of a conspecific trail did not. Crawling speed across rough sandpaper was the most striking, showing a clear inversely proportional relationship between the size of abrasive particle and speed. We suggest that this may be the result of substrate attributes interfering with mucus adhesion or mucus production, subsequently affecting locomotion, although gait choice or the frequency and length of each pedal wave may also play a role.

KW - Gastropod

KW - Propulsion

KW - Adhesive locomotion

KW - Substrate

KW - Size

U2 - 10.1111/jzo.12865

DO - 10.1111/jzo.12865

M3 - Article

VL - Early View

JO - Journal of Zoology

JF - Journal of Zoology

SN - 0952-8369

ER -

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