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Humans are not alone in computing how others see the world

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Humans are not alone in computing how others see the world. / Whiten, Andrew.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 86, No. 2, 01.08.2013, p. 213-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Whiten, A 2013, 'Humans are not alone in computing how others see the world' Animal Behaviour, vol 86, no. 2, pp. 213-221. DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.04.021

APA

Whiten, A. (2013). Humans are not alone in computing how others see the world. Animal Behaviour, 86(2), 213-221. DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.04.021

Vancouver

Whiten A. Humans are not alone in computing how others see the world. Animal Behaviour. 2013 Aug 1;86(2):213-221. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.04.021

Author

Whiten, Andrew / Humans are not alone in computing how others see the world.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 86, No. 2, 01.08.2013, p. 213-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{5de0b491498144b8bb91c74b317a0141,
title = "Humans are not alone in computing how others see the world",
abstract = "It is 35 years since Premack & Woodruff famously asked, 'Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?' (1978, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1, 515-526). The first wave of experiments designed to tackle this provocative question in the context of cooperative transactions with humans offered largely negative answers. It was not until a landmark Animal Behaviour paper by Hare etal. (2000, Animal Behaviour, 59, 771-786) that a different approach based around foraging competition between conspecifics delivered an affirmative (if limited) verdict that, at least, 'Chimpanzees know what conspecifics do and do not see'. This influential paper laid the foundations for a much more productive decade of studies that provided evidence for apes' recognition in others of states corresponding to knowing, intending and inferring. It further stimulated related studies in other mammalian and avian species too. Here I set the Hare etal. paper in its historical, scientific context, provide an overview of the variety of studies that have followed in its wake and address some core questions about the scientific tractability of identifying phenomena in nonverbal creatures that may be akin to human 'theory of mind'.",
keywords = "mindreading , theory of mind, chimpanzees",
author = "Andrew Whiten",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.04.021",
volume = "86",
pages = "213--221",
journal = "Animal Behaviour",
issn = "0003-3472",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Humans are not alone in computing how others see the world

AU - Whiten,Andrew

PY - 2013/8/1

Y1 - 2013/8/1

N2 - It is 35 years since Premack & Woodruff famously asked, 'Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?' (1978, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1, 515-526). The first wave of experiments designed to tackle this provocative question in the context of cooperative transactions with humans offered largely negative answers. It was not until a landmark Animal Behaviour paper by Hare etal. (2000, Animal Behaviour, 59, 771-786) that a different approach based around foraging competition between conspecifics delivered an affirmative (if limited) verdict that, at least, 'Chimpanzees know what conspecifics do and do not see'. This influential paper laid the foundations for a much more productive decade of studies that provided evidence for apes' recognition in others of states corresponding to knowing, intending and inferring. It further stimulated related studies in other mammalian and avian species too. Here I set the Hare etal. paper in its historical, scientific context, provide an overview of the variety of studies that have followed in its wake and address some core questions about the scientific tractability of identifying phenomena in nonverbal creatures that may be akin to human 'theory of mind'.

AB - It is 35 years since Premack & Woodruff famously asked, 'Does the chimpanzee have a theory of mind?' (1978, Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 1, 515-526). The first wave of experiments designed to tackle this provocative question in the context of cooperative transactions with humans offered largely negative answers. It was not until a landmark Animal Behaviour paper by Hare etal. (2000, Animal Behaviour, 59, 771-786) that a different approach based around foraging competition between conspecifics delivered an affirmative (if limited) verdict that, at least, 'Chimpanzees know what conspecifics do and do not see'. This influential paper laid the foundations for a much more productive decade of studies that provided evidence for apes' recognition in others of states corresponding to knowing, intending and inferring. It further stimulated related studies in other mammalian and avian species too. Here I set the Hare etal. paper in its historical, scientific context, provide an overview of the variety of studies that have followed in its wake and address some core questions about the scientific tractability of identifying phenomena in nonverbal creatures that may be akin to human 'theory of mind'.

KW - mindreading

KW - theory of mind

KW - chimpanzees

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-84880751035&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.04.021

DO - 10.1016/j.anbehav.2013.04.021

M3 - Article

VL - 86

SP - 213

EP - 221

JO - Animal Behaviour

T2 - Animal Behaviour

JF - Animal Behaviour

SN - 0003-3472

IS - 2

ER -

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