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Hybrid swarms: catalysts for multiple evolutionary events in Senecio in the British Isles

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Hybrid swarms : catalysts for multiple evolutionary events in Senecio in the British Isles. / Lowe, A.J.; Abbott, R.J.

In: Plant Ecology & Diversity, Vol. 8, No. 4, 07.06.2015, p. 449-463.

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Harvard

Lowe, AJ & Abbott, RJ 2015, 'Hybrid swarms: catalysts for multiple evolutionary events in Senecio in the British Isles' Plant Ecology & Diversity, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 449-463. https://doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2015.1028113

APA

Lowe, A. J., & Abbott, R. J. (2015). Hybrid swarms: catalysts for multiple evolutionary events in Senecio in the British Isles. Plant Ecology & Diversity, 8(4), 449-463. https://doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2015.1028113

Vancouver

Lowe AJ, Abbott RJ. Hybrid swarms: catalysts for multiple evolutionary events in Senecio in the British Isles. Plant Ecology & Diversity. 2015 Jun 7;8(4):449-463. https://doi.org/10.1080/17550874.2015.1028113

Author

Lowe, A.J. ; Abbott, R.J. / Hybrid swarms : catalysts for multiple evolutionary events in Senecio in the British Isles. In: Plant Ecology & Diversity. 2015 ; Vol. 8, No. 4. pp. 449-463.

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@article{1837a38554584bf69e380666ee3b3351,
title = "Hybrid swarms: catalysts for multiple evolutionary events in Senecio in the British Isles",
abstract = "Background: Introgressive hybridisation is an evolutionary catalyst producing novel variants able to explore new ecological niches and evolve as new hybrid taxa. However, the role of ‘hybrid swarms’ – highly variable populations produced following interspecific hybridisation – in generating this evolutionary novelty has been poorly studied. Aims: We examine the alternative origins of tetraploid hybrid derivatives of Senecio vulgaris and S. squalidus, via local polytopic formation or long-distance dispersal from a single perennial hybrid swarm around Cork, Ireland. Methods: Morphometric, isozyme and chloroplast DNA analysis. Results: The Cork hybrid swarm and UK hybrid swarms exhibited a broad range of morphological variation and contained individuals similar to the stable tetraploid hybrid derivatives; S. eboracensis and S. vulgaris var. hibernicus. Chloroplast DNA analysis shows that S. eboracensis did not evolve from the Cork hybrid swarm. However, UK S. vulgaris var. hibernicus populations exhibit a broad range of variation for both chloroplast and isozyme markers, but were not distinguishable from Cork material. Conclusions: Our study confirms that S. eboracensis did not evolve from the Cork hybrid swarm, and while our analyses could not demonstrate this conclusively for S. vulgaris var. hibernicus the ease with which hybrid swarms have been generated in the past makes a polytopic origin for S. vulgaris var. hibernicus the most likely scenario.",
keywords = "Evolutionary genetics, Hybridisation, Hybrid taxa, Introgression, Polytopic origin, Senecio",
author = "A.J. Lowe and R.J. Abbott",
year = "2015",
month = "6",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1080/17550874.2015.1028113",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "449--463",
journal = "Plant Ecology & Diversity",
issn = "1755-0874",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hybrid swarms

T2 - Plant Ecology & Diversity

AU - Lowe, A.J.

AU - Abbott, R.J.

PY - 2015/6/7

Y1 - 2015/6/7

N2 - Background: Introgressive hybridisation is an evolutionary catalyst producing novel variants able to explore new ecological niches and evolve as new hybrid taxa. However, the role of ‘hybrid swarms’ – highly variable populations produced following interspecific hybridisation – in generating this evolutionary novelty has been poorly studied. Aims: We examine the alternative origins of tetraploid hybrid derivatives of Senecio vulgaris and S. squalidus, via local polytopic formation or long-distance dispersal from a single perennial hybrid swarm around Cork, Ireland. Methods: Morphometric, isozyme and chloroplast DNA analysis. Results: The Cork hybrid swarm and UK hybrid swarms exhibited a broad range of morphological variation and contained individuals similar to the stable tetraploid hybrid derivatives; S. eboracensis and S. vulgaris var. hibernicus. Chloroplast DNA analysis shows that S. eboracensis did not evolve from the Cork hybrid swarm. However, UK S. vulgaris var. hibernicus populations exhibit a broad range of variation for both chloroplast and isozyme markers, but were not distinguishable from Cork material. Conclusions: Our study confirms that S. eboracensis did not evolve from the Cork hybrid swarm, and while our analyses could not demonstrate this conclusively for S. vulgaris var. hibernicus the ease with which hybrid swarms have been generated in the past makes a polytopic origin for S. vulgaris var. hibernicus the most likely scenario.

AB - Background: Introgressive hybridisation is an evolutionary catalyst producing novel variants able to explore new ecological niches and evolve as new hybrid taxa. However, the role of ‘hybrid swarms’ – highly variable populations produced following interspecific hybridisation – in generating this evolutionary novelty has been poorly studied. Aims: We examine the alternative origins of tetraploid hybrid derivatives of Senecio vulgaris and S. squalidus, via local polytopic formation or long-distance dispersal from a single perennial hybrid swarm around Cork, Ireland. Methods: Morphometric, isozyme and chloroplast DNA analysis. Results: The Cork hybrid swarm and UK hybrid swarms exhibited a broad range of morphological variation and contained individuals similar to the stable tetraploid hybrid derivatives; S. eboracensis and S. vulgaris var. hibernicus. Chloroplast DNA analysis shows that S. eboracensis did not evolve from the Cork hybrid swarm. However, UK S. vulgaris var. hibernicus populations exhibit a broad range of variation for both chloroplast and isozyme markers, but were not distinguishable from Cork material. Conclusions: Our study confirms that S. eboracensis did not evolve from the Cork hybrid swarm, and while our analyses could not demonstrate this conclusively for S. vulgaris var. hibernicus the ease with which hybrid swarms have been generated in the past makes a polytopic origin for S. vulgaris var. hibernicus the most likely scenario.

KW - Evolutionary genetics

KW - Hybridisation

KW - Hybrid taxa

KW - Introgression

KW - Polytopic origin

KW - Senecio

U2 - 10.1080/17550874.2015.1028113

DO - 10.1080/17550874.2015.1028113

M3 - Article

VL - 8

SP - 449

EP - 463

JO - Plant Ecology & Diversity

JF - Plant Ecology & Diversity

SN - 1755-0874

IS - 4

ER -

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ID: 219353679