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Identification of amblyogenic risk factors with the Brückner reflex test using the low-cost Arclight direct ophthalmoscope

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Identification of amblyogenic risk factors with the Brückner reflex test using the low-cost Arclight direct ophthalmoscope. / Tuteja, Sahib Y.; Blaikie, Andrew; Kekunnaya, Ramesh.

In: Eye, Vol. First Online, 07.01.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Tuteja, SY, Blaikie, A & Kekunnaya, R 2021, 'Identification of amblyogenic risk factors with the Brückner reflex test using the low-cost Arclight direct ophthalmoscope', Eye, vol. First Online. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41433-020-01341-9

APA

Tuteja, S. Y., Blaikie, A., & Kekunnaya, R. (2021). Identification of amblyogenic risk factors with the Brückner reflex test using the low-cost Arclight direct ophthalmoscope. Eye, First Online. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41433-020-01341-9

Vancouver

Tuteja SY, Blaikie A, Kekunnaya R. Identification of amblyogenic risk factors with the Brückner reflex test using the low-cost Arclight direct ophthalmoscope. Eye. 2021 Jan 7;First Online. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41433-020-01341-9

Author

Tuteja, Sahib Y. ; Blaikie, Andrew ; Kekunnaya, Ramesh. / Identification of amblyogenic risk factors with the Brückner reflex test using the low-cost Arclight direct ophthalmoscope. In: Eye. 2021 ; Vol. First Online.

Bibtex - Download

@article{16c8eb320fc94a529c73c18db57fdfb1,
title = "Identification of amblyogenic risk factors with the Br{\"u}ckner reflex test using the low-cost Arclight direct ophthalmoscope",
abstract = "Background/objectivesThe Arclight is a novel, low-cost, solar-powered direct ophthalmoscope developed for low resource settings as an alternative to more expensive, conventional devices. The Br{\"u}ckner reflex test (BRT) is a quick and effective means to screen for eye disease and amblyogenic risk factors. This test is however rarely performed in low resource settings due to the lack of access to ophthalmoscopes and trained health care workers. Our aim was to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the BRT when performed by a non-expert using an Arclight and compare to an expert as well as the results of a full clinic workup.Subjects/methodsIn this prospective, blinded study, 64 patients referred to a paediatric ophthalmology clinic had the BRT performed by a {\textquoteleft}non-expert{\textquoteright} observer (medical student) then an {\textquoteleft}expert{\textquoteright} observer (consultant ophthalmologist). These results were then compared against the {\textquoteleft}gold standard{\textquoteright} outcomes of a full clinical workup.ResultsBRT screening by the expert observer led to a sensitivity of 75.0% [95% CI: 57.9–86.8%] and a specificity of 90.6% [95% CI: 75.8–96.8%] in picking up media opacity, strabismus, refractive error or a combination of the above. For the non-expert, the sensitivity and specificity were 71.9% [95% CI: 54.6–84.4%] and 84.4% [95% CI: 68.3–93.1%], respectively.ConclusionsThe Arclight can be effectively used to perform the BRT and identify eye disease and common amblyogenic risk factors. Even when performed by a non-expert the results are highly specific and moderately sensitive. This study consequently offers support for the use of this low-cost ophthalmoscope in the expansion of eye screening by health care workers in low resource settings.",
author = "Tuteja, {Sahib Y.} and Andrew Blaikie and Ramesh Kekunnaya",
year = "2021",
month = jan,
day = "7",
doi = "10.1038/s41433-020-01341-9",
language = "English",
volume = "First Online",
journal = "Eye",
issn = "0950-222X",
publisher = "Nature publishing group",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Identification of amblyogenic risk factors with the Brückner reflex test using the low-cost Arclight direct ophthalmoscope

AU - Tuteja, Sahib Y.

AU - Blaikie, Andrew

AU - Kekunnaya, Ramesh

PY - 2021/1/7

Y1 - 2021/1/7

N2 - Background/objectivesThe Arclight is a novel, low-cost, solar-powered direct ophthalmoscope developed for low resource settings as an alternative to more expensive, conventional devices. The Brückner reflex test (BRT) is a quick and effective means to screen for eye disease and amblyogenic risk factors. This test is however rarely performed in low resource settings due to the lack of access to ophthalmoscopes and trained health care workers. Our aim was to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the BRT when performed by a non-expert using an Arclight and compare to an expert as well as the results of a full clinic workup.Subjects/methodsIn this prospective, blinded study, 64 patients referred to a paediatric ophthalmology clinic had the BRT performed by a ‘non-expert’ observer (medical student) then an ‘expert’ observer (consultant ophthalmologist). These results were then compared against the ‘gold standard’ outcomes of a full clinical workup.ResultsBRT screening by the expert observer led to a sensitivity of 75.0% [95% CI: 57.9–86.8%] and a specificity of 90.6% [95% CI: 75.8–96.8%] in picking up media opacity, strabismus, refractive error or a combination of the above. For the non-expert, the sensitivity and specificity were 71.9% [95% CI: 54.6–84.4%] and 84.4% [95% CI: 68.3–93.1%], respectively.ConclusionsThe Arclight can be effectively used to perform the BRT and identify eye disease and common amblyogenic risk factors. Even when performed by a non-expert the results are highly specific and moderately sensitive. This study consequently offers support for the use of this low-cost ophthalmoscope in the expansion of eye screening by health care workers in low resource settings.

AB - Background/objectivesThe Arclight is a novel, low-cost, solar-powered direct ophthalmoscope developed for low resource settings as an alternative to more expensive, conventional devices. The Brückner reflex test (BRT) is a quick and effective means to screen for eye disease and amblyogenic risk factors. This test is however rarely performed in low resource settings due to the lack of access to ophthalmoscopes and trained health care workers. Our aim was to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the BRT when performed by a non-expert using an Arclight and compare to an expert as well as the results of a full clinic workup.Subjects/methodsIn this prospective, blinded study, 64 patients referred to a paediatric ophthalmology clinic had the BRT performed by a ‘non-expert’ observer (medical student) then an ‘expert’ observer (consultant ophthalmologist). These results were then compared against the ‘gold standard’ outcomes of a full clinical workup.ResultsBRT screening by the expert observer led to a sensitivity of 75.0% [95% CI: 57.9–86.8%] and a specificity of 90.6% [95% CI: 75.8–96.8%] in picking up media opacity, strabismus, refractive error or a combination of the above. For the non-expert, the sensitivity and specificity were 71.9% [95% CI: 54.6–84.4%] and 84.4% [95% CI: 68.3–93.1%], respectively.ConclusionsThe Arclight can be effectively used to perform the BRT and identify eye disease and common amblyogenic risk factors. Even when performed by a non-expert the results are highly specific and moderately sensitive. This study consequently offers support for the use of this low-cost ophthalmoscope in the expansion of eye screening by health care workers in low resource settings.

U2 - 10.1038/s41433-020-01341-9

DO - 10.1038/s41433-020-01341-9

M3 - Article

VL - First Online

JO - Eye

JF - Eye

SN - 0950-222X

ER -

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