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Imitative learning of artificial fruit processing in children (homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (pan troglodytes)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Imitative learning of artificial fruit processing in children (homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (pan troglodytes). / Whiten, Andrew; Custance, D; Gomez, Juan-Carlos; Teixidor, P; Bard, KA.

In: Journal of Comparative Psychology, Vol. 110, 03.1996, p. 3-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Whiten, A, Custance, D, Gomez, J-C, Teixidor, P & Bard, KA 1996, 'Imitative learning of artificial fruit processing in children (homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (pan troglodytes)', Journal of Comparative Psychology, vol. 110, pp. 3-14.

APA

Whiten, A., Custance, D., Gomez, J-C., Teixidor, P., & Bard, KA. (1996). Imitative learning of artificial fruit processing in children (homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (pan troglodytes). Journal of Comparative Psychology, 110, 3-14.

Vancouver

Whiten A, Custance D, Gomez J-C, Teixidor P, Bard KA. Imitative learning of artificial fruit processing in children (homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (pan troglodytes). Journal of Comparative Psychology. 1996 Mar;110:3-14.

Author

Whiten, Andrew ; Custance, D ; Gomez, Juan-Carlos ; Teixidor, P ; Bard, KA. / Imitative learning of artificial fruit processing in children (homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (pan troglodytes). In: Journal of Comparative Psychology. 1996 ; Vol. 110. pp. 3-14.

Bibtex - Download

@article{93ac77567cd14e0c8bb6fd1d4c0c74ba,
title = "Imitative learning of artificial fruit processing in children (homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (pan troglodytes)",
abstract = "Observational learning in chimpanzees and young children was investigated using an artificial fruit designed as an analog of natural foraging problems faced by primates. Each of 3 principal components could be removed in 2 alternative ways, demonstration of only one of which was watched by each subject. This permitted subsequent imitation by subjects to be distinguished from stimulus enhancement. Children aged 2-4 years evidenced imitation for 2 components, but also achieved demonstrated outcomes through their own techniques. Chimpanzees relied even more on their own techniques, but they did imitate elements of 1 component of the task. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence of chimpanzee imitation in a functional task designed to simulate foraging behavior hypothesized to be transmitted culturally in the wild.",
keywords = "EVOLUTION, TRANSMISSION, RATS",
author = "Andrew Whiten and D Custance and Juan-Carlos Gomez and P Teixidor and KA Bard",
note = "DC and PT PhD students",
year = "1996",
month = mar,
language = "English",
volume = "110",
pages = "3--14",
journal = "Journal of Comparative Psychology",
issn = "0735-7036",
publisher = "AMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Imitative learning of artificial fruit processing in children (homo sapiens) and chimpanzees (pan troglodytes)

AU - Whiten, Andrew

AU - Custance, D

AU - Gomez, Juan-Carlos

AU - Teixidor, P

AU - Bard, KA

N1 - DC and PT PhD students

PY - 1996/3

Y1 - 1996/3

N2 - Observational learning in chimpanzees and young children was investigated using an artificial fruit designed as an analog of natural foraging problems faced by primates. Each of 3 principal components could be removed in 2 alternative ways, demonstration of only one of which was watched by each subject. This permitted subsequent imitation by subjects to be distinguished from stimulus enhancement. Children aged 2-4 years evidenced imitation for 2 components, but also achieved demonstrated outcomes through their own techniques. Chimpanzees relied even more on their own techniques, but they did imitate elements of 1 component of the task. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence of chimpanzee imitation in a functional task designed to simulate foraging behavior hypothesized to be transmitted culturally in the wild.

AB - Observational learning in chimpanzees and young children was investigated using an artificial fruit designed as an analog of natural foraging problems faced by primates. Each of 3 principal components could be removed in 2 alternative ways, demonstration of only one of which was watched by each subject. This permitted subsequent imitation by subjects to be distinguished from stimulus enhancement. Children aged 2-4 years evidenced imitation for 2 components, but also achieved demonstrated outcomes through their own techniques. Chimpanzees relied even more on their own techniques, but they did imitate elements of 1 component of the task. To our knowledge, this is the first experimental evidence of chimpanzee imitation in a functional task designed to simulate foraging behavior hypothesized to be transmitted culturally in the wild.

KW - EVOLUTION

KW - TRANSMISSION

KW - RATS

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030092871&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 110

SP - 3

EP - 14

JO - Journal of Comparative Psychology

JF - Journal of Comparative Psychology

SN - 0735-7036

ER -

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