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Impacts of anthropogenic noise on marine life: publication patterns, new discoveries, and future directions in research and management

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Impacts of anthropogenic noise on marine life : publication patterns, new discoveries, and future directions in research and management. / Williams, Robert; Wright, Andrew J; Ashe, Erin; Blight, LK; Bruintjes, R; Canessa, R; Clark, CW; Cullis-Suzuki, S; Dakin, DT; Erbe, C; Hammond, Philip Steven; Merchant, MD; O'Hara, PD; Purser, J; Radford, AN; Simpson, SD; Thomas, Len; Wale, MA.

In: Ocean and Coastal Management, Vol. 115, 10.2015, p. 17-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Williams, R, Wright, AJ, Ashe, E, Blight, LK, Bruintjes, R, Canessa, R, Clark, CW, Cullis-Suzuki, S, Dakin, DT, Erbe, C, Hammond, PS, Merchant, MD, O'Hara, PD, Purser, J, Radford, AN, Simpson, SD, Thomas, L & Wale, MA 2015, 'Impacts of anthropogenic noise on marine life: publication patterns, new discoveries, and future directions in research and management' Ocean and Coastal Management, vol. 115, pp. 17-24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.05.021

APA

Williams, R., Wright, A. J., Ashe, E., Blight, LK., Bruintjes, R., Canessa, R., ... Wale, MA. (2015). Impacts of anthropogenic noise on marine life: publication patterns, new discoveries, and future directions in research and management. Ocean and Coastal Management, 115, 17-24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.05.021

Vancouver

Williams R, Wright AJ, Ashe E, Blight LK, Bruintjes R, Canessa R et al. Impacts of anthropogenic noise on marine life: publication patterns, new discoveries, and future directions in research and management. Ocean and Coastal Management. 2015 Oct;115:17-24. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.05.021

Author

Williams, Robert ; Wright, Andrew J ; Ashe, Erin ; Blight, LK ; Bruintjes, R ; Canessa, R ; Clark, CW ; Cullis-Suzuki, S ; Dakin, DT ; Erbe, C ; Hammond, Philip Steven ; Merchant, MD ; O'Hara, PD ; Purser, J ; Radford, AN ; Simpson, SD ; Thomas, Len ; Wale, MA. / Impacts of anthropogenic noise on marine life : publication patterns, new discoveries, and future directions in research and management. In: Ocean and Coastal Management. 2015 ; Vol. 115. pp. 17-24.

Bibtex - Download

@article{d0f89421f3214f90921ce4c6e72ec284,
title = "Impacts of anthropogenic noise on marine life: publication patterns, new discoveries, and future directions in research and management",
abstract = "Anthropogenic underwater noise is now recognized as a world-wide problem, and recent studies have shown a broad range of negative effects in a variety of taxa. Underwater noise from shipping is increasingly recognized as a significant and pervasive pollutant with the potential to impact marine ecosystems on a global scale. We reviewed six regional case studies as examples of recent research and management activities relating to ocean noise in a variety of taxonomic groups, locations, and approaches. However, as no six projects could ever cover all taxa, sites and noise sources, a brief bibliometric analysis places these case studies into the broader historical and topical context of the peer-reviewed ocean noise literature as a whole. The case studies highlighted emerging knowledge of impacts, including the ways that non-injurious effects can still accumulate at the population level, and detailed approaches to guide ocean noise management. They build a compelling case that a number of anthropogenic noise types can affect a variety of marine taxa. Meanwhile, the bibliometric analyses revealed an increasing diversity of ocean noise topics covered and journal outlets since the 1940s. This could be seen in terms of both the expansion of the literature from more physical interests to ecological impacts of noise, management and policy, and consideration of a widening range of taxa. However, if our scientific knowledge base is ever to get ahead of the curve of rapid industrialization of the ocean, we are going to have to identify na{\"i}ve populations and relatively pristine seas, and construct mechanisticmodels, so that we can predict impacts before they occur, and guide effective mitigation for the most vulnerable populations.",
keywords = "Anthropogenic, Conservation, Ecology, Marine, Ocean noise, Policy, Shipping",
author = "Robert Williams and Wright, {Andrew J} and Erin Ashe and LK Blight and R Bruintjes and R Canessa and CW Clark and S Cullis-Suzuki and DT Dakin and C Erbe and Hammond, {Philip Steven} and MD Merchant and PD O'Hara and J Purser and AN Radford and SD Simpson and Len Thomas and MA Wale",
note = "Funding for R. Bruintjes, J. Purser, A. N. Radford, S. D, Simpson and M. A. Wale was provided by the UK Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). N.D. Merchant received travel funding from Ocean Networks Canada. RW was supported by a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme (Project CONCEAL, FP7, PIIF-GA-2009-253407), and received travel funding to attend IMCC3 from the Society for Conservation Biology (SCB) Marine Section and the International Whaling Commission’s Climate Change steering group (with thanks to Mark Simmonds). A.J. Wright also received travel funding to attend IMCC3 from the SCB Marine Section. Date of Acceptance: 28/05/2015",
year = "2015",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.05.021",
language = "English",
volume = "115",
pages = "17--24",
journal = "Ocean and Coastal Management",
issn = "0964-5691",
publisher = "ELSEVIER SCI LTD",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Impacts of anthropogenic noise on marine life

T2 - Ocean and Coastal Management

AU - Williams, Robert

AU - Wright, Andrew J

AU - Ashe, Erin

AU - Blight, LK

AU - Bruintjes, R

AU - Canessa, R

AU - Clark, CW

AU - Cullis-Suzuki, S

AU - Dakin, DT

AU - Erbe, C

AU - Hammond, Philip Steven

AU - Merchant, MD

AU - O'Hara, PD

AU - Purser, J

AU - Radford, AN

AU - Simpson, SD

AU - Thomas, Len

AU - Wale, MA

N1 - Funding for R. Bruintjes, J. Purser, A. N. Radford, S. D, Simpson and M. A. Wale was provided by the UK Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (Defra). N.D. Merchant received travel funding from Ocean Networks Canada. RW was supported by a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Programme (Project CONCEAL, FP7, PIIF-GA-2009-253407), and received travel funding to attend IMCC3 from the Society for Conservation Biology (SCB) Marine Section and the International Whaling Commission’s Climate Change steering group (with thanks to Mark Simmonds). A.J. Wright also received travel funding to attend IMCC3 from the SCB Marine Section. Date of Acceptance: 28/05/2015

PY - 2015/10

Y1 - 2015/10

N2 - Anthropogenic underwater noise is now recognized as a world-wide problem, and recent studies have shown a broad range of negative effects in a variety of taxa. Underwater noise from shipping is increasingly recognized as a significant and pervasive pollutant with the potential to impact marine ecosystems on a global scale. We reviewed six regional case studies as examples of recent research and management activities relating to ocean noise in a variety of taxonomic groups, locations, and approaches. However, as no six projects could ever cover all taxa, sites and noise sources, a brief bibliometric analysis places these case studies into the broader historical and topical context of the peer-reviewed ocean noise literature as a whole. The case studies highlighted emerging knowledge of impacts, including the ways that non-injurious effects can still accumulate at the population level, and detailed approaches to guide ocean noise management. They build a compelling case that a number of anthropogenic noise types can affect a variety of marine taxa. Meanwhile, the bibliometric analyses revealed an increasing diversity of ocean noise topics covered and journal outlets since the 1940s. This could be seen in terms of both the expansion of the literature from more physical interests to ecological impacts of noise, management and policy, and consideration of a widening range of taxa. However, if our scientific knowledge base is ever to get ahead of the curve of rapid industrialization of the ocean, we are going to have to identify naïve populations and relatively pristine seas, and construct mechanisticmodels, so that we can predict impacts before they occur, and guide effective mitigation for the most vulnerable populations.

AB - Anthropogenic underwater noise is now recognized as a world-wide problem, and recent studies have shown a broad range of negative effects in a variety of taxa. Underwater noise from shipping is increasingly recognized as a significant and pervasive pollutant with the potential to impact marine ecosystems on a global scale. We reviewed six regional case studies as examples of recent research and management activities relating to ocean noise in a variety of taxonomic groups, locations, and approaches. However, as no six projects could ever cover all taxa, sites and noise sources, a brief bibliometric analysis places these case studies into the broader historical and topical context of the peer-reviewed ocean noise literature as a whole. The case studies highlighted emerging knowledge of impacts, including the ways that non-injurious effects can still accumulate at the population level, and detailed approaches to guide ocean noise management. They build a compelling case that a number of anthropogenic noise types can affect a variety of marine taxa. Meanwhile, the bibliometric analyses revealed an increasing diversity of ocean noise topics covered and journal outlets since the 1940s. This could be seen in terms of both the expansion of the literature from more physical interests to ecological impacts of noise, management and policy, and consideration of a widening range of taxa. However, if our scientific knowledge base is ever to get ahead of the curve of rapid industrialization of the ocean, we are going to have to identify naïve populations and relatively pristine seas, and construct mechanisticmodels, so that we can predict impacts before they occur, and guide effective mitigation for the most vulnerable populations.

KW - Anthropogenic

KW - Conservation

KW - Ecology

KW - Marine

KW - Ocean noise

KW - Policy

KW - Shipping

UR - http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096456911500160X#appd001

U2 - 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.05.021

DO - 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.05.021

M3 - Article

VL - 115

SP - 17

EP - 24

JO - Ocean and Coastal Management

JF - Ocean and Coastal Management

SN - 0964-5691

ER -

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ID: 194382697