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Individual recognition in wild bottlenose dolphins: a field test using playback experiments

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DOI

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Individual recognition in wild bottlenose dolphins : a field test using playback experiments. / Sayigh, L S ; Tyack, Peter Lloyd; Wells, R S ; Solow, A R ; Scott, M D ; Irvine, A B .

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 57, No. 1, 01.1999, p. 41-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Sayigh, LS, Tyack, PL, Wells, RS, Solow, AR, Scott, MD & Irvine, AB 1999, 'Individual recognition in wild bottlenose dolphins: a field test using playback experiments' Animal Behaviour, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 41-50. https://doi.org/10.1006/anbe.1998.0961

APA

Sayigh, L. S., Tyack, P. L., Wells, R. S., Solow, A. R., Scott, M. D., & Irvine, A. B. (1999). Individual recognition in wild bottlenose dolphins: a field test using playback experiments. Animal Behaviour, 57(1), 41-50. https://doi.org/10.1006/anbe.1998.0961

Vancouver

Sayigh LS, Tyack PL, Wells RS, Solow AR, Scott MD, Irvine AB. Individual recognition in wild bottlenose dolphins: a field test using playback experiments. Animal Behaviour. 1999 Jan;57(1):41-50. https://doi.org/10.1006/anbe.1998.0961

Author

Sayigh, L S ; Tyack, Peter Lloyd ; Wells, R S ; Solow, A R ; Scott, M D ; Irvine, A B . / Individual recognition in wild bottlenose dolphins : a field test using playback experiments. In: Animal Behaviour. 1999 ; Vol. 57, No. 1. pp. 41-50.

Bibtex - Download

@article{4eab3a74848e412fb0acebf47118f445,
title = "Individual recognition in wild bottlenose dolphins: a field test using playback experiments",
abstract = "We conducted playback experiments with wild bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, to determine whether there is sufficient information in their individually distinctive signature whistles for individual recognition. We conducted experiments with members of a resident community of dolphins in waters near Sarasota, Florida, during temporary capture-release projects. We used a paired playback design, wherein the same two whistle sequences were predicted to evoke opposite responses from two different target animals. This design controlled for any unknown cues that may have been present in the playback stimuli. We predicted that mothers would respond more strongly to the whistles of their own independent offspring than to the whistles of a familiar, similar-aged nonoffspring. Similarly, we predicted that independent offspring would respond more strongly to the whistles of their own mother than to the whistles of a familiar, similar-aged female. Target animals were significantly (P<0.02) more likely to respond to the predicted stimuli, with responses measured by the number of head turns towards the playback speaker. In bottlenose dolphin societies, stable, individual-specific relationships are intermixed with fluid patterns of association between individuals. In primate species that live in similar 'fission-fusion' type societies, individual recognition is commonplace. Thus, when taken in the context of what is known about the social structure and behaviour of bottlenose dolphins, these playback experiments suggest that signature whistles are used for individual recognition. (C) 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.",
author = "Sayigh, {L S} and Tyack, {Peter Lloyd} and Wells, {R S} and Solow, {A R} and Scott, {M D} and Irvine, {A B}",
year = "1999",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1006/anbe.1998.0961",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
pages = "41--50",
journal = "Animal Behaviour",
issn = "0003-3472",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Individual recognition in wild bottlenose dolphins

T2 - Animal Behaviour

AU - Sayigh, L S

AU - Tyack, Peter Lloyd

AU - Wells, R S

AU - Solow, A R

AU - Scott, M D

AU - Irvine, A B

PY - 1999/1

Y1 - 1999/1

N2 - We conducted playback experiments with wild bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, to determine whether there is sufficient information in their individually distinctive signature whistles for individual recognition. We conducted experiments with members of a resident community of dolphins in waters near Sarasota, Florida, during temporary capture-release projects. We used a paired playback design, wherein the same two whistle sequences were predicted to evoke opposite responses from two different target animals. This design controlled for any unknown cues that may have been present in the playback stimuli. We predicted that mothers would respond more strongly to the whistles of their own independent offspring than to the whistles of a familiar, similar-aged nonoffspring. Similarly, we predicted that independent offspring would respond more strongly to the whistles of their own mother than to the whistles of a familiar, similar-aged female. Target animals were significantly (P<0.02) more likely to respond to the predicted stimuli, with responses measured by the number of head turns towards the playback speaker. In bottlenose dolphin societies, stable, individual-specific relationships are intermixed with fluid patterns of association between individuals. In primate species that live in similar 'fission-fusion' type societies, individual recognition is commonplace. Thus, when taken in the context of what is known about the social structure and behaviour of bottlenose dolphins, these playback experiments suggest that signature whistles are used for individual recognition. (C) 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

AB - We conducted playback experiments with wild bottlenose dolphins, Tursiops truncatus, to determine whether there is sufficient information in their individually distinctive signature whistles for individual recognition. We conducted experiments with members of a resident community of dolphins in waters near Sarasota, Florida, during temporary capture-release projects. We used a paired playback design, wherein the same two whistle sequences were predicted to evoke opposite responses from two different target animals. This design controlled for any unknown cues that may have been present in the playback stimuli. We predicted that mothers would respond more strongly to the whistles of their own independent offspring than to the whistles of a familiar, similar-aged nonoffspring. Similarly, we predicted that independent offspring would respond more strongly to the whistles of their own mother than to the whistles of a familiar, similar-aged female. Target animals were significantly (P<0.02) more likely to respond to the predicted stimuli, with responses measured by the number of head turns towards the playback speaker. In bottlenose dolphin societies, stable, individual-specific relationships are intermixed with fluid patterns of association between individuals. In primate species that live in similar 'fission-fusion' type societies, individual recognition is commonplace. Thus, when taken in the context of what is known about the social structure and behaviour of bottlenose dolphins, these playback experiments suggest that signature whistles are used for individual recognition. (C) 1999 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

U2 - 10.1006/anbe.1998.0961

DO - 10.1006/anbe.1998.0961

M3 - Article

VL - 57

SP - 41

EP - 50

JO - Animal Behaviour

JF - Animal Behaviour

SN - 0003-3472

IS - 1

ER -

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ID: 21300445