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Infants determine others' focus of attention by pragmatics and exclusion

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Infants determine others' focus of attention by pragmatics and exclusion. / Moll, Henrike; Koring, Cornelia; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael.

In: Journal of Cognition and Development, Vol. 7, No. 3, 2006, p. 411-430.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Moll, H, Koring, C, Carpenter, M & Tomasello, M 2006, 'Infants determine others' focus of attention by pragmatics and exclusion', Journal of Cognition and Development, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 411-430. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327647jcd0703_9

APA

Moll, H., Koring, C., Carpenter, M., & Tomasello, M. (2006). Infants determine others' focus of attention by pragmatics and exclusion. Journal of Cognition and Development, 7(3), 411-430. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327647jcd0703_9

Vancouver

Moll H, Koring C, Carpenter M, Tomasello M. Infants determine others' focus of attention by pragmatics and exclusion. Journal of Cognition and Development. 2006;7(3):411-430. https://doi.org/10.1207/s15327647jcd0703_9

Author

Moll, Henrike ; Koring, Cornelia ; Carpenter, Malinda ; Tomasello, Michael. / Infants determine others' focus of attention by pragmatics and exclusion. In: Journal of Cognition and Development. 2006 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 411-430.

Bibtex - Download

@article{990850ef3cec4ac3b4658935a1833c01,
title = "Infants determine others' focus of attention by pragmatics and exclusion",
abstract = "In the studies presented here, infants' understanding of others' attention was assessed when gaze direction cues were not diagnostic. Fourteen-, 18- and 24-month-olds witnessed an adult look to the side of an object and express excitement. In 1 experimental condition this object was new for the adult because she was not present while the child and someone else played with it earlier. Children responded to this as if they assumed that the adult was excited about this new object as a whole. In the other condition the object was one with which the infant and this adult had just previously played for a minute. In this case children appeared to assume that the adult could not be excited about this object in itself. They responded either by attending to a specific part of the object or, more frequently, by looking around the room for another object. These results suggest that 1-year-olds can determine what others are attending to based on a pragmatic assessment of what is new and what is old for them combined with a form of reasoning by exclusion.",
keywords = "MUTUAL EXCLUSIVITY, 18-MONTH-OLDS, OBJECTS, WORDS, GAZE, CUES, EYES",
author = "Henrike Moll and Cornelia Koring and Malinda Carpenter and Michael Tomasello",
year = "2006",
doi = "10.1207/s15327647jcd0703_9",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "411--430",
journal = "Journal of Cognition and Development",
issn = "1524-8372",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infants determine others' focus of attention by pragmatics and exclusion

AU - Moll, Henrike

AU - Koring, Cornelia

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

AU - Tomasello, Michael

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - In the studies presented here, infants' understanding of others' attention was assessed when gaze direction cues were not diagnostic. Fourteen-, 18- and 24-month-olds witnessed an adult look to the side of an object and express excitement. In 1 experimental condition this object was new for the adult because she was not present while the child and someone else played with it earlier. Children responded to this as if they assumed that the adult was excited about this new object as a whole. In the other condition the object was one with which the infant and this adult had just previously played for a minute. In this case children appeared to assume that the adult could not be excited about this object in itself. They responded either by attending to a specific part of the object or, more frequently, by looking around the room for another object. These results suggest that 1-year-olds can determine what others are attending to based on a pragmatic assessment of what is new and what is old for them combined with a form of reasoning by exclusion.

AB - In the studies presented here, infants' understanding of others' attention was assessed when gaze direction cues were not diagnostic. Fourteen-, 18- and 24-month-olds witnessed an adult look to the side of an object and express excitement. In 1 experimental condition this object was new for the adult because she was not present while the child and someone else played with it earlier. Children responded to this as if they assumed that the adult was excited about this new object as a whole. In the other condition the object was one with which the infant and this adult had just previously played for a minute. In this case children appeared to assume that the adult could not be excited about this object in itself. They responded either by attending to a specific part of the object or, more frequently, by looking around the room for another object. These results suggest that 1-year-olds can determine what others are attending to based on a pragmatic assessment of what is new and what is old for them combined with a form of reasoning by exclusion.

KW - MUTUAL EXCLUSIVITY

KW - 18-MONTH-OLDS

KW - OBJECTS

KW - WORDS

KW - GAZE

KW - CUES

KW - EYES

U2 - 10.1207/s15327647jcd0703_9

DO - 10.1207/s15327647jcd0703_9

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 411

EP - 430

JO - Journal of Cognition and Development

JF - Journal of Cognition and Development

SN - 1524-8372

IS - 3

ER -

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ID: 78732212

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