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Infants use shared experience to interpret pointing gestures

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Infants use shared experience to interpret pointing gestures. / Liebal, Kristin; Behne, Tanya; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael.

In: Developmental Science, Vol. 12, No. 2, 03.2009, p. 264-271.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Liebal, K, Behne, T, Carpenter, M & Tomasello, M 2009, 'Infants use shared experience to interpret pointing gestures', Developmental Science, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 264-271. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00758.x

APA

Liebal, K., Behne, T., Carpenter, M., & Tomasello, M. (2009). Infants use shared experience to interpret pointing gestures. Developmental Science, 12(2), 264-271. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00758.x

Vancouver

Liebal K, Behne T, Carpenter M, Tomasello M. Infants use shared experience to interpret pointing gestures. Developmental Science. 2009 Mar;12(2):264-271. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00758.x

Author

Liebal, Kristin ; Behne, Tanya ; Carpenter, Malinda ; Tomasello, Michael. / Infants use shared experience to interpret pointing gestures. In: Developmental Science. 2009 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 264-271.

Bibtex - Download

@article{ea4bb9315654477b8b3b33d74565f633,
title = "Infants use shared experience to interpret pointing gestures",
abstract = "We investigated whether 1-year-old infants use their shared experience with an adult to determine the meaning of a pointing gesture. In the first study, after two adults had each shared a different activity with the infant, one of the adults pointed to a target object. Eighteen- but not 14-month-olds responded appropriately to the pointing gesture based on the particular activity they had previously shared with that particular adult. In the second study, 14-month-olds were successful in a simpler procedure in which the pointing adult either had or had not shared a relevant activity with the infant prior to the pointing. Infants just beginning to learn language thus already show a complex understanding of the pragmatics of cooperative communication in which shared experience with particular individuals plays a crucial role.",
keywords = "AMBIGUOUS REQUESTS, 14-MONTH-OLDS KNOW, KNOWLEDGE",
author = "Kristin Liebal and Tanya Behne and Malinda Carpenter and Michael Tomasello",
year = "2009",
month = mar,
doi = "10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00758.x",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "264--271",
journal = "Developmental Science",
issn = "1363-755X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Infants use shared experience to interpret pointing gestures

AU - Liebal, Kristin

AU - Behne, Tanya

AU - Carpenter, Malinda

AU - Tomasello, Michael

PY - 2009/3

Y1 - 2009/3

N2 - We investigated whether 1-year-old infants use their shared experience with an adult to determine the meaning of a pointing gesture. In the first study, after two adults had each shared a different activity with the infant, one of the adults pointed to a target object. Eighteen- but not 14-month-olds responded appropriately to the pointing gesture based on the particular activity they had previously shared with that particular adult. In the second study, 14-month-olds were successful in a simpler procedure in which the pointing adult either had or had not shared a relevant activity with the infant prior to the pointing. Infants just beginning to learn language thus already show a complex understanding of the pragmatics of cooperative communication in which shared experience with particular individuals plays a crucial role.

AB - We investigated whether 1-year-old infants use their shared experience with an adult to determine the meaning of a pointing gesture. In the first study, after two adults had each shared a different activity with the infant, one of the adults pointed to a target object. Eighteen- but not 14-month-olds responded appropriately to the pointing gesture based on the particular activity they had previously shared with that particular adult. In the second study, 14-month-olds were successful in a simpler procedure in which the pointing adult either had or had not shared a relevant activity with the infant prior to the pointing. Infants just beginning to learn language thus already show a complex understanding of the pragmatics of cooperative communication in which shared experience with particular individuals plays a crucial role.

KW - AMBIGUOUS REQUESTS

KW - 14-MONTH-OLDS KNOW

KW - KNOWLEDGE

U2 - 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00758.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1467-7687.2008.00758.x

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 264

EP - 271

JO - Developmental Science

JF - Developmental Science

SN - 1363-755X

IS - 2

ER -

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