Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Information entropy of humpback whale songs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

Standard

Information entropy of humpback whale songs. / Suzuki, R ; Buck, J R ; Tyack, P L .

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 119, No. 3, 03.2006, p. 1849-1866.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Suzuki, R, Buck, JR & Tyack, PL 2006, 'Information entropy of humpback whale songs' Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 119, no. 3, pp. 1849-1866. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.2161827

APA

Suzuki, R., Buck, J. R., & Tyack, P. L. (2006). Information entropy of humpback whale songs. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 119(3), 1849-1866. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.2161827

Vancouver

Suzuki R, Buck JR, Tyack PL. Information entropy of humpback whale songs. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2006 Mar;119(3):1849-1866. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.2161827

Author

Suzuki, R ; Buck, J R ; Tyack, P L . / Information entropy of humpback whale songs. In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2006 ; Vol. 119, No. 3. pp. 1849-1866.

Bibtex - Download

@article{f84dd6625b744cacbdf282b0162e8239,
title = "Information entropy of humpback whale songs",
abstract = "The structure of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) songs was examined using information theory techniques. The song is an ordered sequence of individual sound elements separated by gaps of silence. Song samples were converted into sequences of discrete symbols by both human and automated classifiers. This paper analyzes the song structure in these symbol sequences using information entropy estimators and autocorrelation estimators. Both parametric and nonparametric entropy estimators are applied to the symbol sequences representing the songs. The results provide quantitative evidence consistent with the hierarchical structure proposed for these songs by Payne and McVay [Science 173, 587-597 (1971)]. Specifically, this analysis demonstrates that: (1) There is a strong structural constraint, or syntax, in the generation of the songs, and (2) the structural constraints exhibit periodicities with periods of 6-8 and 180-400 units. This implies that no empirical Markov model is capable of representing the songs' structure. The results are robust to the choice of either human or automated song-to-syrnbol classifiers. In addition, the entropy estimates indicate that the maximum amount of information that could be communicated by the sequence of sounds made is less than I bit per second. (c) 2006 Acoustical Society of America.",
author = "R Suzuki and Buck, {J R} and Tyack, {P L}",
year = "2006",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1121/1.2161827",
language = "English",
volume = "119",
pages = "1849--1866",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Information entropy of humpback whale songs

AU - Suzuki, R

AU - Buck, J R

AU - Tyack, P L

PY - 2006/3

Y1 - 2006/3

N2 - The structure of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) songs was examined using information theory techniques. The song is an ordered sequence of individual sound elements separated by gaps of silence. Song samples were converted into sequences of discrete symbols by both human and automated classifiers. This paper analyzes the song structure in these symbol sequences using information entropy estimators and autocorrelation estimators. Both parametric and nonparametric entropy estimators are applied to the symbol sequences representing the songs. The results provide quantitative evidence consistent with the hierarchical structure proposed for these songs by Payne and McVay [Science 173, 587-597 (1971)]. Specifically, this analysis demonstrates that: (1) There is a strong structural constraint, or syntax, in the generation of the songs, and (2) the structural constraints exhibit periodicities with periods of 6-8 and 180-400 units. This implies that no empirical Markov model is capable of representing the songs' structure. The results are robust to the choice of either human or automated song-to-syrnbol classifiers. In addition, the entropy estimates indicate that the maximum amount of information that could be communicated by the sequence of sounds made is less than I bit per second. (c) 2006 Acoustical Society of America.

AB - The structure of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) songs was examined using information theory techniques. The song is an ordered sequence of individual sound elements separated by gaps of silence. Song samples were converted into sequences of discrete symbols by both human and automated classifiers. This paper analyzes the song structure in these symbol sequences using information entropy estimators and autocorrelation estimators. Both parametric and nonparametric entropy estimators are applied to the symbol sequences representing the songs. The results provide quantitative evidence consistent with the hierarchical structure proposed for these songs by Payne and McVay [Science 173, 587-597 (1971)]. Specifically, this analysis demonstrates that: (1) There is a strong structural constraint, or syntax, in the generation of the songs, and (2) the structural constraints exhibit periodicities with periods of 6-8 and 180-400 units. This implies that no empirical Markov model is capable of representing the songs' structure. The results are robust to the choice of either human or automated song-to-syrnbol classifiers. In addition, the entropy estimates indicate that the maximum amount of information that could be communicated by the sequence of sounds made is less than I bit per second. (c) 2006 Acoustical Society of America.

U2 - 10.1121/1.2161827

DO - 10.1121/1.2161827

M3 - Article

VL - 119

SP - 1849

EP - 1866

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

T2 - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 3

ER -

Related by author

  1. A response to scientific and societal needs for marine biological observations

    Bax, N., Miloslavich, P., Muller-Karger, F. E., Allain, V., Appeltans, W., Batten, S. D., Benedetti-Cecchi, L., Buttigieg, P. L., Chiba, S., Costa, D. P., Duffy, J. E., Dunn, D. C., Johnson, C. R., Kudela, R. M., Obura, D., Rebelo, L-M., Shin, Y-J., Simmons, S. E. & Tyack, P. L., 17 Jul 2019, In : Frontiers in Marine Science. 6, 22 p., 395.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Evidence for discrimination between feeding sounds of familiar fish and unfamiliar mammal-eating killer whale ecotypes by long-finned pilot whales

    Curé, C., Isojunno, S., I Vester, H., Visser, F., Oudejans, M., Biassoni, N., Massenet, M., Barluet de Beauchesne, L., J Wensveen, P., Sivle, L. D., Tyack, P. L. & Miller, P. J. O., 22 Jun 2019, In : Animal Cognition. First Online, 20 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Foraging rates of ram-filtering North Atlantic right whales

    van der Hoop, J. M., Nousek-McGregor, A. E., Nowacek, D. P., Parks, S. E., Tyack, P. & Madsen, P. T., 10 Jun 2019, In : Functional Ecology. Early View, 18 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Northern bottlenose whales in a pristine environment respond strongly to close and distant navy sonar signals

    Wensveen, P. J., Isojunno, S., Hansen, R. R., Von Benda-beckmann, A. M., Kleivane, L., Van Ijsselmuide, S., Lam, F. A., Kvadsheim, P. H., Deruiter, S. L., Curé, C., Narazaki, T., Tyack, P. L. & Miller, P. J. O., 20 Mar 2019, In : Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 286, 1899, 10 p., 20182592.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Diving behavior and fine-scale kinematics of free-ranging Risso’s dolphins foraging in shallow and deep-water habitats

    Arranz, P., Benoit-Bird, K., Friedlaender, A. S., Hazen, E. L., Goldbogen, J. A., Stimpert, A. K., De Ruiter, S. L., Calambokidis, J., Southall, B., Fahlman, A. & Tyack, P. L., 12 Mar 2019, In : Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 7, 15 p., 53.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Predicting acoustic dose associated with marine mammal behavioural responses to sound as detected with fixed acoustic recorders and satellite tags

    von Benda-Beckmann, A. M., Wensveen, P. J., Prior, M., Ainslie, M. A., Hansen, R. R., Isojunno, S., Lam, F. P. A., Kvadsheim, P. H. & Miller, P. J. O., 20 Mar 2019, In : Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 145, 3, p. 1401-1416 16 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Fin whale density and distribution estimation using acoustic bearings derived from sparse arrays

    Harris, D. V., Miksis-Olds, J. L., Vernon, J. A. & Thomas, L., May 2018, In : Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 143, 5, p. 2980-2993 14 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Modelling the broadband propagation of marine mammal echolocation clicks for click-based population density estimates

    von Benda-Beckmann, A., Thomas, L. J., Tyack, P. L. & Ainslie, M., Feb 2018, In : Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 143, 2, p. 954-967

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Two unit analysis of Sri Lankan pygmy blue whale song over a decade

    Miksis-Olds, J. L., Nieukirk, S. L. & Harris, D. V., 31 Dec 2018, In : Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 144, 6, p. 3618-3626 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 20035481