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Intense ultrasonic clicks from echolocating toothed whales do not elicit anti-predator responses or debilitate the squid Loligo pealeii

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

Standard

Intense ultrasonic clicks from echolocating toothed whales do not elicit anti-predator responses or debilitate the squid Loligo pealeii. / Wilson, Maria; Hanlon, Roger T.; Tyack, Peter L.; Madsen, Peter T.

In: Biology Letters, Vol. 3, No. 3, 22.06.2007, p. 225-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Wilson, M, Hanlon, RT, Tyack, PL & Madsen, PT 2007, 'Intense ultrasonic clicks from echolocating toothed whales do not elicit anti-predator responses or debilitate the squid Loligo pealeii', Biology Letters, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 225-227. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2007.0005

APA

Wilson, M., Hanlon, R. T., Tyack, P. L., & Madsen, P. T. (2007). Intense ultrasonic clicks from echolocating toothed whales do not elicit anti-predator responses or debilitate the squid Loligo pealeii. Biology Letters, 3(3), 225-227. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2007.0005

Vancouver

Wilson M, Hanlon RT, Tyack PL, Madsen PT. Intense ultrasonic clicks from echolocating toothed whales do not elicit anti-predator responses or debilitate the squid Loligo pealeii. Biology Letters. 2007 Jun 22;3(3):225-227. https://doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2007.0005

Author

Wilson, Maria ; Hanlon, Roger T. ; Tyack, Peter L. ; Madsen, Peter T. / Intense ultrasonic clicks from echolocating toothed whales do not elicit anti-predator responses or debilitate the squid Loligo pealeii. In: Biology Letters. 2007 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 225-227.

Bibtex - Download

@article{96a8e21426174478b37f3f120fb28354,
title = "Intense ultrasonic clicks from echolocating toothed whales do not elicit anti-predator responses or debilitate the squid Loligo pealeii",
abstract = "Toothed whales use intense ultrasonic clicks to echolocate prey and it has been hypothesized that they also acoustically debilitate their prey with these intense sound pulses to facilitate capture. Cephalopods are an important food source for toothed whales, and there has probably been an evolutionary selection pressure on cephalopods to develop a mechanism for detecting and evading sound-emitting toothed whale predators. Ultrasonic detection has evolved in some insects to avoid echolocating bats, and it can be hypothesized that cephalopods might have evolved similar ultrasound detection as an anti-predation measure. We test this hypothesis in the squid Loligo pealeii in a playback experiment using intense echolocation clicks from two squid-eating toothed whale species. Twelve squid were exposed to clicks at two repetition rates (16 and 125 clicks per second) with received sound pressure levels of 199-226 dB re 1 mu Pa (pp) n-mimicking the sound exposure from an echolocating toothed whale as it approaches and captures prey. We demonstrate that intense ultrasonic clicks do not elicit any detectable anti-predator behaviour in L. pealeii and that clicks with received levels up to 226 dB re 1 mu Pa (pp) do not acoustically debilitate this cephalopod species.",
author = "Maria Wilson and Hanlon, {Roger T.} and Tyack, {Peter L.} and Madsen, {Peter T.}",
year = "2007",
month = "6",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1098/rsbl.2007.0005",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "225--227",
journal = "Biology Letters",
issn = "1744-9561",
publisher = "The Royal Society",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Intense ultrasonic clicks from echolocating toothed whales do not elicit anti-predator responses or debilitate the squid Loligo pealeii

AU - Wilson, Maria

AU - Hanlon, Roger T.

AU - Tyack, Peter L.

AU - Madsen, Peter T.

PY - 2007/6/22

Y1 - 2007/6/22

N2 - Toothed whales use intense ultrasonic clicks to echolocate prey and it has been hypothesized that they also acoustically debilitate their prey with these intense sound pulses to facilitate capture. Cephalopods are an important food source for toothed whales, and there has probably been an evolutionary selection pressure on cephalopods to develop a mechanism for detecting and evading sound-emitting toothed whale predators. Ultrasonic detection has evolved in some insects to avoid echolocating bats, and it can be hypothesized that cephalopods might have evolved similar ultrasound detection as an anti-predation measure. We test this hypothesis in the squid Loligo pealeii in a playback experiment using intense echolocation clicks from two squid-eating toothed whale species. Twelve squid were exposed to clicks at two repetition rates (16 and 125 clicks per second) with received sound pressure levels of 199-226 dB re 1 mu Pa (pp) n-mimicking the sound exposure from an echolocating toothed whale as it approaches and captures prey. We demonstrate that intense ultrasonic clicks do not elicit any detectable anti-predator behaviour in L. pealeii and that clicks with received levels up to 226 dB re 1 mu Pa (pp) do not acoustically debilitate this cephalopod species.

AB - Toothed whales use intense ultrasonic clicks to echolocate prey and it has been hypothesized that they also acoustically debilitate their prey with these intense sound pulses to facilitate capture. Cephalopods are an important food source for toothed whales, and there has probably been an evolutionary selection pressure on cephalopods to develop a mechanism for detecting and evading sound-emitting toothed whale predators. Ultrasonic detection has evolved in some insects to avoid echolocating bats, and it can be hypothesized that cephalopods might have evolved similar ultrasound detection as an anti-predation measure. We test this hypothesis in the squid Loligo pealeii in a playback experiment using intense echolocation clicks from two squid-eating toothed whale species. Twelve squid were exposed to clicks at two repetition rates (16 and 125 clicks per second) with received sound pressure levels of 199-226 dB re 1 mu Pa (pp) n-mimicking the sound exposure from an echolocating toothed whale as it approaches and captures prey. We demonstrate that intense ultrasonic clicks do not elicit any detectable anti-predator behaviour in L. pealeii and that clicks with received levels up to 226 dB re 1 mu Pa (pp) do not acoustically debilitate this cephalopod species.

U2 - 10.1098/rsbl.2007.0005

DO - 10.1098/rsbl.2007.0005

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 225

EP - 227

JO - Biology Letters

JF - Biology Letters

SN - 1744-9561

IS - 3

ER -

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