Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Inter- and intra-year variation in foraging areas of breeding kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Standard

Inter- and intra-year variation in foraging areas of breeding kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla). / Robertson, G. S.; Bolton, M.; Grecian, W. J.; Monaghan, P.

In: Marine Biology, Vol. 161, No. 9, 09.2014, p. 1973-1986.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Robertson, GS, Bolton, M, Grecian, WJ & Monaghan, P 2014, 'Inter- and intra-year variation in foraging areas of breeding kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla)' Marine Biology, vol. 161, no. 9, pp. 1973-1986. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-014-2477-8

APA

Robertson, G. S., Bolton, M., Grecian, W. J., & Monaghan, P. (2014). Inter- and intra-year variation in foraging areas of breeding kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla). Marine Biology, 161(9), 1973-1986. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-014-2477-8

Vancouver

Robertson GS, Bolton M, Grecian WJ, Monaghan P. Inter- and intra-year variation in foraging areas of breeding kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla). Marine Biology. 2014 Sep;161(9):1973-1986. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-014-2477-8

Author

Robertson, G. S. ; Bolton, M. ; Grecian, W. J. ; Monaghan, P. / Inter- and intra-year variation in foraging areas of breeding kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla). In: Marine Biology. 2014 ; Vol. 161, No. 9. pp. 1973-1986.

Bibtex - Download

@article{81d1a8a6e6df482cb57de40af2d7bc02,
title = "Inter- and intra-year variation in foraging areas of breeding kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla)",
abstract = "While seabird conservation efforts have largely focused on protection from threats at the colony (e.g. reducing disturbance and predation), attention is increasingly being given to implementing protection measures for foraging areas at sea. For this to be effective, important foraging areas must be identified. Although numerous studies have examined seabird foraging behaviour, information is still lacking on the variability in area utilisation within and among breeding seasons. GPS devices were attached to adult black-legged kittiwakes breeding at an expanding North Sea colony (55°20′N, 1°32′W) during both incubation and chick-rearing in 2012 and during chick-rearing in 2011, to determine whether foraging areas remained consistent and to identify the oceanographic characteristics of areas used for foraging. The type and size of prey items consumed at different stages of the breeding cycle was also examined. During incubation (April-May 2012), kittiwakes foraged substantially further from the colony and fed on larger sandeels than when feeding chicks, and there was significant inter-annual variation in foraging areas used during the chick-rearing period (June-July 2011 and 2012). Foraging areas were characterised by cooler sea surface temperatures and areas of high chlorophyll a concentration, although association with specific oceanographic features changed within the breeding season and between years. These results emphasise the importance of considering how foraging areas and reliance on specific oceanographic conditions change over time when seeking to identify important marine areas for seabirds.",
author = "Robertson, {G. S.} and M. Bolton and Grecian, {W. J.} and P. Monaghan",
note = "This work was supported by the National Environment Research Council (award number NE/I528369/1) and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds through a CASE studentship to the University of Glasgow.",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1007/s00227-014-2477-8",
language = "English",
volume = "161",
pages = "1973--1986",
journal = "Marine Biology",
issn = "0025-3162",
publisher = "Springer-Verlag",
number = "9",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Inter- and intra-year variation in foraging areas of breeding kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla)

AU - Robertson, G. S.

AU - Bolton, M.

AU - Grecian, W. J.

AU - Monaghan, P.

N1 - This work was supported by the National Environment Research Council (award number NE/I528369/1) and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds through a CASE studentship to the University of Glasgow.

PY - 2014/9

Y1 - 2014/9

N2 - While seabird conservation efforts have largely focused on protection from threats at the colony (e.g. reducing disturbance and predation), attention is increasingly being given to implementing protection measures for foraging areas at sea. For this to be effective, important foraging areas must be identified. Although numerous studies have examined seabird foraging behaviour, information is still lacking on the variability in area utilisation within and among breeding seasons. GPS devices were attached to adult black-legged kittiwakes breeding at an expanding North Sea colony (55°20′N, 1°32′W) during both incubation and chick-rearing in 2012 and during chick-rearing in 2011, to determine whether foraging areas remained consistent and to identify the oceanographic characteristics of areas used for foraging. The type and size of prey items consumed at different stages of the breeding cycle was also examined. During incubation (April-May 2012), kittiwakes foraged substantially further from the colony and fed on larger sandeels than when feeding chicks, and there was significant inter-annual variation in foraging areas used during the chick-rearing period (June-July 2011 and 2012). Foraging areas were characterised by cooler sea surface temperatures and areas of high chlorophyll a concentration, although association with specific oceanographic features changed within the breeding season and between years. These results emphasise the importance of considering how foraging areas and reliance on specific oceanographic conditions change over time when seeking to identify important marine areas for seabirds.

AB - While seabird conservation efforts have largely focused on protection from threats at the colony (e.g. reducing disturbance and predation), attention is increasingly being given to implementing protection measures for foraging areas at sea. For this to be effective, important foraging areas must be identified. Although numerous studies have examined seabird foraging behaviour, information is still lacking on the variability in area utilisation within and among breeding seasons. GPS devices were attached to adult black-legged kittiwakes breeding at an expanding North Sea colony (55°20′N, 1°32′W) during both incubation and chick-rearing in 2012 and during chick-rearing in 2011, to determine whether foraging areas remained consistent and to identify the oceanographic characteristics of areas used for foraging. The type and size of prey items consumed at different stages of the breeding cycle was also examined. During incubation (April-May 2012), kittiwakes foraged substantially further from the colony and fed on larger sandeels than when feeding chicks, and there was significant inter-annual variation in foraging areas used during the chick-rearing period (June-July 2011 and 2012). Foraging areas were characterised by cooler sea surface temperatures and areas of high chlorophyll a concentration, although association with specific oceanographic features changed within the breeding season and between years. These results emphasise the importance of considering how foraging areas and reliance on specific oceanographic conditions change over time when seeking to identify important marine areas for seabirds.

U2 - 10.1007/s00227-014-2477-8

DO - 10.1007/s00227-014-2477-8

M3 - Article

VL - 161

SP - 1973

EP - 1986

JO - Marine Biology

T2 - Marine Biology

JF - Marine Biology

SN - 0025-3162

IS - 9

ER -

Related by author

  1. Individual spatial consistency and dietary flexibility in the migratory behavior of northern gannets wintering in the Northeast Atlantic

    Grecian, W. J., Williams, H. J., Votier, S. C., Bearhop, S., Cleasby, I. R., Grémillet, D., Hamer, K. C., Le Nuz, M., Lescroël, A., Newton, J., Patrick, S. C., Phillips, R. A., Wakefield, E. D. & Bodey, T. W., 12 Jun 2019, In : Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. 7, 11 p., 214.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Important at-sea areas of colonial breeding marine predators on the southern Patagonian Shelf

    Baylis, A. M. M., Tierney, M., Orben, R. A., Warwick-Evans, V., Wakefield, E., Grecian, W. J., Trathan, P., Reisinger, R., Ratcliffe, N., Croxall, J., Campioni, L., Catry, P., Crofts, S., Boersma, P. D., Galimberti, F., Granadeiro, J., Handley, J., Hayes, S., Hedd, A., Masello, J. F. & 7 othersMontevecchi, W. A., Pütz, K., Quillfeldt, P., Rebstock, G. A., Sanvito, S., Staniland, I. J. & Brickle, P., 11 Jun 2019, In : Scientific Reports. 9, 13 p., 8517.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Marine protected areas show low overlap with projected distributions of seabird populations in Britain and Ireland

    Critchley, E. J., Grecian, W. J., Kane, A., Jessopp, M. J. & Quinn, J. L., Aug 2018, In : Biological Conservation. 224, p. 309-317 9 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Understanding the ontogeny of foraging behaviour: insights from combining marine predator bio-logging with satellite-derived oceanography in hidden Markov models

    Grecian, W. J., Lane, J., Michelot, T., Wade, H. M. & Hamer, K. C., 6 Jun 2018, In : Journal of the Royal Society Interface. 15, 143, 9 p., 20180084.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Man-made structures and Apex Predators: Spatial interactions and overlap (MAPS)

    Grecian, W. J., Masden, E. A., Hammond, P. S., Owen, E., Daunt, F., Wanless, S. & Russell, D. JF., Jan 2018, INSITE.

    Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Related by journal

  1. Marine Biology (Journal)

    Nora Nell Hanson (Reviewer)
    Mar 2011

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

Related by journal

  1. Behavioural and temporal partitioning of dolphin social groups in the northern Adriatic Sea

    Genov, T., Centrih, T., Kotnjek, P. & Hace, A., Jan 2019, In : Marine Biology. 166, 1, 11 p., 166.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Icelandic herring-eating killer whales feed at night

    Gaëtan, R., Filatova, O. A., Samarra, F. I. P., Fedutin, I. D., Lammers, M. & Miller, P., Feb 2017, In : Marine Biology. 164, 2, 32.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Movements and site fidelity of killer whales (Orcinus orca) relative to seasonal and long-term shifts in herring (Clupea harengus) distribution

    Samarra, F. I. P., Tavares, S. B., Béesau, J., Deecke, V. B., Fennell, A., Miller, P. J. O., Pétursson, H., Sigurjónsson, J. & Víkingsson, G. A., 1 Aug 2017, In : Marine Biology. 164, 15 p., 159.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Marine life of the sea trout

    Thorstad, E. B., Todd, C. D., Uglem, I., Bjørn, P. A., Gargan, P. G., Vollset, K. W., Halttunen, E., Kålås, S., Berg, M. & Finstad, B., Mar 2016, In : Marine Biology. 163, 3, 19 p., 47.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Reproductive strategies and energy sources fuelling reproductive growth in a protracted spawner

    Mendo, T., Semmens, J. M., Lyle, J. M., Tracey, S. R. & Moltschaniwskyj, N., 5 Jan 2016, In : Marine Biology. 163, 2.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 249954407