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International corporate tax avoidance and domestic government health expenditure

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Abstract

Objective To compare estimated losses from international corporate tax avoidance in individual countries and domestic government health expenditure, with reference to the annual threshold of 86 United States dollars (US$) per capita required to achieve universal health coverage.
Methods I obtained and compared estimates of international corporate tax avoidance and domestic government health expenditure for 2013.
Findings Data were available for 100 countries: 24 low-, 28 lower-middle-, 21 upper-middle- and 27 high-income countries. Domestic government health expenditure was under US$ 86 per capita in all 24 low-income countries and in 24 of 28 lower-middle-income countries. International corporate tax lost per capita was higher than domestic government health expenditure in 19 low-income and 10 lower-middle-income countries. If the revenue lost to tax avoidance were recouped and allocated to the health sector, average annual government health expenditure could increase from US$ 8 to US$ 24 per capita in the low-income countries studied and from US$ 54 to US$ 91 per capita in the lower-middle-income countries.
Conclusion Recouping losses due to international corporate tax avoidance and allocating them to the health sector would help low- and lower-middle-income countries achieve universal health coverage, a target of sustainable development goal (SDG) 3. Tackling tax avoidance requires cooperation between the governments of all countries, multinational corporations and investors, including private individuals. International cooperation to improve domestic resource mobilization is the focus of SDG target 17.1
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Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)729-788
Number of pages8
JournalBulletin of the World Health Organization
Volume97
Issue number11
Early online date3 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2019

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