Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Latitudinal variation in arrival and breeding phenology of the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca using large-scale citizen science data

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

DOI

Author(s)

P.G. Nicolau, M.D. Burgess, T.A. Marques, S.R. Baillie, N.J. Moran, D.I. Leech, A. Johnston

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Many species have advanced the timing of annual reproductive cycles in response to climatic warming, sometimes leading to asynchrony between trophic levels, with negative population consequences. Long-distance migratory birds, reliant on short seasonal food pulses for breeding, are considered particularly susceptible to such disjunction because late arrival may preclude optimal timing of egg-laying. It is unknown whether the relative timing of arrival and egg-laying is sufficiently plastic, in time and space, to enable an adaptive response when arrival times change relative to local food resources. We used citizen science data, describing pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca arrival and egg-laying dates, to explore temporal (2013–2016) and spatial (across Great Britain) variation in the phenology of arrival, laying and their difference. To assess the long-term trend in arrival and laying at a single location, we used data from a long-term field study. The arrival-laying interval was consistently shorter in the north, driven by the contrast between spatial variation in arrival date and spatial invariance in laying date. To understand whether a short arrival-laying interval may have consequences for productivity, we assessed the association between this interval and clutch size. We found no statistically significant correlation between these two variables. To examine long-term changes in arrival and laying dates, we focussed on a single location in southwestern England. Both dates of first male arrival and first egg laid in a season advanced since 1986, with no evidence of interval shortening. Together, our results demonstrate spatial and annual variation in the arrival-laying interval, with no detected effect on fecundity. Thus, the interval from arrival to laying is likely dictated by spatially and temporally varying local conditions, suggesting these migrant birds may have the ability to adapt this interval to align with local conditions and mitigate potential mismatch impacts.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Avian Biology
Volume52
Issue number2
Early online date12 Feb 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Feb 2021

    Research areas

  • Arrival date, BirdTrack, Interval, Laying date, Nest Record Scheme, Phenology mismatch

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Allometric relationships to assess ontogenetic adaptative changes in three NE Atlantic commercial sea cucumbers (Echinodermata, Holothuroidea)

    Azevedo e Silva, F., Brito, A. C., Simões, T., Pombo, A., Marques, T. A., Rocha, C., Sousa, J., Venâncio, E. & Félix, P. M., Jun 2021, In: Aquatic Ecology. 55, p. 711-720

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Estimating acoustic cue rates in bowhead whales, Balaena mysticetus, during their fall migration through the Alaskan Beaufort Sea

    Blackwell, S. B., Thode, A. M., Conrad, A. S., Ferguson, M. C., Berchok, C. L., Stafford, K. M., Marques, T. A. & Kim, K. H., 26 May 2021, In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 149, 5, p. 3611-3625 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Trends in cetacean research in the Eastern North Atlantic

    Cartagena-Matos, B., Lugué, K., Fonseca, P., Marques, T. A., Prieto, R. & Alves, F., 17 Feb 2021, In: Mammal Review. 18 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

  4. COVID-19: nothing is normal in this pandemic

    Gonçalves, L., Turkman, M. A. A., Geraldes, C., Marques, T. A. & Sousa, L., 20 Jan 2021, (E-pub ahead of print) In: Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health. In Press

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. Deep-diving beaked whales dive together but forage apart

    Alcázar-Treviño, J., Johnson, M., Arranz, P., Warren, V. E., Pérez-González, C. J., Marques, T., Madsen, P. T. & Aguilar de Soto, N., 13 Jan 2021, In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 288, 1942, 20201905.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Related by journal

  1. Journal of Avian Biology (Journal)

    Will Cresswell (Reviewer)

    23 Mar 2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

Related by journal

  1. The correlates of intraspecific variation in nest height and nest building duration in the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus

    der Weduwen, D., Keogan, K., Samplonius, J. M., Phillimore, A. B. & Shutt, J. D., 12 Feb 2021, (E-pub ahead of print) In: Journal of Avian Biology. Early View, 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Duet codes do not enhance neighbour recognition in two closely related species of duetting neotropical wrens

    Quiros Guerrero, E., Rivera-Cáceres, K., Janeiro Silva, M. J., Cresswell, W. & Templeton, C. N., 27 Jan 2021, (E-pub ahead of print) In: Journal of Avian Biology. Early View

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  3. Regional wind patterns likely shape a seasonal migration detour

    Patchett, R. & Cresswell, W., 20 Nov 2020, In: Journal of Avian Biology. 51, 11, 6 p., e02466.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Evidence of repertoire sharing and stability despite a high turnover rate in a duetting neotropical wren

    Quiros Guerrero, E., Janeiro Silva, M. J., Cresswell, W. & Templeton, C. N., Jun 2020, In: Journal of Avian Biology. 51, 6, 12 p., e02382.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 273735264

Top