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Learning from their own actions: the unique effect of producing actions on infants’ action understanding

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Learning from their own actions : the unique effect of producing actions on infants’ action understanding. / Gerson, Sarah; Woodward, Amanda.

In: Child Development, Vol. 85, No. 1, 02.2014, p. 264-277.

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Gerson, S & Woodward, A 2014, 'Learning from their own actions: the unique effect of producing actions on infants’ action understanding', Child Development, vol. 85, no. 1, pp. 264-277. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12115

APA

Gerson, S., & Woodward, A. (2014). Learning from their own actions: the unique effect of producing actions on infants’ action understanding. Child Development, 85(1), 264-277. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12115

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Gerson S, Woodward A. Learning from their own actions: the unique effect of producing actions on infants’ action understanding. Child Development. 2014 Feb;85(1):264-277. https://doi.org/10.1111/cdev.12115

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Gerson, Sarah ; Woodward, Amanda. / Learning from their own actions : the unique effect of producing actions on infants’ action understanding. In: Child Development. 2014 ; Vol. 85, No. 1. pp. 264-277.

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@article{1a22d5b640674d709868fe9137877667,
title = "Learning from their own actions: the unique effect of producing actions on infants’ action understanding",
abstract = "Prior research suggests that infants' action production affects their action understanding, but little is known about the aspects of motor experience that render these effects. In Study 1, the relative contributions of self-produced (n = 30) and observational (n = 30) action experience on 3-month-old infants' action understanding was assessed using a visual habituation paradigm. In Study 2, generalization of training to a new context was examined (n = 30). Results revealed a unique effect of active over observational experience. Furthermore, findings suggest that benefits of trained actions do not generalize broadly, at least following brief training.",
author = "Sarah Gerson and Amanda Woodward",
note = "This work was funded by two grants to the second author (R01 HD35707 and P01HD064653)",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1111/cdev.12115",
language = "English",
volume = "85",
pages = "264--277",
journal = "Child Development",
issn = "0009-3920",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Learning from their own actions

T2 - the unique effect of producing actions on infants’ action understanding

AU - Gerson, Sarah

AU - Woodward, Amanda

N1 - This work was funded by two grants to the second author (R01 HD35707 and P01HD064653)

PY - 2014/2

Y1 - 2014/2

N2 - Prior research suggests that infants' action production affects their action understanding, but little is known about the aspects of motor experience that render these effects. In Study 1, the relative contributions of self-produced (n = 30) and observational (n = 30) action experience on 3-month-old infants' action understanding was assessed using a visual habituation paradigm. In Study 2, generalization of training to a new context was examined (n = 30). Results revealed a unique effect of active over observational experience. Furthermore, findings suggest that benefits of trained actions do not generalize broadly, at least following brief training.

AB - Prior research suggests that infants' action production affects their action understanding, but little is known about the aspects of motor experience that render these effects. In Study 1, the relative contributions of self-produced (n = 30) and observational (n = 30) action experience on 3-month-old infants' action understanding was assessed using a visual habituation paradigm. In Study 2, generalization of training to a new context was examined (n = 30). Results revealed a unique effect of active over observational experience. Furthermore, findings suggest that benefits of trained actions do not generalize broadly, at least following brief training.

U2 - 10.1111/cdev.12115

DO - 10.1111/cdev.12115

M3 - Article

VL - 85

SP - 264

EP - 277

JO - Child Development

JF - Child Development

SN - 0009-3920

IS - 1

ER -

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