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Life-long epigenetic programming of cortical architecture by maternal ‘Western’ diet during pregnancy

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  • Embargoed (until 18/05/20)

Author(s)

Valentina Cinquina, Daniela Calvigioni, Matthias Farlik, Florian Halbritter, Victoria Fife-Gernedl, Sally Lorna Shirran, Matthew Alexander Fuszard, Catherine Helen Botting, Patrick Poullet, Fabinan Piscitelli, Zoltán Máte, Gábor Szabo, Yuchio Yanagawa, Siegfried Kasper, Vincenzo Di Marzo, Ken Mackie, Chris McBain, Christoph Bock, Erik Keimpema, Tibor Harkany

School/Research organisations

Abstract

The evolution of human diets led to preferences toward polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) content with ‘Western’ diets enriched in ω-6 PUFAs. Mounting evidence points to ω-6 PUFA excess limiting metabolic and cognitive processes that define longevity in humans. When chosen during pregnancy, ω-6 PUFA-enriched ‘Western’ diets can reprogram maternal bodily metabolism with maternal nutrient supply precipitating the body-wide imprinting of molecular and cellular adaptations at the level of long-range intercellular signaling networks in the unborn fetus. Even though unfavorable neurological outcomes are amongst the most common complications of intrauterine ω-6 PUFA excess, cellular underpinnings of life-long modifications to brain architecture remain unknown. Here, we show that nutritional ω-6 PUFA-derived endocannabinoids desensitize CB1 cannabinoid receptors, thus inducing epigenetic repression of transcriptional regulatory networks controlling neuronal differentiation. We found that cortical neurons lose their positional identity and axonal selectivity when mouse fetuses are exposed to excess ω-6 PUFAs in utero. Conversion of ω-6 PUFAs into endocannabinoids disrupted the temporal precision of signaling at neuronal CB1 cannabinoid receptors, chiefly deregulating Stat3-dependent transcriptional cascades otherwise required to execute neuronal differentiation programs. Global proteomics identified the immunoglobulin family of cell adhesion molecules (IgCAMs) as direct substrates, with DNA methylation and chromatin accessibility profiling uncovering epigenetic reprogramming at >1400 sites in neurons after prolonged cannabinoid exposure. We found anxiety and depression-like behavioral traits to manifest in adult offspring, which is consistent with genetic models of reduced IgCAM expression, to suggest causality for cortical wiring defects. Overall, our data uncover a regulatory mechanism whose disruption by maternal food choices could limit an offspring’s brain function for life.
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Original languageEnglish
Number of pages15
JournalMolecular Psychiatry
Early online date18 Nov 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Nov 2019

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