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Manatee (Trichechus manatus) vocalization usage in relation to environmental noise levels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

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Manatee (Trichechus manatus) vocalization usage in relation to environmental noise levels. / Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L.; Tyack, Peter L.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 125, No. 3, 03.2009, p. 1806-1815.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Miksis-Olds, JL & Tyack, PL 2009, 'Manatee (Trichechus manatus) vocalization usage in relation to environmental noise levels', Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 125, no. 3, pp. 1806-1815. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.3068455

APA

Miksis-Olds, J. L., & Tyack, P. L. (2009). Manatee (Trichechus manatus) vocalization usage in relation to environmental noise levels. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 125(3), 1806-1815. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.3068455

Vancouver

Miksis-Olds JL, Tyack PL. Manatee (Trichechus manatus) vocalization usage in relation to environmental noise levels. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2009 Mar;125(3):1806-1815. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.3068455

Author

Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L. ; Tyack, Peter L. / Manatee (Trichechus manatus) vocalization usage in relation to environmental noise levels. In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America. 2009 ; Vol. 125, No. 3. pp. 1806-1815.

Bibtex - Download

@article{8e26db51729744d0b95db62d05c98911,
title = "Manatee (Trichechus manatus) vocalization usage in relation to environmental noise levels",
abstract = "Noise can interfere with acoustic communication by masking signals that contain biologically important information. Communication theory recognizes several ways a sender can modify its acoustic signal to compensate for noise, including increasing the source level of a signal, its repetition, its duration, shifting frequency outside that of the noise band, or shifting the timing of signal emission outside of noise periods. The extent to which animals would be expected to use these compensation mechanisms depends on the benefit of successful communication, risk of failure, and the cost of compensation. Here we study whether a coastal marine mammal, the manatee, can modify vocalizations as a function of behavioral context and ambient noise level. To investigate whether and how manatees modify their vocalizations, natural vocalization usage and structure were examined in terms of vocalization rate, duration, frequency, and source level. Vocalizations were classified into two call types, chirps and squeaks, which were analyzed independently. In conditions of elevated noise levels, call rates decreased during feeding and social behaviors, and the duration of each call type was differently influenced by the presence of calves. These results suggest that ambient noise levels do have a detectable effect on manatee communication and that manatees modify their vocalizations as a function of noise in specific behavioral contexts.",
author = "Miksis-Olds, {Jennifer L.} and Tyack, {Peter L.}",
year = "2009",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1121/1.3068455",
language = "English",
volume = "125",
pages = "1806--1815",
journal = "Journal of the Acoustical Society of America",
issn = "0001-4966",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",
number = "3",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Manatee (Trichechus manatus) vocalization usage in relation to environmental noise levels

AU - Miksis-Olds, Jennifer L.

AU - Tyack, Peter L.

PY - 2009/3

Y1 - 2009/3

N2 - Noise can interfere with acoustic communication by masking signals that contain biologically important information. Communication theory recognizes several ways a sender can modify its acoustic signal to compensate for noise, including increasing the source level of a signal, its repetition, its duration, shifting frequency outside that of the noise band, or shifting the timing of signal emission outside of noise periods. The extent to which animals would be expected to use these compensation mechanisms depends on the benefit of successful communication, risk of failure, and the cost of compensation. Here we study whether a coastal marine mammal, the manatee, can modify vocalizations as a function of behavioral context and ambient noise level. To investigate whether and how manatees modify their vocalizations, natural vocalization usage and structure were examined in terms of vocalization rate, duration, frequency, and source level. Vocalizations were classified into two call types, chirps and squeaks, which were analyzed independently. In conditions of elevated noise levels, call rates decreased during feeding and social behaviors, and the duration of each call type was differently influenced by the presence of calves. These results suggest that ambient noise levels do have a detectable effect on manatee communication and that manatees modify their vocalizations as a function of noise in specific behavioral contexts.

AB - Noise can interfere with acoustic communication by masking signals that contain biologically important information. Communication theory recognizes several ways a sender can modify its acoustic signal to compensate for noise, including increasing the source level of a signal, its repetition, its duration, shifting frequency outside that of the noise band, or shifting the timing of signal emission outside of noise periods. The extent to which animals would be expected to use these compensation mechanisms depends on the benefit of successful communication, risk of failure, and the cost of compensation. Here we study whether a coastal marine mammal, the manatee, can modify vocalizations as a function of behavioral context and ambient noise level. To investigate whether and how manatees modify their vocalizations, natural vocalization usage and structure were examined in terms of vocalization rate, duration, frequency, and source level. Vocalizations were classified into two call types, chirps and squeaks, which were analyzed independently. In conditions of elevated noise levels, call rates decreased during feeding and social behaviors, and the duration of each call type was differently influenced by the presence of calves. These results suggest that ambient noise levels do have a detectable effect on manatee communication and that manatees modify their vocalizations as a function of noise in specific behavioral contexts.

U2 - 10.1121/1.3068455

DO - 10.1121/1.3068455

M3 - Article

VL - 125

SP - 1806

EP - 1815

JO - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

JF - Journal of the Acoustical Society of America

SN - 0001-4966

IS - 3

ER -

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ID: 20036209

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