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Marine Mammal Behavioral Response Studies in Southern California: Advances in Technology and Experimental Methods

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Marine Mammal Behavioral Response Studies in Southern California: Advances in Technology and Experimental Methods. / Southall, Brandon L.; Moretti, David; Abraham, Bruce; Calambokidis, John; De Ruiter, Stacy Lynn; Tyack, Peter L.

In: Marine Technology Society Journal, Vol. 46, No. 4, 2012, p. 48-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Southall, BL, Moretti, D, Abraham, B, Calambokidis, J, De Ruiter, SL & Tyack, PL 2012, 'Marine Mammal Behavioral Response Studies in Southern California: Advances in Technology and Experimental Methods', Marine Technology Society Journal, vol. 46, no. 4, pp. 48-59.

APA

Southall, B. L., Moretti, D., Abraham, B., Calambokidis, J., De Ruiter, S. L., & Tyack, P. L. (2012). Marine Mammal Behavioral Response Studies in Southern California: Advances in Technology and Experimental Methods. Marine Technology Society Journal, 46(4), 48-59.

Vancouver

Southall BL, Moretti D, Abraham B, Calambokidis J, De Ruiter SL, Tyack PL. Marine Mammal Behavioral Response Studies in Southern California: Advances in Technology and Experimental Methods. Marine Technology Society Journal. 2012;46(4):48-59.

Author

Southall, Brandon L. ; Moretti, David ; Abraham, Bruce ; Calambokidis, John ; De Ruiter, Stacy Lynn ; Tyack, Peter L. / Marine Mammal Behavioral Response Studies in Southern California: Advances in Technology and Experimental Methods. In: Marine Technology Society Journal. 2012 ; Vol. 46, No. 4. pp. 48-59.

Bibtex - Download

@article{cd76d89f98364ad4b2afa49794cb6a8a,
title = "Marine Mammal Behavioral Response Studies in Southern California: Advances in Technology and Experimental Methods",
abstract = "Behavioral response studies (BRS) are increasingly being conducted to better understand basic behavioral patterns in marine animals and how underwater sounds, including from human sources, can affect them. These studies are being enabled and enhanced by advances in both acoustic sensing and transmission technologies. In the design of a 5-year project in southern California ({"}SOCAL-BRS{"}), the development of a compact, hand-deployable, ship-powered, 15-element vertical line array sound source enabled a fundamental change in overall project configuration from earlier efforts. The reduced size and power requirements of the sound source, which achieved relatively high output levels and directivity characteristics specified in the experimental design, enabled the use of substantially smaller research vessels. This size reduction favored a decentralization of field effort, with greater emphasis on mobile small boat operations capable of covering large areas to locate and tag marine mammals. These changes in configuration directly contributed to significant increases in tagging focal animals and conducting sound exposure experiments. During field experiments, received sound levels on tagged animals of several different species were within specified target ranges, demonstrating the efficacy of these new solutions to challenging field research problems.",
keywords = "transducer, marine mammals, behavioral response study, underwater sound, BEAKED-WHALES, noise",
author = "Southall, {Brandon L.} and David Moretti and Bruce Abraham and John Calambokidis and {De Ruiter}, {Stacy Lynn} and Tyack, {Peter L.}",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "48--59",
journal = "Marine Technology Society Journal",
issn = "0025-3324",
publisher = "Marine Technology Society Inc.",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Marine Mammal Behavioral Response Studies in Southern California: Advances in Technology and Experimental Methods

AU - Southall, Brandon L.

AU - Moretti, David

AU - Abraham, Bruce

AU - Calambokidis, John

AU - De Ruiter, Stacy Lynn

AU - Tyack, Peter L.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Behavioral response studies (BRS) are increasingly being conducted to better understand basic behavioral patterns in marine animals and how underwater sounds, including from human sources, can affect them. These studies are being enabled and enhanced by advances in both acoustic sensing and transmission technologies. In the design of a 5-year project in southern California ("SOCAL-BRS"), the development of a compact, hand-deployable, ship-powered, 15-element vertical line array sound source enabled a fundamental change in overall project configuration from earlier efforts. The reduced size and power requirements of the sound source, which achieved relatively high output levels and directivity characteristics specified in the experimental design, enabled the use of substantially smaller research vessels. This size reduction favored a decentralization of field effort, with greater emphasis on mobile small boat operations capable of covering large areas to locate and tag marine mammals. These changes in configuration directly contributed to significant increases in tagging focal animals and conducting sound exposure experiments. During field experiments, received sound levels on tagged animals of several different species were within specified target ranges, demonstrating the efficacy of these new solutions to challenging field research problems.

AB - Behavioral response studies (BRS) are increasingly being conducted to better understand basic behavioral patterns in marine animals and how underwater sounds, including from human sources, can affect them. These studies are being enabled and enhanced by advances in both acoustic sensing and transmission technologies. In the design of a 5-year project in southern California ("SOCAL-BRS"), the development of a compact, hand-deployable, ship-powered, 15-element vertical line array sound source enabled a fundamental change in overall project configuration from earlier efforts. The reduced size and power requirements of the sound source, which achieved relatively high output levels and directivity characteristics specified in the experimental design, enabled the use of substantially smaller research vessels. This size reduction favored a decentralization of field effort, with greater emphasis on mobile small boat operations capable of covering large areas to locate and tag marine mammals. These changes in configuration directly contributed to significant increases in tagging focal animals and conducting sound exposure experiments. During field experiments, received sound levels on tagged animals of several different species were within specified target ranges, demonstrating the efficacy of these new solutions to challenging field research problems.

KW - transducer

KW - marine mammals

KW - behavioral response study

KW - underwater sound

KW - BEAKED-WHALES

KW - noise

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 48

EP - 59

JO - Marine Technology Society Journal

JF - Marine Technology Society Journal

SN - 0025-3324

IS - 4

ER -

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