Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Marine mammals trace anthropogenic structures at sea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

On land, species from all trophic levels have adapted to fill vacant niches in environments heavily modified by humans (e.g. [1]). In the marine environment, ocean infrastructure has led to artificial reefs, resulting in localized increases in fish and crustacean density [2]. Whether marine apex predators exhibit behavioural adaptations to utilise such a scattered potential resource is unknown. Using high resolution GPS data we show how infrastructure, including wind turbines and pipelines, shapes the movements of individuals from two seal species (Phoca vitulina and Halichoerus grypus). Using state-space models, we infer that these animals are using structures to forage. We highlight the ecological consequences of such behaviour, at a time of unprecedented developments in marine infrastructure.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)R638-R639
Number of pages2
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume24
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jul 2014

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Harbour seals avoid tidal turbine noise: implications for collision risk

    Hastie, G. D., Russell, D. J. F., Lepper, P., Elliott, J., Wilson, B., Benjamins, S. & Thompson, D., Mar 2018, In : Journal of Applied Ecology. 55, 2, p. 684-693 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Related by journal

  1. Bonobos prefer individuals that hinder others over those that help

    Krupenye, C. & Hare, B., 22 Jan 2018, In : Current Biology. 28, 2, p. 280-286 e5.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Chimpanzees consider humans' psychological states when drawing statistical inferences

    Eckert, J., Rakoczy, H., Call, J., Herrmann, E. & Hanus, D., 18 Jun 2018, In : Current Biology. 28, 5 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Control of Xenopus tadpole locomotion via selective expression of Ih in excitatory interneurons

    Picton, L. D., Sillar, K. T. & Zhang, H-Y., 17 Dec 2018, In : Current Biology. 28, 24, p. 3911-3923 16 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Corvid technologies: how do New Caledonian crows get their tool designs?

    Rutz, C., Hunt, G. & St Clair, J., 24 Sep 2018, In : Current Biology. 28, 8, p. R1109-R1111 3 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

  5. Genome biology: unconventional DNA repair in an extreme genome

    Ferrier, D. E. K. & Sogabe, S., 22 Oct 2018, In : Current Biology. 28, 20, p. R1208-R1210

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Related by journal

  1. Current Biology (Journal)

    Kate Arnold (Reviewer)
    2007 → …

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  2. Current Biology (Journal)

    Richard William Byrne (Member of editorial board)
    20052014

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesEditor of research journal

ID: 118393993