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Metapopulation consequences of site fidelity for colonially breeding mammals and birds

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Metapopulation consequences of site fidelity for colonially breeding mammals and birds. / Matthiopoulos, Jason; Harwood, John; Thomas, Len.

In: Journal of Animal Ecology, Vol. 74, No. 4, 07.2005, p. 716-727.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Matthiopoulos, J, Harwood, J & Thomas, L 2005, 'Metapopulation consequences of site fidelity for colonially breeding mammals and birds' Journal of Animal Ecology, vol. 74, no. 4, pp. 716-727. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00970.x

APA

Matthiopoulos, J., Harwood, J., & Thomas, L. (2005). Metapopulation consequences of site fidelity for colonially breeding mammals and birds. Journal of Animal Ecology, 74(4), 716-727. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00970.x

Vancouver

Matthiopoulos J, Harwood J, Thomas L. Metapopulation consequences of site fidelity for colonially breeding mammals and birds. Journal of Animal Ecology. 2005 Jul;74(4):716-727. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00970.x

Author

Matthiopoulos, Jason ; Harwood, John ; Thomas, Len. / Metapopulation consequences of site fidelity for colonially breeding mammals and birds. In: Journal of Animal Ecology. 2005 ; Vol. 74, No. 4. pp. 716-727.

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@article{a9d10b44c8c2416abf87be167fb95022,
title = "Metapopulation consequences of site fidelity for colonially breeding mammals and birds",
abstract = "1. Many far-ranging bird and mammal species aggregate in colonies to breed, and most individuals remain faithful to one colony. Here, we use modelling to explore the consequences of this site fidelity for the metapopulation dynamics of such species.2. We develop a spatially explicit model of the annual transfer process between colonies. We apply it to different spatial arrangements of 20 identical colonies and thus demonstrate that connectivity alone can, in the short term, give rise to heterogeneity in colony size.3. We place the annual transfer model within a state-structured population model and examine the consequences of local and global density dependence for long-term dynamics. For each scenario, we investigate the implications of the strength of site fidelity, the cost of migration and the population's intrinsic growth rate.4. Our results suggest that, under local density dependence, site fidelity slows down the colonization process and can temporarily trap the entire population in a subset of the available potential colonies. When site fidelity is strong, the metapopulation follows a step-like trajectory. Population growth occurs only rarely because individuals must overcome their site-fidelity to found new colonies. Even though this effect is temporary, it renders the entire metapopulation vulnerable to rare catastrophic collapses.5. Under global density dependence, site fidelity imposes competition between colonies for the limiting resource. Stochastic events lead to the dominance of certain colonies and the temporary extinction of others. If site fidelity is strong, it can permanently prevent the metapopulation from occupying all available potential colonies.6. We conclude that, irrespective of the mechanism of population regulation, colonially breeding species that show strong site fidelity are likely to occupy only a portion of the breeding habitat available to them.",
keywords = "apparent carrying capacity, breeding habitat, natal dispersal, philopatry, prospecting, NATAL DISPERSAL, DENSITY-DEPENDENCE, URIA-AALGE, GREY SEALS, POPULATION REGULATION, DYNAMICS, PATTERNS, SEABIRD, COLONY, PHILOPATRY",
author = "Jason Matthiopoulos and John Harwood and Len Thomas",
year = "2005",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00970.x",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "716--727",
journal = "Journal of Animal Ecology",
issn = "0021-8790",
publisher = "Blackwell Science Ltd",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metapopulation consequences of site fidelity for colonially breeding mammals and birds

AU - Matthiopoulos, Jason

AU - Harwood, John

AU - Thomas, Len

PY - 2005/7

Y1 - 2005/7

N2 - 1. Many far-ranging bird and mammal species aggregate in colonies to breed, and most individuals remain faithful to one colony. Here, we use modelling to explore the consequences of this site fidelity for the metapopulation dynamics of such species.2. We develop a spatially explicit model of the annual transfer process between colonies. We apply it to different spatial arrangements of 20 identical colonies and thus demonstrate that connectivity alone can, in the short term, give rise to heterogeneity in colony size.3. We place the annual transfer model within a state-structured population model and examine the consequences of local and global density dependence for long-term dynamics. For each scenario, we investigate the implications of the strength of site fidelity, the cost of migration and the population's intrinsic growth rate.4. Our results suggest that, under local density dependence, site fidelity slows down the colonization process and can temporarily trap the entire population in a subset of the available potential colonies. When site fidelity is strong, the metapopulation follows a step-like trajectory. Population growth occurs only rarely because individuals must overcome their site-fidelity to found new colonies. Even though this effect is temporary, it renders the entire metapopulation vulnerable to rare catastrophic collapses.5. Under global density dependence, site fidelity imposes competition between colonies for the limiting resource. Stochastic events lead to the dominance of certain colonies and the temporary extinction of others. If site fidelity is strong, it can permanently prevent the metapopulation from occupying all available potential colonies.6. We conclude that, irrespective of the mechanism of population regulation, colonially breeding species that show strong site fidelity are likely to occupy only a portion of the breeding habitat available to them.

AB - 1. Many far-ranging bird and mammal species aggregate in colonies to breed, and most individuals remain faithful to one colony. Here, we use modelling to explore the consequences of this site fidelity for the metapopulation dynamics of such species.2. We develop a spatially explicit model of the annual transfer process between colonies. We apply it to different spatial arrangements of 20 identical colonies and thus demonstrate that connectivity alone can, in the short term, give rise to heterogeneity in colony size.3. We place the annual transfer model within a state-structured population model and examine the consequences of local and global density dependence for long-term dynamics. For each scenario, we investigate the implications of the strength of site fidelity, the cost of migration and the population's intrinsic growth rate.4. Our results suggest that, under local density dependence, site fidelity slows down the colonization process and can temporarily trap the entire population in a subset of the available potential colonies. When site fidelity is strong, the metapopulation follows a step-like trajectory. Population growth occurs only rarely because individuals must overcome their site-fidelity to found new colonies. Even though this effect is temporary, it renders the entire metapopulation vulnerable to rare catastrophic collapses.5. Under global density dependence, site fidelity imposes competition between colonies for the limiting resource. Stochastic events lead to the dominance of certain colonies and the temporary extinction of others. If site fidelity is strong, it can permanently prevent the metapopulation from occupying all available potential colonies.6. We conclude that, irrespective of the mechanism of population regulation, colonially breeding species that show strong site fidelity are likely to occupy only a portion of the breeding habitat available to them.

KW - apparent carrying capacity

KW - breeding habitat

KW - natal dispersal

KW - philopatry

KW - prospecting

KW - NATAL DISPERSAL

KW - DENSITY-DEPENDENCE

KW - URIA-AALGE

KW - GREY SEALS

KW - POPULATION REGULATION

KW - DYNAMICS

KW - PATTERNS

KW - SEABIRD

KW - COLONY

KW - PHILOPATRY

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=27644552211&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00970.x

U2 - 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00970.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1365-2656.2005.00970.x

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 716

EP - 727

JO - Journal of Animal Ecology

T2 - Journal of Animal Ecology

JF - Journal of Animal Ecology

SN - 0021-8790

IS - 4

ER -

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ID: 322861