Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Micro-geographic risk factors for malarial infection

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

Ward P. Myers, Andrea P. Myers, Janet Cox Singh, Hui C. Lau, Benny Mokuai, Richard Malley

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Background: Knowledge of geography is integral to the study of insect-borne infectious disease such as malaria. This study was designed to evaluate whether geographic parameters are associated with malarial infection in the East Sepik province of Papua New Guinea (PNG), a remote area where malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality.

Methods: A global positioning system (GPS) unit was used at each village to collect elevation, latitude and longitude data. Concurrently, a sketch map of each village was generated and the villages were sub-divided into regions of roughly equal populations. Blood samples were taken from subjects in each region using filter paper collection. The samples were later processed using nested PCR for qualitative determination of malarial infection. The area was mapped using the GPS-information and overlaid with prevalence data. Data tables were examined using traditional chi square statistical techniques. A logistic regression analysis was then used to determine the significance of geographic risk factors including, elevation, distance from administrative centre and village of residence.

Results: Three hundred and thirty-two samples were included (24% of the total estimated population). Ninety-six were positive, yielding a prevalence of 29%. Chi square testing within each village found a non-random distribution of cases across sub-regions (p < 0.05). Multivariate logistic regression techniques suggested malarial infection changed with elevation (OR = 0.64 per 10 m, p < 0.05) and distance from administrative centre (OR = 1.3 per 100 m, p < 0.05).

Conclusion: These results suggest that malarial infection is significantly and independently associated with lower elevation and greater distance from administrative centre in a rural area in PNG. This type of analysis can provide information that may be used to target specific areas in developing countries for malaria prevention and treatment.

Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Article number27
Number of pages8
JournalMalaria Journal
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Feb 2009

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by author

  1. Plasmodium knowlesi: experimental model, zoonotic pathogen and golden opportunity?

    Cox-Singh, J., Jan 2018, In : Parasitology. 145, 1, p. 1-5 4 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

  2. Human infections with Plasmodium knowlesi - zoonotic malaria

    Millar, S. B. & Cox Singh, J., Jul 2015, In : Clinical Microbiology and Infection. 21, 7, p. 640-648

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Plasmodium knowlesi: from severe zoonosis to animal model

    Cox Singh, J. & Culleton, R., Jun 2015, In : Trends in Parasitology. 31, 6

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Plasmodium knowlesi genome sequences from clinical isolates reveal extensive genomic dimorphism

    Monsanto Pinheiro, M., Ahmed, M. A., Millar, S. B., Sanderson, T., Otto, T. D., Lu, W. C., Krishna, S., Rayner, J. C. & Cox-Singh, J., 1 Apr 2015, In : PLoS One. 10, 4, 16 p., e0121303.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. Plasmodium knowlesi – an emerging pathogen

    Ahmed, M. A. & Cox Singh, J., Apr 2015, In : ISBT Science Series. 10, S1, p. 134-140

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Related by journal

  1. The acquisition of long-lived memory B cell responses to merozoite surface protein-8 in individuals with Plasmodium vivax infection

    Kochayoo, P., Kittisenachai, N., Changrob, S., Wangriatisak, K., Muh, F., Chootong, P. & Han, E-T., 31 May 2019, In : Malaria Journal. 18, 10 p., 188.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Diversity pattern of Duffy binding protein sequence among Duffy-negatives and Duffy-positives in Sudan

    Hoque, M. R., Elfaki, M. M. A., Ahmed, M. A., Lee, S-K., Muh, F., Albsheer, M. M. A., Hamid, M. M. A. & Han, E-T., 17 Aug 2018, In : Malaria Journal. 17, 10 p., 297.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Estimation on local transmission of malaria by serological approach under low transmission setting in Myanmar

    Nyunt, M. H., Soe, T. N., Shein, T., Zaw, N. N., Han, S. S., Muh, F., Lee, S-K., Han, J-H., Park, J-H., Ha, K-S., Park, W. S., Hong, S-H., Kyaw, M. P. & Han, E-T., 5 Jan 2018, In : Malaria Journal. 17, 9 p., 6.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  4. Genetic diversity and natural selection of Plasmodium knowlesi merozoite surface protein 1 paralog gene in Malaysia

    Ahmed, M. A., Fauzi, M. & Han, E-T., 14 Mar 2018, In : Malaria Journal. 17, 11 p., 115.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  5. In vitro invasion inhibition assay using antibodies against Plasmodium knowlesi Duffy binding protein alpha and apical membrane antigen protein 1 in human erythrocyte-adapted P. knowlesi A1-H.1 strain

    Muh, F., Lee, S-K., Hoque, M. R., Han, J-H., Park, J-H., Firdaus, E. R., Moon, R. W., Lau, Y. L. & Han, E-T., 27 Jul 2018, In : Malaria Journal. 17, 11 p., 272.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 23166072