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Military application of mechanical CPR devices: a pressing requirement?

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Author(s)

Iain T. Parsons, A. T. Cox, Paul Rees

School/Research organisations

Abstract

Maintaining high-quality chest compressions during cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiac arrest presents a challenge. The currently available mechanical CPR (mCPR) devices are described in this review, coupled with an analysis of the evidence pertaining to their efficacy. Overall, mCPR appears to be at least equivalent to high-quality manual CPR in large trials. There is potential utility for mCPR devices in the military context to ensure uninterrupted quality CPR following a medical cardiac arrest. Particular utility may be in a prohibitive operational environment, where manpower is limited or where timelines to definitive care are stretched resulting in a requirement for prolonged resuscitation. mCPR can also act as a bridge to advanced endovascular resuscitation techniques should they become more mainstream therapy.
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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)438-441
JournalJournal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
Volume164
Issue number6
Early online date6 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

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