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Misperceptions of opposite-sex preferences for thinness and muscularity

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Misperceptions of opposite-sex preferences for thinness and muscularity. / Perrett, David I.; Lei, Xue.

In: British Journal of Psychology, Vol. 112, No. 1, 02.2021, p. 247-264.

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Perrett, DI & Lei, X 2021, 'Misperceptions of opposite-sex preferences for thinness and muscularity', British Journal of Psychology, vol. 112, no. 1, pp. 247-264. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12451

APA

Perrett, D. I., & Lei, X. (2021). Misperceptions of opposite-sex preferences for thinness and muscularity. British Journal of Psychology, 112(1), 247-264. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12451

Vancouver

Perrett DI, Lei X. Misperceptions of opposite-sex preferences for thinness and muscularity. British Journal of Psychology. 2021 Feb;112(1):247-264. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12451

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Perrett, David I. ; Lei, Xue. / Misperceptions of opposite-sex preferences for thinness and muscularity. In: British Journal of Psychology. 2021 ; Vol. 112, No. 1. pp. 247-264.

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@article{0ec460bc46b14c519fc800801cf422d2,
title = "Misperceptions of opposite-sex preferences for thinness and muscularity",
abstract = "Thin and muscular have been characterized as ideals for women and men, respectively. Little research has investigated whether men and women have accurate perceptions of opposite‐sex preferences of thinness and muscularity. Further, no study has explored whether opposite‐sex perceptions of thinness and muscularity preferences differ for short‐term and long‐term relationships. The present study set out to address these questions. We used interactive 3D human models to represent bodies varying in size (body mass index/BMI weight scaled by height) and body composition. University‐aged (18–31) White European heterosexual men and women were asked to choose their own and ideal body shape, the ideal body shape for a short‐ and a long‐term partner, and the body shape they thought the opposite‐sex would most like for short‐ and long‐term partners. Women overestimated the thinness that men prefer in a partner and men overestimated the heaviness and muscularity that women prefer in a partner. These misperceptions were more exaggerated for short‐term relationships than for long‐term relationships. The results illustrate the importance of investigating misperceptions of opposite‐sex preferences and raise the possibility that correcting misperceptions might have utility in reducing body dissatisfaction or eating disorders.",
keywords = "Attractiveness, Body size, Misperception, Muscularity, Preferences",
author = "Perrett, {David I.} and Xue Lei",
note = "The data that support the findings of this study will be openly available in Mendeley Data at http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/769zgnsm9w.1 following an embargo from 2020-08-09.",
year = "2021",
month = feb,
doi = "10.1111/bjop.12451",
language = "English",
volume = "112",
pages = "247--264",
journal = "British Journal of Psychology",
issn = "0007-1269",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Misperceptions of opposite-sex preferences for thinness and muscularity

AU - Perrett, David I.

AU - Lei, Xue

N1 - The data that support the findings of this study will be openly available in Mendeley Data at http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/769zgnsm9w.1 following an embargo from 2020-08-09.

PY - 2021/2

Y1 - 2021/2

N2 - Thin and muscular have been characterized as ideals for women and men, respectively. Little research has investigated whether men and women have accurate perceptions of opposite‐sex preferences of thinness and muscularity. Further, no study has explored whether opposite‐sex perceptions of thinness and muscularity preferences differ for short‐term and long‐term relationships. The present study set out to address these questions. We used interactive 3D human models to represent bodies varying in size (body mass index/BMI weight scaled by height) and body composition. University‐aged (18–31) White European heterosexual men and women were asked to choose their own and ideal body shape, the ideal body shape for a short‐ and a long‐term partner, and the body shape they thought the opposite‐sex would most like for short‐ and long‐term partners. Women overestimated the thinness that men prefer in a partner and men overestimated the heaviness and muscularity that women prefer in a partner. These misperceptions were more exaggerated for short‐term relationships than for long‐term relationships. The results illustrate the importance of investigating misperceptions of opposite‐sex preferences and raise the possibility that correcting misperceptions might have utility in reducing body dissatisfaction or eating disorders.

AB - Thin and muscular have been characterized as ideals for women and men, respectively. Little research has investigated whether men and women have accurate perceptions of opposite‐sex preferences of thinness and muscularity. Further, no study has explored whether opposite‐sex perceptions of thinness and muscularity preferences differ for short‐term and long‐term relationships. The present study set out to address these questions. We used interactive 3D human models to represent bodies varying in size (body mass index/BMI weight scaled by height) and body composition. University‐aged (18–31) White European heterosexual men and women were asked to choose their own and ideal body shape, the ideal body shape for a short‐ and a long‐term partner, and the body shape they thought the opposite‐sex would most like for short‐ and long‐term partners. Women overestimated the thinness that men prefer in a partner and men overestimated the heaviness and muscularity that women prefer in a partner. These misperceptions were more exaggerated for short‐term relationships than for long‐term relationships. The results illustrate the importance of investigating misperceptions of opposite‐sex preferences and raise the possibility that correcting misperceptions might have utility in reducing body dissatisfaction or eating disorders.

KW - Attractiveness

KW - Body size

KW - Misperception

KW - Muscularity

KW - Preferences

U2 - 10.1111/bjop.12451

DO - 10.1111/bjop.12451

M3 - Article

VL - 112

SP - 247

EP - 264

JO - British Journal of Psychology

JF - British Journal of Psychology

SN - 0007-1269

IS - 1

ER -

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