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Motor limitation in dual-task processing under ballistic movement conditions.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Author(s)

R Ulrich, S Ruiz Fernandez, Ines Jentzsch, B Rolke, H Schroeter, H Leuthold

School/Research organisations

Abstract

The standard bottleneck model of the psychological refractory period (PRP) assumes that the selection of the second response is postponed until the first response has been selected. Accordingly, dual-task interference is attributed to a single central-processing bottleneck involving decision and response selection, but not the execution of the response itself. In order to critically examine the assumption that response execution is not part of this bottleneck, we systematically manipulated the temporal demand for executing the first response in a classical PRP paradigm. Contrary to the assumption of the standard bottleneck model, this manipulation affected the reaction time for Task 2. Specifically, reaction time for Task 2 increased with execution time for Task 1. This carryover effect from Task 1 to Task 2 provides evidence for the notion that response execution can be part of the processing bottleneck.

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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)788-793
Number of pages6
JournalPsychological Science
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006

    Research areas

  • PSYCHOLOGICAL REFRACTORY-PERIOD, MULTIPLE BOTTLENECKS, CENTRAL POSTPONEMENT, OVERLAPPING TASKS, INTERFERENCE, PERFORMANCE, MODEL

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