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Multiple oscillations in Neoarchaean atmospheric chemistry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Multiple oscillations in Neoarchaean atmospheric chemistry. / Izon, Gareth; Zerkle, Aubrey Lea; Zhelezinskaia, Iadviga; Farquhar, James; Newton, Robert J.; Poulton, Simon W.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Claire, Mark.

In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 431, 01.12.2015, p. 264-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Izon, G, Zerkle, AL, Zhelezinskaia, I, Farquhar, J, Newton, RJ, Poulton, SW, Eigenbrode, JL & Claire, M 2015, 'Multiple oscillations in Neoarchaean atmospheric chemistry', Earth and Planetary Science Letters, vol. 431, pp. 264-273. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2015.09.018

APA

Izon, G., Zerkle, A. L., Zhelezinskaia, I., Farquhar, J., Newton, R. J., Poulton, S. W., Eigenbrode, J. L., & Claire, M. (2015). Multiple oscillations in Neoarchaean atmospheric chemistry. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 431, 264-273. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2015.09.018

Vancouver

Izon G, Zerkle AL, Zhelezinskaia I, Farquhar J, Newton RJ, Poulton SW et al. Multiple oscillations in Neoarchaean atmospheric chemistry. Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 2015 Dec 1;431:264-273. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2015.09.018

Author

Izon, Gareth ; Zerkle, Aubrey Lea ; Zhelezinskaia, Iadviga ; Farquhar, James ; Newton, Robert J. ; Poulton, Simon W. ; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L. ; Claire, Mark. / Multiple oscillations in Neoarchaean atmospheric chemistry. In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 2015 ; Vol. 431. pp. 264-273.

Bibtex - Download

@article{dee8e52a0b054767881e79157abe8b4e,
title = "Multiple oscillations in Neoarchaean atmospheric chemistry",
abstract = "The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) represents a crucial juncture in Earth history, signifying the rise in atmospheric oxygen from parts per million to per cent levels at ~2.45-2.32 billion-years-ago (Ga). Although planetary oxygenation undoubtedly led to the inception of the contemporary Earth system, the trigger(s) and mechanism(s) controlling this chemical reorganisation remain elusive. Quantitative estimates of the atmosphere's composition in the prelude to the GOE are central to understanding this oxygenation event. Previous analyses of 2.65-2.5 Ga sediments from the Griqualand Basin (South Africa) invoke a tantalising picture of an unusual Earth environment, alluding to an atmosphere periodically dominated by a layer of organic particles ({"}haze{"}) formed from methane photolysis. However, as yet this hypothesis has remained untested. Here we present four new coupled carbon and quadruple sulphur isotope records from distal, time equivalent (2.7-2.5 Ga), sedimentary successions from South Africa and Western Australia. These extended records reveal similar chemostratigraphic trends, supporting a dynamic terminal-Neoarchaean atmosphere, oscillating between a hazy state at elevated methane concentrations, and a haze-free anoxic background state. We suggest these atmospheric aberrations were related to heightened biogenic methane fluxes fuelled by enhanced nutrient delivery from climatically or weathering induced feedbacks. These data question the canonical view of a simple, unidirectional planetary oxygenation and signify that the overture to the GOE was governed by complex feedbacks within the Earth-biosphere system.",
keywords = "Neoarchaean, Multiple sulphur isotopes, MIF, Methane, Hydrocarbon haze, Atmospheric oxygen",
author = "Gareth Izon and Zerkle, {Aubrey Lea} and Iadviga Zhelezinskaia and James Farquhar and Newton, {Robert J.} and Poulton, {Simon W.} and Eigenbrode, {Jennifer L.} and Mark Claire",
note = "This study was supported financially by NERC Fellowship NE/H016805/2 (to AZ) and a NERC Standard Grant NE/J023485/2 (to AZ, MC and SP). ",
year = "2015",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.epsl.2015.09.018",
language = "English",
volume = "431",
pages = "264--273",
journal = "Earth and Planetary Science Letters",
issn = "0012-821X",
publisher = "Elsevier Science BV",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Multiple oscillations in Neoarchaean atmospheric chemistry

AU - Izon, Gareth

AU - Zerkle, Aubrey Lea

AU - Zhelezinskaia, Iadviga

AU - Farquhar, James

AU - Newton, Robert J.

AU - Poulton, Simon W.

AU - Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.

AU - Claire, Mark

N1 - This study was supported financially by NERC Fellowship NE/H016805/2 (to AZ) and a NERC Standard Grant NE/J023485/2 (to AZ, MC and SP).

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) represents a crucial juncture in Earth history, signifying the rise in atmospheric oxygen from parts per million to per cent levels at ~2.45-2.32 billion-years-ago (Ga). Although planetary oxygenation undoubtedly led to the inception of the contemporary Earth system, the trigger(s) and mechanism(s) controlling this chemical reorganisation remain elusive. Quantitative estimates of the atmosphere's composition in the prelude to the GOE are central to understanding this oxygenation event. Previous analyses of 2.65-2.5 Ga sediments from the Griqualand Basin (South Africa) invoke a tantalising picture of an unusual Earth environment, alluding to an atmosphere periodically dominated by a layer of organic particles ("haze") formed from methane photolysis. However, as yet this hypothesis has remained untested. Here we present four new coupled carbon and quadruple sulphur isotope records from distal, time equivalent (2.7-2.5 Ga), sedimentary successions from South Africa and Western Australia. These extended records reveal similar chemostratigraphic trends, supporting a dynamic terminal-Neoarchaean atmosphere, oscillating between a hazy state at elevated methane concentrations, and a haze-free anoxic background state. We suggest these atmospheric aberrations were related to heightened biogenic methane fluxes fuelled by enhanced nutrient delivery from climatically or weathering induced feedbacks. These data question the canonical view of a simple, unidirectional planetary oxygenation and signify that the overture to the GOE was governed by complex feedbacks within the Earth-biosphere system.

AB - The Great Oxidation Event (GOE) represents a crucial juncture in Earth history, signifying the rise in atmospheric oxygen from parts per million to per cent levels at ~2.45-2.32 billion-years-ago (Ga). Although planetary oxygenation undoubtedly led to the inception of the contemporary Earth system, the trigger(s) and mechanism(s) controlling this chemical reorganisation remain elusive. Quantitative estimates of the atmosphere's composition in the prelude to the GOE are central to understanding this oxygenation event. Previous analyses of 2.65-2.5 Ga sediments from the Griqualand Basin (South Africa) invoke a tantalising picture of an unusual Earth environment, alluding to an atmosphere periodically dominated by a layer of organic particles ("haze") formed from methane photolysis. However, as yet this hypothesis has remained untested. Here we present four new coupled carbon and quadruple sulphur isotope records from distal, time equivalent (2.7-2.5 Ga), sedimentary successions from South Africa and Western Australia. These extended records reveal similar chemostratigraphic trends, supporting a dynamic terminal-Neoarchaean atmosphere, oscillating between a hazy state at elevated methane concentrations, and a haze-free anoxic background state. We suggest these atmospheric aberrations were related to heightened biogenic methane fluxes fuelled by enhanced nutrient delivery from climatically or weathering induced feedbacks. These data question the canonical view of a simple, unidirectional planetary oxygenation and signify that the overture to the GOE was governed by complex feedbacks within the Earth-biosphere system.

KW - Neoarchaean

KW - Multiple sulphur isotopes

KW - MIF

KW - Methane

KW - Hydrocarbon haze

KW - Atmospheric oxygen

UR - https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0012821X15005853#se0140

U2 - 10.1016/j.epsl.2015.09.018

DO - 10.1016/j.epsl.2015.09.018

M3 - Article

VL - 431

SP - 264

EP - 273

JO - Earth and Planetary Science Letters

JF - Earth and Planetary Science Letters

SN - 0012-821X

ER -

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