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Myotube production in fast myotomal muscle is switched-off at shorter body lengths in male than female Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus (L.) resulting in a lower final fibre number

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Myotube production in fast myotomal muscle is switched-off at shorter body lengths in male than female Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus (L.) resulting in a lower final fibre number. / Hagen, O.; Vieira-Johnston, Vera Lucia Almeida; Solberg, C.; Johnston, I. A.

In: Journal of Fish Biology, Vol. 73, No. 1, 07.2008, p. 139-152.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Hagen, O, Vieira-Johnston, VLA, Solberg, C & Johnston, IA 2008, 'Myotube production in fast myotomal muscle is switched-off at shorter body lengths in male than female Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus (L.) resulting in a lower final fibre number', Journal of Fish Biology, vol. 73, no. 1, pp. 139-152. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2008.01917.x

APA

Hagen, O., Vieira-Johnston, V. L. A., Solberg, C., & Johnston, I. A. (2008). Myotube production in fast myotomal muscle is switched-off at shorter body lengths in male than female Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus (L.) resulting in a lower final fibre number. Journal of Fish Biology, 73(1), 139-152. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2008.01917.x

Vancouver

Hagen O, Vieira-Johnston VLA, Solberg C, Johnston IA. Myotube production in fast myotomal muscle is switched-off at shorter body lengths in male than female Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus (L.) resulting in a lower final fibre number. Journal of Fish Biology. 2008 Jul;73(1):139-152. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2008.01917.x

Author

Hagen, O. ; Vieira-Johnston, Vera Lucia Almeida ; Solberg, C. ; Johnston, I. A. / Myotube production in fast myotomal muscle is switched-off at shorter body lengths in male than female Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus (L.) resulting in a lower final fibre number. In: Journal of Fish Biology. 2008 ; Vol. 73, No. 1. pp. 139-152.

Bibtex - Download

@article{d15252575eeb4622878bbc1caf84e346,
title = "Myotube production in fast myotomal muscle is switched-off at shorter body lengths in male than female Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus (L.) resulting in a lower final fibre number",
abstract = "A sampling method is described to determine accurately the number of fast myotomal muscle fibres (N-F) in a large flatfish species, the Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus. An unusual feature of the fast myotomal muscle is the presence of internalized strips of slow muscle fibres. In fish of 1.5-3.5 kg (n = 24), the total cross-sectional area (A(TC)) of fast muscle was 18% greater in the dorsal than ventral myotomal compartments (P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between left- and right-hand sides of the body. Due the bilateral asymmetry, muscle blocks (5 x 5 x 5 mm) were prepared to systematically sample each myotomal quadrant (dorsal, ventral, left- and right-side) and the diameters of 150 fast fibres measured per block. Smooth non-parametric probability functions were fitted to a minimum of 800 measurements of fibre diameter per quadrant (n = 5). There were no significant differences in the distribution of muscle fibre diameters between myotomal compartments and therefore N-F could be estimated from a single quadrant. The number of blocks required to estimate N-F with a repeatability of +/- 2.5% increased from six at 300 g body mass to 17 at 96.5 kg, caused by variation within and between blocks. Gompertz curves were fitted to measurements of fibre number and fork length (L-F). The estimated final fibre number was 8.96 x 10(5) (7.99-9.94 x 10(5), 95% CI) for males and 1.73 x 10(6) (1.56-1.90 x 10(6), 95% CI) for female fish. The estimated L-F for cessation of fibre recruitment in the fast muscle of female fish (1775 mm) was almost twice that in males (810 mm), reflecting their greater ultimate body size. (c) 2008 The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2008 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.",
keywords = "maximum fibre number, muscle fibre recruitment, muscle fibre types, muscle growth, TROUT SALMO-GAIRDNERI, SEXUAL-DIMORPHISM, SWIMMING MUSCLES, DEVELOPMENTAL-CHANGES, MYOSIN ISOFORMS, CLUPEA-HARENGUS, GROWTH DYNAMICS, LATERAL MUSCLE, SOMATIC GROWTH, EYE MIGRATION",
author = "O. Hagen and Vieira-Johnston, {Vera Lucia Almeida} and C. Solberg and Johnston, {I. A.}",
year = "2008",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1111/j.1095-8649.2008.01917.x",
language = "English",
volume = "73",
pages = "139--152",
journal = "Journal of Fish Biology",
issn = "0022-1112",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111)",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Myotube production in fast myotomal muscle is switched-off at shorter body lengths in male than female Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus (L.) resulting in a lower final fibre number

AU - Hagen, O.

AU - Vieira-Johnston, Vera Lucia Almeida

AU - Solberg, C.

AU - Johnston, I. A.

PY - 2008/7

Y1 - 2008/7

N2 - A sampling method is described to determine accurately the number of fast myotomal muscle fibres (N-F) in a large flatfish species, the Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus. An unusual feature of the fast myotomal muscle is the presence of internalized strips of slow muscle fibres. In fish of 1.5-3.5 kg (n = 24), the total cross-sectional area (A(TC)) of fast muscle was 18% greater in the dorsal than ventral myotomal compartments (P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between left- and right-hand sides of the body. Due the bilateral asymmetry, muscle blocks (5 x 5 x 5 mm) were prepared to systematically sample each myotomal quadrant (dorsal, ventral, left- and right-side) and the diameters of 150 fast fibres measured per block. Smooth non-parametric probability functions were fitted to a minimum of 800 measurements of fibre diameter per quadrant (n = 5). There were no significant differences in the distribution of muscle fibre diameters between myotomal compartments and therefore N-F could be estimated from a single quadrant. The number of blocks required to estimate N-F with a repeatability of +/- 2.5% increased from six at 300 g body mass to 17 at 96.5 kg, caused by variation within and between blocks. Gompertz curves were fitted to measurements of fibre number and fork length (L-F). The estimated final fibre number was 8.96 x 10(5) (7.99-9.94 x 10(5), 95% CI) for males and 1.73 x 10(6) (1.56-1.90 x 10(6), 95% CI) for female fish. The estimated L-F for cessation of fibre recruitment in the fast muscle of female fish (1775 mm) was almost twice that in males (810 mm), reflecting their greater ultimate body size. (c) 2008 The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2008 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

AB - A sampling method is described to determine accurately the number of fast myotomal muscle fibres (N-F) in a large flatfish species, the Atlantic halibut Hippoglossus hippoglossus. An unusual feature of the fast myotomal muscle is the presence of internalized strips of slow muscle fibres. In fish of 1.5-3.5 kg (n = 24), the total cross-sectional area (A(TC)) of fast muscle was 18% greater in the dorsal than ventral myotomal compartments (P < 0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between left- and right-hand sides of the body. Due the bilateral asymmetry, muscle blocks (5 x 5 x 5 mm) were prepared to systematically sample each myotomal quadrant (dorsal, ventral, left- and right-side) and the diameters of 150 fast fibres measured per block. Smooth non-parametric probability functions were fitted to a minimum of 800 measurements of fibre diameter per quadrant (n = 5). There were no significant differences in the distribution of muscle fibre diameters between myotomal compartments and therefore N-F could be estimated from a single quadrant. The number of blocks required to estimate N-F with a repeatability of +/- 2.5% increased from six at 300 g body mass to 17 at 96.5 kg, caused by variation within and between blocks. Gompertz curves were fitted to measurements of fibre number and fork length (L-F). The estimated final fibre number was 8.96 x 10(5) (7.99-9.94 x 10(5), 95% CI) for males and 1.73 x 10(6) (1.56-1.90 x 10(6), 95% CI) for female fish. The estimated L-F for cessation of fibre recruitment in the fast muscle of female fish (1775 mm) was almost twice that in males (810 mm), reflecting their greater ultimate body size. (c) 2008 The Authors Journal compilation (c) 2008 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

KW - maximum fibre number

KW - muscle fibre recruitment

KW - muscle fibre types

KW - muscle growth

KW - TROUT SALMO-GAIRDNERI

KW - SEXUAL-DIMORPHISM

KW - SWIMMING MUSCLES

KW - DEVELOPMENTAL-CHANGES

KW - MYOSIN ISOFORMS

KW - CLUPEA-HARENGUS

KW - GROWTH DYNAMICS

KW - LATERAL MUSCLE

KW - SOMATIC GROWTH

KW - EYE MIGRATION

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=46749114467&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2008.01917.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1095-8649.2008.01917.x

M3 - Article

VL - 73

SP - 139

EP - 152

JO - Journal of Fish Biology

JF - Journal of Fish Biology

SN - 0022-1112

IS - 1

ER -

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