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Naval sonar disrupts foraging behaviour in humpback whales

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Naval sonar disrupts foraging behaviour in humpback whales. / Sivle, Lise D.; Wensveen, Paulus Jacobus; Kvadsheim, Petter; Lam, Frans-Peter A.; Visser, Fleur; Cure, Charlotte; Harris, Catriona M; Tyack, Peter Lloyd; Miller, Patrick.

In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 562, 29.12.2016, p. 211-220.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Sivle, LD, Wensveen, PJ, Kvadsheim, P, Lam, F-PA, Visser, F, Cure, C, Harris, CM, Tyack, PL & Miller, P 2016, 'Naval sonar disrupts foraging behaviour in humpback whales' Marine Ecology Progress Series, vol. 562, pp. 211-220. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps11969

APA

Sivle, L. D., Wensveen, P. J., Kvadsheim, P., Lam, F-P. A., Visser, F., Cure, C., ... Miller, P. (2016). Naval sonar disrupts foraging behaviour in humpback whales. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 562, 211-220. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps11969

Vancouver

Sivle LD, Wensveen PJ, Kvadsheim P, Lam F-PA, Visser F, Cure C et al. Naval sonar disrupts foraging behaviour in humpback whales. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2016 Dec 29;562:211-220. https://doi.org/10.3354/meps11969

Author

Sivle, Lise D. ; Wensveen, Paulus Jacobus ; Kvadsheim, Petter ; Lam, Frans-Peter A. ; Visser, Fleur ; Cure, Charlotte ; Harris, Catriona M ; Tyack, Peter Lloyd ; Miller, Patrick. / Naval sonar disrupts foraging behaviour in humpback whales. In: Marine Ecology Progress Series. 2016 ; Vol. 562. pp. 211-220.

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@article{c9f7ddcf1414404bb2ba982ca3acfad9,
title = "Naval sonar disrupts foraging behaviour in humpback whales",
abstract = "Modern long-range naval sonars are a potential disturbance for marine mammals and can cause disruption of feeding in cetaceans. We examined the lunge-feeding behaviour of humpback whales Megaptera novaeangliae before, during and after controlled exposure experiments with naval sonar by use of acoustic and motion sensor archival tags attached to each animal. Lunge-feeding by humpback whales entails a strong acceleration to increase speed before engulfing a large volume of prey-laden water, which can be identified by an acoustic signature characterized by a few seconds of high-level flow-noise followed by a rapid reduction, coinciding with a peak in animal acceleration. Over 2 successive seasons, 13 humpback whales were tagged. All were subject to a no-sonar control exposure, and 12 whales were exposed to 2 consecutive sonar exposure sessions, with 1 h between sessions. The first sonar session resulted in an average 68{\%} reduction in lunge rate during exposure compared to pre-exposure, and this reduction was significantly greater than any changes observed during the no-sonar control. During the second sonar session, reduction in lunge rate was 66{\%} during sonar exposure compared to the pre-exposure level, but was not significant compared to the no-sonar control, likely due to a larger inter-individual variability because some individuals appeared to have habituated whereas others had not. Our results indicate that naval sonars operating near humpback whale feeding grounds may lead to reduced foraging and negative impacts on energy balance.",
keywords = "Humpback whale, Megaptera novaeangliae, Naval sonar, Behavioral response, Lung feeding",
author = "Sivle, {Lise D.} and Wensveen, {Paulus Jacobus} and Petter Kvadsheim and Lam, {Frans-Peter A.} and Fleur Visser and Charlotte Cure and Harris, {Catriona M} and Tyack, {Peter Lloyd} and Patrick Miller",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "29",
doi = "10.3354/meps11969",
language = "English",
volume = "562",
pages = "211--220",
journal = "Marine Ecology Progress Series",
issn = "0171-8630",
publisher = "Inter-Research",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Naval sonar disrupts foraging behaviour in humpback whales

AU - Sivle, Lise D.

AU - Wensveen, Paulus Jacobus

AU - Kvadsheim, Petter

AU - Lam, Frans-Peter A.

AU - Visser, Fleur

AU - Cure, Charlotte

AU - Harris, Catriona M

AU - Tyack, Peter Lloyd

AU - Miller, Patrick

PY - 2016/12/29

Y1 - 2016/12/29

N2 - Modern long-range naval sonars are a potential disturbance for marine mammals and can cause disruption of feeding in cetaceans. We examined the lunge-feeding behaviour of humpback whales Megaptera novaeangliae before, during and after controlled exposure experiments with naval sonar by use of acoustic and motion sensor archival tags attached to each animal. Lunge-feeding by humpback whales entails a strong acceleration to increase speed before engulfing a large volume of prey-laden water, which can be identified by an acoustic signature characterized by a few seconds of high-level flow-noise followed by a rapid reduction, coinciding with a peak in animal acceleration. Over 2 successive seasons, 13 humpback whales were tagged. All were subject to a no-sonar control exposure, and 12 whales were exposed to 2 consecutive sonar exposure sessions, with 1 h between sessions. The first sonar session resulted in an average 68% reduction in lunge rate during exposure compared to pre-exposure, and this reduction was significantly greater than any changes observed during the no-sonar control. During the second sonar session, reduction in lunge rate was 66% during sonar exposure compared to the pre-exposure level, but was not significant compared to the no-sonar control, likely due to a larger inter-individual variability because some individuals appeared to have habituated whereas others had not. Our results indicate that naval sonars operating near humpback whale feeding grounds may lead to reduced foraging and negative impacts on energy balance.

AB - Modern long-range naval sonars are a potential disturbance for marine mammals and can cause disruption of feeding in cetaceans. We examined the lunge-feeding behaviour of humpback whales Megaptera novaeangliae before, during and after controlled exposure experiments with naval sonar by use of acoustic and motion sensor archival tags attached to each animal. Lunge-feeding by humpback whales entails a strong acceleration to increase speed before engulfing a large volume of prey-laden water, which can be identified by an acoustic signature characterized by a few seconds of high-level flow-noise followed by a rapid reduction, coinciding with a peak in animal acceleration. Over 2 successive seasons, 13 humpback whales were tagged. All were subject to a no-sonar control exposure, and 12 whales were exposed to 2 consecutive sonar exposure sessions, with 1 h between sessions. The first sonar session resulted in an average 68% reduction in lunge rate during exposure compared to pre-exposure, and this reduction was significantly greater than any changes observed during the no-sonar control. During the second sonar session, reduction in lunge rate was 66% during sonar exposure compared to the pre-exposure level, but was not significant compared to the no-sonar control, likely due to a larger inter-individual variability because some individuals appeared to have habituated whereas others had not. Our results indicate that naval sonars operating near humpback whale feeding grounds may lead to reduced foraging and negative impacts on energy balance.

KW - Humpback whale

KW - Megaptera novaeangliae

KW - Naval sonar

KW - Behavioral response

KW - Lung feeding

U2 - 10.3354/meps11969

DO - 10.3354/meps11969

M3 - Article

VL - 562

SP - 211

EP - 220

JO - Marine Ecology Progress Series

T2 - Marine Ecology Progress Series

JF - Marine Ecology Progress Series

SN - 0171-8630

ER -

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ID: 230395866