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Neutral buoyancy is optimal to minimize the cost of transport in horizontally swimming seals

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Neutral buoyancy is optimal to minimize the cost of transport in horizontally swimming seals. / Sato, Katsufumi; Aoki, Kagari; Watanabe, Yuuki Y.; Miller, Patrick J. O.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 3, e2205, 16.07.2013.

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Sato, K, Aoki, K, Watanabe, YY & Miller, PJO 2013, 'Neutral buoyancy is optimal to minimize the cost of transport in horizontally swimming seals', Scientific Reports, vol. 3, e2205. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep02205

APA

Sato, K., Aoki, K., Watanabe, Y. Y., & Miller, P. J. O. (2013). Neutral buoyancy is optimal to minimize the cost of transport in horizontally swimming seals. Scientific Reports, 3, [e2205]. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep02205

Vancouver

Sato K, Aoki K, Watanabe YY, Miller PJO. Neutral buoyancy is optimal to minimize the cost of transport in horizontally swimming seals. Scientific Reports. 2013 Jul 16;3. e2205. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep02205

Author

Sato, Katsufumi ; Aoki, Kagari ; Watanabe, Yuuki Y. ; Miller, Patrick J. O. / Neutral buoyancy is optimal to minimize the cost of transport in horizontally swimming seals. In: Scientific Reports. 2013 ; Vol. 3.

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@article{6ea0964c9bc647ea910ce875359e5f84,
title = "Neutral buoyancy is optimal to minimize the cost of transport in horizontally swimming seals",
abstract = "Flying and terrestrial animals should spend energy to move while supporting their weight against gravity. On the other hand, supported by buoyancy, aquatic animals can minimize the energy cost for supporting their body weight and neutral buoyancy has been considered advantageous for aquatic animals. However, some studies suggested that aquatic animals might use non-neutral buoyancy for gliding and thereby save energy cost for locomotion. We manipulated the body density of seals using detachable weights and floats, and compared stroke efforts of horizontally swimming seals under natural conditions using animal-borne recorders. The results indicated that seals had smaller stroke efforts to swim a given speed when they were closer to neutral buoyancy. We conclude that neutral buoyancy is likely the best body density to minimize the cost of transport in horizontal swimming by seals.",
keywords = "Energetic advantages, Stroking patterns, Elephant seals, Body density, Fish, Whales, Depth, Sink",
author = "Katsufumi Sato and Kagari Aoki and Watanabe, {Yuuki Y.} and Miller, {Patrick J. O.}",
note = "This study was supported by National Environment Research Council grant NERC NE/c00311X/1, a Grant-in-Aid for Science Research from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (to K.S. and Y.Y.W.), a grant from Canon Foundation and program Bio-Logging Science of the University of Tokyo (UTBLS).",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
day = "16",
doi = "10.1038/srep02205",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature publishing group",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neutral buoyancy is optimal to minimize the cost of transport in horizontally swimming seals

AU - Sato, Katsufumi

AU - Aoki, Kagari

AU - Watanabe, Yuuki Y.

AU - Miller, Patrick J. O.

N1 - This study was supported by National Environment Research Council grant NERC NE/c00311X/1, a Grant-in-Aid for Science Research from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (to K.S. and Y.Y.W.), a grant from Canon Foundation and program Bio-Logging Science of the University of Tokyo (UTBLS).

PY - 2013/7/16

Y1 - 2013/7/16

N2 - Flying and terrestrial animals should spend energy to move while supporting their weight against gravity. On the other hand, supported by buoyancy, aquatic animals can minimize the energy cost for supporting their body weight and neutral buoyancy has been considered advantageous for aquatic animals. However, some studies suggested that aquatic animals might use non-neutral buoyancy for gliding and thereby save energy cost for locomotion. We manipulated the body density of seals using detachable weights and floats, and compared stroke efforts of horizontally swimming seals under natural conditions using animal-borne recorders. The results indicated that seals had smaller stroke efforts to swim a given speed when they were closer to neutral buoyancy. We conclude that neutral buoyancy is likely the best body density to minimize the cost of transport in horizontal swimming by seals.

AB - Flying and terrestrial animals should spend energy to move while supporting their weight against gravity. On the other hand, supported by buoyancy, aquatic animals can minimize the energy cost for supporting their body weight and neutral buoyancy has been considered advantageous for aquatic animals. However, some studies suggested that aquatic animals might use non-neutral buoyancy for gliding and thereby save energy cost for locomotion. We manipulated the body density of seals using detachable weights and floats, and compared stroke efforts of horizontally swimming seals under natural conditions using animal-borne recorders. The results indicated that seals had smaller stroke efforts to swim a given speed when they were closer to neutral buoyancy. We conclude that neutral buoyancy is likely the best body density to minimize the cost of transport in horizontal swimming by seals.

KW - Energetic advantages

KW - Stroking patterns

KW - Elephant seals

KW - Body density

KW - Fish

KW - Whales

KW - Depth

KW - Sink

U2 - 10.1038/srep02205

DO - 10.1038/srep02205

M3 - Article

VL - 3

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - e2205

ER -

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