Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Northward range expansion in spring-staging barnacle geese is a response to climate change and population growth, mediated by individual experience

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

DOI

Open Access permissions

Open

Author(s)

Ingunn M. Tombre, Thomas Oudman, Paul Shimmings, Larry Griffin, Jouke Prop

School/Research organisations

Abstract

All long-distance migrants must cope with changing environments, but species differ greatly in how they do so. In some species, individuals might be able to adjust by learning from individual experiences and by copying others. This could greatly speed up the process of adjustment, but evidence from the wild is scarce. Here, we investigated the processes by which a rapidly growing population of barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis) responded to strong environmental changes on spring-staging areas in Norway. One area, Helgeland, has been the traditional site. Since the mid-1990s, an increasing number of geese stage in another area 250 km further north, Vesterålen. We collected data on goose numbers and weather conditions from 1975 to 2017 to explore the extent to which the increase in population size and a warmer climate contributed to this change in staging area use. During the study period, the estimated onset of grass growth advanced on average by 0.54 days/year in each of the two areas. The total production of digestible biomass for barnacle geese during the staging period increased in Vesterålen but remained stable in Helgeland. The goose population has doubled in size during the past 25 years, with most of the growth being accommodated in Vesterålen. The observations suggest that this dramatic increase would not have happened without higher temperatures in Vesterålen. Records of individually marked geese indicate that from the initial years of colonization onwards, especially young geese tended to switch to Vesterålen, thereby predominating in the flocks at Vesterålen. Older birds had a lower probability of switching to Vesterålen, but over the years, the probability increased for all ages. Our findings suggest that barnacle geese integrate socially learned behaviour with adjustments to individual experiences, allowing the population to respond rapidly and accurately to global change.
Close

Details

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages14
JournalGlobal Change Biology
VolumeEarly View
Early online date2 Sep 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Sep 2019

    Research areas

  • Age effects, Dynamic strategies, Explorative behaviour, Food quality, Population increase, Range shift, Spring migration

Discover related content
Find related publications, people, projects and more using interactive charts.

View graph of relations

Related by journal

  1. Global Change Biology (Journal)

    Will Cresswell (Reviewer)
    6 Dec 2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

  2. Global Change Biology (Journal)

    Will Cresswell (Reviewer)
    23 Feb 2018

    Activity: Publication peer-review and editorial work typesPeer review of manuscripts

Related by journal

  1. Diverse effects of invasive ecosystem engineers on marine biodiversity and ecosystem functions: a global review and meta-analysis

    Guy-Haim, T., Lyons, D. A., Kotta, J., Ojaveer, H., Queirós, A. M., Chatzinikolaou, E., Arvanitidis, C., Como, S., Magni, P., Blight, A. J., Orav-Kotta, H., Somerfield, P. J., Crowe, T. P. & Rilov, G., Mar 2018, In : Global Change Biology. 24, 3, p. 906-924

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  2. Reproductive performance and diving behaviour share a common sea-ice concentration optimum in Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae)

    Le Guen, C., Kato, A., Raymond, B., Barbraud, C., Beaulieu, M., Bost, C-A., Delord, K., MacIntosh, A. J. J., Meyer, X., Raclot, T., Sumner, M., Takahashi, A., Thiebot, J-B. & Ropert-Coudert, Y., 29 Jun 2018, In : Global Change Biology. Early View

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  3. Denial of long-term issues with agriculture on tropical peatlands will have devastating consequences

    Wijedasa, L. S., Jauhiainen, J., Könönen, M., Lampela, M., Vasander, H., Leblanc, M. C., Evers, S., Smith, T. E. L., Yule, C. M., Varkkey, H., Lupascu, M., Parish, F., Singleton, I., Clements, G. R., Aziz, S. A., Harrison, M. E., Cheyne, S., Anshari, G. Z., Meijaard, E., Goldstein, J. E. & 117 others, Waldron, S., Hergoualc'h, K., Dommain, R., Frolking, S., Evans, C. D., Posa, M. R. C., Glaser, P. H., Suryadiputra, N., Lubis, R., Santika, T., Padfield, R., Kurnianto, S., Hadisiswoyo, P., Lim, T. W., Page, S. E., Gauci, V., Van Der Meer, P. J., Buckland, H., Garnier, F., Samuel, M. K., Choo, L. N. L. K., O'Reilly, P., Suksuwan, S., Sumarga, E., Jain, A., Laurance, W. F., Couwenberg, J., Joosten, H., Vernimmen, R., Hooijer, A., Malins, C., Cochrane, M. A., Perumal, B., Siegert, F., Peh, K. S. H., Comeau, L. P., Verchot, L., Harvey, C. F., Cobb, A., Jaafar, Z., Wösten, H., Manuri, S., Müller, M., Giesen, W., Phelps, J., Yong, D. L., Silvius, M., Wedeux, B. M. M., Hoyt, A., Osaki, M., Hirano, T., Takahashi, H., Kohyama, T. S., Haraguchi, A., Nugroho, N. P., Coomes, D. A., Quoi, L. P., Dohong, A., Gunawan, H., Gaveau, D. L. A., Langner, A., Lim, F. K. S., Edwards, D. P., Giam, X., Van Der Werf, G., Carmenta, R., Verwer, C. C., Gibson, L., Gandois, L., Graham, L. L. B., Regalino, J., Wich, S. A., Rieley, J., Kettridge, N., Brown, C., Pirard, R., Moore, S., Capilla, B. R., Ballhorn, U., Ho, H. C., Hoscilo, A., Lohberger, S., Evans, T. A., Yulianti, N., Blackham, G., Onrizal, Husson, S., Murdiyarso, D., Pangala, S., Cole, L. E. S., Tacconi, L., Segah, H., Tonoto, P., Lee, J. S. H., Schmilewski, G., Wulffraat, S., Putra, E. I., Cattau, M. E., Clymo, R. S., Morrison, R., Mujahid, A., Miettinen, J., Liew, S. C., Valpola, S., D'Arcy, L., Gerding, M., Sundari, S., Thornton, S. A., Kalisz, B., Chapman, S. J., Su, A. S. M., Basuki, I., Itoh, M., Traeholt, C., Sloan, S., Sayok, A. K. & Andersen, R., Mar 2017, In : Global Change Biology. 23, 3, p. 977-982 6 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

  4. Range shifts or extinction? Ancient DNA and distribution modelling reveal past and future responses to climate warming in cold-adapted birds

    Lagerholm, V. K., Sandoval-Castellanos, E., Vaniscotte, A., Potapova, O. R., Tomek, T., Bochenski, Z. M., Shepherd, P., Barton, N., Van Dyck, M-C., Miller, R., Höglund, J., Yoccoz, N. G., Dalén, L. & Stewart, J. R., Apr 2017, In : Global Change Biology. 23, 4, p. 1425–1435

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

ID: 261009467

Top