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Observational learning of tool use in children: Investigating cultural spread through diffusion chains and learning mechanisms through ghost displays

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Author(s)

Lydia M. Hopper, Emma G. Flynn, Lara Amanda Natalia Wood, Andrew Whiten

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Abstract

In the first of two experiments, we demonstrate the spread of a novel form of tool use across 20 "cultural generations" of child-to-child transmission. An experimentally seeded technique spread with 100% fidelity along twice as many "generations" as has been investigated in recent exploratory "diffusion" experiments of this type. This contrasted with only a single child discovering the technique spontaneously in a comparable group tested individually without any model. This study accordingly documents children's social learning of tool use on a new, population-level scale that characterizes real-world cultural phenomena. In a second experiment, underlying social learning processes were investigated with a focus on the contrast between imitation (defined as copying actions) and emulation (defined as learning from the results of actions only). In two different "ghost" conditions, children were presented with the task used in the first experiment but now operated without sight of an agent performing the task, thereby presenting only the information used in emulation. Children in ghost conditions were less successful than those who had watched a model in action and showed variable matching to what they had seen. These findings suggest the importance of observational learning of complex tool use through imitation rather than only through emulation. Results of the two experiments are compared with those of similar experiments conducted previously with chimpanzees and are discussed in relation to the wider perspective of human culture and the influence of task complexity on social learning. Crown Copyright (c) 2009 Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-97
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Experimental Child Psychology
Volume106
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2010

    Research areas

  • Observational learning, Ghost condition, Diffusion chain, Imitation, Emulation, Culture, WILD CHIMPANZEES, COPYING ACTIONS, YOUNG-CHILDREN, HOMO-SAPIENS, IMITATION, TRANSMISSION, EMULATION, INFANTS, EVOLUTION, GESTURES

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