Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

On the revelation of the Holy Spirit and the problem of thirdness

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Standard

On the revelation of the Holy Spirit and the problem of thirdness. / Leidenhag, Joanna; Kroll, Kimberley.

The Third Person of the Trinity: Explorations in Constructive Dogmatics . ed. / Oliver D. Crisp; Fred Sanders. Zondervan, 2020. p. 36-54 (Los Angeles Theology Conference Series).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Leidenhag, J & Kroll, K 2020, On the revelation of the Holy Spirit and the problem of thirdness. in OD Crisp & F Sanders (eds), The Third Person of the Trinity: Explorations in Constructive Dogmatics . Los Angeles Theology Conference Series, Zondervan, pp. 36-54.

APA

Leidenhag, J., & Kroll, K. (2020). On the revelation of the Holy Spirit and the problem of thirdness. In O. D. Crisp, & F. Sanders (Eds.), The Third Person of the Trinity: Explorations in Constructive Dogmatics (pp. 36-54). (Los Angeles Theology Conference Series). Zondervan.

Vancouver

Leidenhag J, Kroll K. On the revelation of the Holy Spirit and the problem of thirdness. In Crisp OD, Sanders F, editors, The Third Person of the Trinity: Explorations in Constructive Dogmatics . Zondervan. 2020. p. 36-54. (Los Angeles Theology Conference Series).

Author

Leidenhag, Joanna ; Kroll, Kimberley. / On the revelation of the Holy Spirit and the problem of thirdness. The Third Person of the Trinity: Explorations in Constructive Dogmatics . editor / Oliver D. Crisp ; Fred Sanders. Zondervan, 2020. pp. 36-54 (Los Angeles Theology Conference Series).

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{af8f3fabbec7475099a98babc7a88972,
title = "On the revelation of the Holy Spirit and the problem of thirdness",
abstract = "{\textquoteleft}God is Spirit{\textquoteright} (Jn. 4:24) and yet one person of the Godhead is given the amorphous designator {\textquoteleft}Holy Spirit{\textquoteright}. Unlike the recognizable designators {\textquoteleft}Father{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}Son{\textquoteright}, as well as the familiar relation that holds between them, this {\textquoteleft}Holy Spirit{\textquoteright} in his person and relation to other persons (divine and human) creates, what we call, the problem of thirdness. The first two sections of this paper will outline how this problem of thirdness leads the theologian adrift into (1) the Charybdis of impersonal abstractions, or (2) the mouth of the Scylla where it is swallowed into other (more tangible) doctrine. Whereas (1) attempts to answer the question {\textquoteleft}what is {\textquoteleft}spirit{\textquoteright}?{\textquoteright}, (2) is preoccupied by {\textquoteleft}where is {\textquoteleft}the Holy Spirit{\textquoteright}?{\textquoteright}. Note, the question of {\textquoteleft}what{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}where{\textquoteright} do not arise in the same way, or with the same urgency in consideration of the first and second persons of the Trinity. The names {\textquoteleft}Father{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}Son{\textquoteright}, analogous to a well-known human relation, provide some relief here. The {\textquoteleft}Father{\textquoteright} and the {\textquoteleft}Son{\textquoteright} are clearly persons whose identities are understood in an ordered yet equal and loving relation to one another. By contrast, the third person who bears the name {\textquoteleft}Holy Spirit{\textquoteright} provides no such relief, and so the theologian is thrown back on to the questions {\textquoteleft}what is {\textquoteleft}spirit{\textquoteright}?{\textquoteright} and {\textquoteleft}where is {\textquoteleft}spirit{\textquoteright}?{\textquoteright}, or put another way, {\textquoteleft}how do we fit a third person, the Holy Spirit, into our understanding of the Godhead?{\textquoteright}. ",
author = "Joanna Leidenhag and Kimberley Kroll",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
day = "1",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780310106913",
series = "Los Angeles Theology Conference Series",
publisher = "Zondervan",
pages = "36--54",
editor = "Crisp, {Oliver D.} and Sanders, {Fred }",
booktitle = "The Third Person of the Trinity",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - On the revelation of the Holy Spirit and the problem of thirdness

AU - Leidenhag, Joanna

AU - Kroll, Kimberley

PY - 2020/12/1

Y1 - 2020/12/1

N2 - ‘God is Spirit’ (Jn. 4:24) and yet one person of the Godhead is given the amorphous designator ‘Holy Spirit’. Unlike the recognizable designators ‘Father’ and ‘Son’, as well as the familiar relation that holds between them, this ‘Holy Spirit’ in his person and relation to other persons (divine and human) creates, what we call, the problem of thirdness. The first two sections of this paper will outline how this problem of thirdness leads the theologian adrift into (1) the Charybdis of impersonal abstractions, or (2) the mouth of the Scylla where it is swallowed into other (more tangible) doctrine. Whereas (1) attempts to answer the question ‘what is ‘spirit’?’, (2) is preoccupied by ‘where is ‘the Holy Spirit’?’. Note, the question of ‘what’ and ‘where’ do not arise in the same way, or with the same urgency in consideration of the first and second persons of the Trinity. The names ‘Father’ and ‘Son’, analogous to a well-known human relation, provide some relief here. The ‘Father’ and the ‘Son’ are clearly persons whose identities are understood in an ordered yet equal and loving relation to one another. By contrast, the third person who bears the name ‘Holy Spirit’ provides no such relief, and so the theologian is thrown back on to the questions ‘what is ‘spirit’?’ and ‘where is ‘spirit’?’, or put another way, ‘how do we fit a third person, the Holy Spirit, into our understanding of the Godhead?’.

AB - ‘God is Spirit’ (Jn. 4:24) and yet one person of the Godhead is given the amorphous designator ‘Holy Spirit’. Unlike the recognizable designators ‘Father’ and ‘Son’, as well as the familiar relation that holds between them, this ‘Holy Spirit’ in his person and relation to other persons (divine and human) creates, what we call, the problem of thirdness. The first two sections of this paper will outline how this problem of thirdness leads the theologian adrift into (1) the Charybdis of impersonal abstractions, or (2) the mouth of the Scylla where it is swallowed into other (more tangible) doctrine. Whereas (1) attempts to answer the question ‘what is ‘spirit’?’, (2) is preoccupied by ‘where is ‘the Holy Spirit’?’. Note, the question of ‘what’ and ‘where’ do not arise in the same way, or with the same urgency in consideration of the first and second persons of the Trinity. The names ‘Father’ and ‘Son’, analogous to a well-known human relation, provide some relief here. The ‘Father’ and the ‘Son’ are clearly persons whose identities are understood in an ordered yet equal and loving relation to one another. By contrast, the third person who bears the name ‘Holy Spirit’ provides no such relief, and so the theologian is thrown back on to the questions ‘what is ‘spirit’?’ and ‘where is ‘spirit’?’, or put another way, ‘how do we fit a third person, the Holy Spirit, into our understanding of the Godhead?’.

UR - https://www.zondervan.com/9780310106913/the-third-person-of-the-trinity/

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9780310106913

T3 - Los Angeles Theology Conference Series

SP - 36

EP - 54

BT - The Third Person of the Trinity

A2 - Crisp, Oliver D.

A2 - Sanders, Fred

PB - Zondervan

ER -

Related by author

  1. Accountability, autism, and friendship with God

    Leidenhag, J., 10 Apr 2021, In: Studies in Christian Ethics. OnlineFirst, 13 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  2. Themed Issue: Science-Engaged Theology

    Leidenhag, J. (ed.) & Perry, J. (ed.), Apr 2021, In: Modern Theology. 37, 2, p. 243-563

    Research output: Contribution to journalSpecial issuepeer-review

  3. What is science-engaged theology?

    Perry, J. & Leidenhag, J., Apr 2021, In: Modern Theology. 37, 2, p. 245-253

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. Toward an analytic theology of charismatic gifts: preliminary questions

    Leidenhag, J., 28 Jan 2021, T&T Clark handbook of analytic theology. Arcadi, J. & Turner, J. T. (eds.). London: Bloomsbury T&T Clark, p. 281-294 (T&T Clark handbooks).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  5. Minding creation: theological panpsychism and a Christian doctrine of creation

    Leidenhag, J., 14 Jan 2021, London: Bloomsbury T&T Clark. 219 p. (T&T Clark Series in Systematic Theology )

    Research output: Book/ReportBook

ID: 266224056

Top