Skip to content

Research at St Andrews

Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dating as a Geochronological Tool for Late Quaternary Sediments in the Red Sea Region

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Standard

Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dating as a Geochronological Tool for Late Quaternary Sediments in the Red Sea Region. / Sanderson, David; Kinnaird, Timothy Charles.

Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea. 2019.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Harvard

Sanderson, D & Kinnaird, TC 2019, Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dating as a Geochronological Tool for Late Quaternary Sediments in the Red Sea Region. in Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_31

APA

Sanderson, D., & Kinnaird, T. C. (2019). Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dating as a Geochronological Tool for Late Quaternary Sediments in the Red Sea Region. In Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_31

Vancouver

Sanderson D, Kinnaird TC. Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dating as a Geochronological Tool for Late Quaternary Sediments in the Red Sea Region. In Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea. 2019 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_31

Author

Sanderson, David ; Kinnaird, Timothy Charles. / Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dating as a Geochronological Tool for Late Quaternary Sediments in the Red Sea Region. Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea. 2019.

Bibtex - Download

@inbook{cef2acd01a9e43aca30d396d525cf7d4,
title = "Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dating as a Geochronological Tool for Late Quaternary Sediments in the Red Sea Region",
abstract = "This chapter concerns the use of luminescence methods as geochronological tools for dating Late Quaternary sediments in the Red Sea region. The dating methods all use stimulated luminescence to register signals developed in mineral systems in response to long term exposure to ionising radiation in the environment. The principles of luminescence dating are outlined followed by discussion of its application to the Arabian Peninsula, where, particularly in SE Arabia and parts of the interior, a growing corpus of work is emerging, which is helping to define past arid or humid periods of importance to palaeoclimatology and to archaeology. Turning to the Red Sea, studies conducted within the DISPERSE project are presented both in marine and terrestrial settings. The motivation for much of this work concerns definition of the environmental conditions and chronologies for hominin and human dispersion through Arabia. Data are presented which identify, for the first time, late Pleistocene evidence on the inner continental shelf near the Farasan Islands, using material from the 2013 cruise of RV AEGAEO. Results are also presented from the littoral fringe of southwest Saudi Arabia, identifying units associated with MIS5 which have palaeo-environmental and archaeological significance. It is to be hoped that further research in coming decades will continue to extend the regional chronology for the littoral fringe of the Red Sea. In this respect, luminescence dating has the potential to help define the environmental history of this important area, to assist with assigning marine and terrestrial features into unique stages of Quaternary climate cycles, and to promote better understanding of human-environment interactions in this dynamic area.",
author = "David Sanderson and Kinnaird, {Timothy Charles}",
year = "2019",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_31",
language = "English",
booktitle = "Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - CHAP

T1 - Optically Stimulated Luminescence Dating as a Geochronological Tool for Late Quaternary Sediments in the Red Sea Region

AU - Sanderson, David

AU - Kinnaird, Timothy Charles

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - This chapter concerns the use of luminescence methods as geochronological tools for dating Late Quaternary sediments in the Red Sea region. The dating methods all use stimulated luminescence to register signals developed in mineral systems in response to long term exposure to ionising radiation in the environment. The principles of luminescence dating are outlined followed by discussion of its application to the Arabian Peninsula, where, particularly in SE Arabia and parts of the interior, a growing corpus of work is emerging, which is helping to define past arid or humid periods of importance to palaeoclimatology and to archaeology. Turning to the Red Sea, studies conducted within the DISPERSE project are presented both in marine and terrestrial settings. The motivation for much of this work concerns definition of the environmental conditions and chronologies for hominin and human dispersion through Arabia. Data are presented which identify, for the first time, late Pleistocene evidence on the inner continental shelf near the Farasan Islands, using material from the 2013 cruise of RV AEGAEO. Results are also presented from the littoral fringe of southwest Saudi Arabia, identifying units associated with MIS5 which have palaeo-environmental and archaeological significance. It is to be hoped that further research in coming decades will continue to extend the regional chronology for the littoral fringe of the Red Sea. In this respect, luminescence dating has the potential to help define the environmental history of this important area, to assist with assigning marine and terrestrial features into unique stages of Quaternary climate cycles, and to promote better understanding of human-environment interactions in this dynamic area.

AB - This chapter concerns the use of luminescence methods as geochronological tools for dating Late Quaternary sediments in the Red Sea region. The dating methods all use stimulated luminescence to register signals developed in mineral systems in response to long term exposure to ionising radiation in the environment. The principles of luminescence dating are outlined followed by discussion of its application to the Arabian Peninsula, where, particularly in SE Arabia and parts of the interior, a growing corpus of work is emerging, which is helping to define past arid or humid periods of importance to palaeoclimatology and to archaeology. Turning to the Red Sea, studies conducted within the DISPERSE project are presented both in marine and terrestrial settings. The motivation for much of this work concerns definition of the environmental conditions and chronologies for hominin and human dispersion through Arabia. Data are presented which identify, for the first time, late Pleistocene evidence on the inner continental shelf near the Farasan Islands, using material from the 2013 cruise of RV AEGAEO. Results are also presented from the littoral fringe of southwest Saudi Arabia, identifying units associated with MIS5 which have palaeo-environmental and archaeological significance. It is to be hoped that further research in coming decades will continue to extend the regional chronology for the littoral fringe of the Red Sea. In this respect, luminescence dating has the potential to help define the environmental history of this important area, to assist with assigning marine and terrestrial features into unique stages of Quaternary climate cycles, and to promote better understanding of human-environment interactions in this dynamic area.

U2 - 10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_31

DO - 10.1007/978-3-319-99408-6_31

M3 - Chapter

BT - Geological Setting, Palaeoenvironment and Archaeology of the Red Sea

ER -

Related by author

  1. Les pierres bleues mégalithiques de Stonehenge viennent de loin, très loin

    Parker Pearson, M. & Kinnaird, T. C., 1 Mar 2021, The Conversation.

    Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

  2. Stonehenge first stood in Wales: how archaeologists proved parts of the 5,000 year-old stone circle were imported

    Parker Pearson, M. & Kinnaird, T. C., 15 Feb 2021, The Conversation.

    Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

  3. The original Stonehenge? A dismantled stone circle in the Preseli Hills of west Wales

    Pearson, M. P., Pollard, J., Richards, C., Welham, K., Kinnaird, T., Shaw, D., Simmons, E., Stanford, A., Bevins, R., Ixer, R., Ruggles, C., Rylatt, J. & Edinborough, K., 12 Feb 2021, In: Antiquity. 95, 379, p. 85-103

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  4. The development of historic field systems in northern England: a case study at Wallington, Northumberland

    Vervust, S., Kinnaird, T., Dabaut, N. & Turner, S., 13 Dec 2020, In: Landscape History. 41, 2, p. 57-70 14 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

  5. The potential of portable luminescence readers in geomorphological investigations: a review

    Munyikwa, K., Kinnaird, T. C. & Sanderson, D. C. W., 2 Sep 2020, In: Earth Surface Processes and Landforms. Early View

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

ID: 257091996

Top