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Optimizing sampling design to deal with mist-net avoidance in Amazonian birds and bats

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Optimizing sampling design to deal with mist-net avoidance in Amazonian birds and bats. / Marques, Joao Tiago; Ramos Pereira, Maria J.; Marques, Tiago A.; Santos, Carlos David; Santana, Joana; Beja, Pedro; Palmeirim, Jorge M.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 9, 74505, 18.09.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Marques, JT, Ramos Pereira, MJ, Marques, TA, Santos, CD, Santana, J, Beja, P & Palmeirim, JM 2013, 'Optimizing sampling design to deal with mist-net avoidance in Amazonian birds and bats' PLoS One, vol. 8, no. 9, 74505. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0074505

APA

Marques, J. T., Ramos Pereira, M. J., Marques, T. A., Santos, C. D., Santana, J., Beja, P., & Palmeirim, J. M. (2013). Optimizing sampling design to deal with mist-net avoidance in Amazonian birds and bats. PLoS One, 8(9), [74505]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0074505

Vancouver

Marques JT, Ramos Pereira MJ, Marques TA, Santos CD, Santana J, Beja P et al. Optimizing sampling design to deal with mist-net avoidance in Amazonian birds and bats. PLoS One. 2013 Sep 18;8(9). 74505. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0074505

Author

Marques, Joao Tiago ; Ramos Pereira, Maria J. ; Marques, Tiago A. ; Santos, Carlos David ; Santana, Joana ; Beja, Pedro ; Palmeirim, Jorge M. / Optimizing sampling design to deal with mist-net avoidance in Amazonian birds and bats. In: PLoS One. 2013 ; Vol. 8, No. 9.

Bibtex - Download

@article{ab950ba9e3d44a85ad753f0d634545e4,
title = "Optimizing sampling design to deal with mist-net avoidance in Amazonian birds and bats",
abstract = "Mist netting is a widely used technique to sample bird and bat assemblages. However, captures often decline with time because animals learn and avoid the locations of nets. This avoidance or net shyness can substantially decrease sampling efficiency. We quantified the day-to-day decline in captures of Amazonian birds and bats with mist nets set at the same location for four consecutive days. We also evaluated how net avoidance influences the efficiency of surveys under different logistic scenarios using re-sampling techniques. Net avoidance caused substantial declines in bird and bat captures, although more accentuated in the latter. Most of the decline occurred between the first and second days of netting: 28{\%} in birds and 47{\%} in bats. Captures of commoner species were more affected. The numbers of species detected also declined. Moving nets daily to minimize the avoidance effect increased captures by 30{\%} in birds and 70{\%} in bats. However, moving the location of nets may cause a reduction in netting time and captures. When moving the nets caused the loss of one netting day it was no longer advantageous to move the nets frequently. In bird surveys that could even decrease the number of individuals captured and species detected. Net avoidance can greatly affect sampling efficiency but adjustments in survey design can minimize this. Whenever nets can be moved without losing netting time and the objective is to capture many individuals, they should be moved daily. If the main objective is to survey species present then nets should still be moved for bats, but not for birds. However, if relocating nets causes a significant loss of netting time, moving them to reduce effects of shyness will not improve sampling efficiency in either group. Overall, our findings can improve the design of mist netting sampling strategies in other tropical areas.",
keywords = "Vertical stratification , Insectivorous bats, Species richness, Forest, Population, Vegetation, Abundance, Habitats",
author = "Marques, {Joao Tiago} and {Ramos Pereira}, {Maria J.} and Marques, {Tiago A.} and Santos, {Carlos David} and Joana Santana and Pedro Beja and Palmeirim, {Jorge M.}",
year = "2013",
month = "9",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0074505",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "9",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) - Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Optimizing sampling design to deal with mist-net avoidance in Amazonian birds and bats

AU - Marques, Joao Tiago

AU - Ramos Pereira, Maria J.

AU - Marques, Tiago A.

AU - Santos, Carlos David

AU - Santana, Joana

AU - Beja, Pedro

AU - Palmeirim, Jorge M.

PY - 2013/9/18

Y1 - 2013/9/18

N2 - Mist netting is a widely used technique to sample bird and bat assemblages. However, captures often decline with time because animals learn and avoid the locations of nets. This avoidance or net shyness can substantially decrease sampling efficiency. We quantified the day-to-day decline in captures of Amazonian birds and bats with mist nets set at the same location for four consecutive days. We also evaluated how net avoidance influences the efficiency of surveys under different logistic scenarios using re-sampling techniques. Net avoidance caused substantial declines in bird and bat captures, although more accentuated in the latter. Most of the decline occurred between the first and second days of netting: 28% in birds and 47% in bats. Captures of commoner species were more affected. The numbers of species detected also declined. Moving nets daily to minimize the avoidance effect increased captures by 30% in birds and 70% in bats. However, moving the location of nets may cause a reduction in netting time and captures. When moving the nets caused the loss of one netting day it was no longer advantageous to move the nets frequently. In bird surveys that could even decrease the number of individuals captured and species detected. Net avoidance can greatly affect sampling efficiency but adjustments in survey design can minimize this. Whenever nets can be moved without losing netting time and the objective is to capture many individuals, they should be moved daily. If the main objective is to survey species present then nets should still be moved for bats, but not for birds. However, if relocating nets causes a significant loss of netting time, moving them to reduce effects of shyness will not improve sampling efficiency in either group. Overall, our findings can improve the design of mist netting sampling strategies in other tropical areas.

AB - Mist netting is a widely used technique to sample bird and bat assemblages. However, captures often decline with time because animals learn and avoid the locations of nets. This avoidance or net shyness can substantially decrease sampling efficiency. We quantified the day-to-day decline in captures of Amazonian birds and bats with mist nets set at the same location for four consecutive days. We also evaluated how net avoidance influences the efficiency of surveys under different logistic scenarios using re-sampling techniques. Net avoidance caused substantial declines in bird and bat captures, although more accentuated in the latter. Most of the decline occurred between the first and second days of netting: 28% in birds and 47% in bats. Captures of commoner species were more affected. The numbers of species detected also declined. Moving nets daily to minimize the avoidance effect increased captures by 30% in birds and 70% in bats. However, moving the location of nets may cause a reduction in netting time and captures. When moving the nets caused the loss of one netting day it was no longer advantageous to move the nets frequently. In bird surveys that could even decrease the number of individuals captured and species detected. Net avoidance can greatly affect sampling efficiency but adjustments in survey design can minimize this. Whenever nets can be moved without losing netting time and the objective is to capture many individuals, they should be moved daily. If the main objective is to survey species present then nets should still be moved for bats, but not for birds. However, if relocating nets causes a significant loss of netting time, moving them to reduce effects of shyness will not improve sampling efficiency in either group. Overall, our findings can improve the design of mist netting sampling strategies in other tropical areas.

KW - Vertical stratification

KW - Insectivorous bats

KW - Species richness

KW - Forest

KW - Population

KW - Vegetation

KW - Abundance

KW - Habitats

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0074505

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0074505

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - PLoS One

T2 - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 9

M1 - 74505

ER -

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ID: 99506992